The XDA LG QPair Developer Challenge Voting Has Begun!

It seems like it was just yesterday that weannounced that we had paired up with LGto … more

Major Update for the Sony Smartwatch 2 Brings DND and More

With the wearables landscape now dominated by Android Wear and Pebble, its … more

How to Root Android Wear 5.0.1 Lollipop Devices – XDA TV

The Lollipop update for Android Wear devices has hit the market and people are … more

Android 5.0.2 and New Factory Images For Nexus 7 (Wi-Fi) Available

Android 5.0 is has been publicly available since early November, and the … more

Welcome to XDA

Search to go directly to your device's forum

Register an account

Unlock full posting privileges

Ask a question

No registration required
Post Reply

Any chance at 24 Hz (24p) output?

OP onlinespending

21st August 2014, 01:12 AM   |  #1  
OP Senior Member
Thanks Meter: 9
 
272 posts
Join Date:Joined: Sep 2007
It's a bit frustrating that none of the major streaming devices (Fire TV, Apple TV, Chromecast, etc) support 24 Hz video output, and this despite indications that the video chips used by these devices are fully capable of it. It's as if no one working at Amazon, Apple, or Google care a lick about video quality and preserving the native frame rate of most films (24 fps). Hell, the Boxee Box supported 24 Hz output. From what I've heard the Roku Stick does as well, though I'd love it on a device a bit more open such as the very hackable Fire TV. Which leads me to my question; have there have been any in roads made in unlocking 24 Hz video output with the rootable Fire TV?
21st August 2014, 04:48 AM   |  #2  
Member
Thanks Meter: 2
 
70 posts
Join Date:Joined: Jun 2013
More
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlinespending

It's a bit frustrating that none of the major streaming devices (Fire TV, Apple TV, Chromecast, etc) support 24 Hz video output, and this despite indications that the video chips used by these devices are fully capable of it. It's as if no one working at Amazon, Apple, or Google care a lick about video quality and preserving the native frame rate of most films (24 fps). Hell, the Boxee Box supported 24 Hz output. From what I've heard the Roku Stick does as well, though I'd love it on a device a bit more open such as the very hackable Fire TV. Which leads me to my question; have there have been any in roads made in unlocking 24 Hz video output with the rootable Fire TV?

im at a loss here, what is the problem? i have seen a wide variety of video formats and have yet to have a single problem. i assume the firetv is running at 60hz? i may be wrong but that means it can play anything from 1 to 60 hz smoothly. so whats the big deal? if anything running a higher hz would mean a smoother animation?
21st August 2014, 04:56 AM   |  #3  
OP Senior Member
Thanks Meter: 9
 
272 posts
Join Date:Joined: Sep 2007
Quote:
Originally Posted by Volc7

im at a loss here, what is the problem? i have seen a wide variety of video formats and have yet to have a single problem. i assume the firetv is running at 60hz? i may be wrong but that means it can play anything from 1 to 60 hz smoothly. so whats the big deal? if anything running a higher hz would mean a smoother animation?

no offense, but I was actually going to make a comment in my original post along the lines of, "if you don't know what 24 Hz output (24p) is or why it's important, then don't bother responding". Obviously nothing against you personally, it's just that I've seen 24hz/24p related threads on other forums (Plex, Roku, etc) and they quickly get sidetracked into an explanation of its benefits and why it's important. Google is your friend for that.

But just to summarize, most movies (and even many modern TV shows) are filmed at 24 progressive frames per second. When outputting a native 24 Hz video at 60 Hz, the device must fill in the gaps to "magically" create 60 frames/second out of just 24. And since 60 is not an even multiple of 24, the process is far from ideal. This results in judder or non-smooth playback, which is most noticeable during slow panning scenes (can also be seen quite easily on scrolling credits). If you find yourself saying "well every video I've played looks good". Well, this is case of "ignorance is bliss". Watch a movie on a projector at 24 Hz or a 120Hz TV that accepts 24p input (120 is a nice multiple of 24, so each frame needs to be merely replicated 5x) and you'll see the difference with your own two eyes.
Last edited by onlinespending; 21st August 2014 at 05:03 AM.
21st August 2014, 05:31 AM   |  #4  
Member
Thanks Meter: 2
 
70 posts
Join Date:Joined: Jun 2013
More
well at least you said no offense...

but IF the hardware is capable, unlocking 24hz shouldnt be a problem IF they manage to make custom roms for it

*i just watched a blueray on my 72hz monitor (3x 24) and then changed it to 60hz, sadly i saw nothing different, perhaps my fast computer does a better job at rendering. guess its one of those things that videophiles can detect that a normal guy cant xD
Last edited by Volc7; 21st August 2014 at 06:22 AM.
21st August 2014, 09:46 AM   |  #5  
Junior Member
Thanks Meter: 1
 
18 posts
Join Date:Joined: Jul 2014
Quote:
Originally Posted by onlinespending

no offense, but I was actually going to make a comment in my original post along the lines of, "if you don't know what 24 Hz output (24p) is or why it's important, then don't bother responding". Obviously nothing against you personally, it's just that I've seen 24hz/24p related threads on other forums (Plex, Roku, etc) and they quickly get sidetracked into an explanation of its benefits and why it's important. Google is your friend for that.

But just to summarize, most movies (and even many modern TV shows) are filmed at 24 progressive frames per second. When outputting a native 24 Hz video at 60 Hz, the device must fill in the gaps to "magically" create 60 frames/second out of just 24. And since 60 is not an even multiple of 24, the process is far from ideal. This results in judder or non-smooth playback, which is most noticeable during slow panning scenes (can also be seen quite easily on scrolling credits). If you find yourself saying "well every video I've played looks good". Well, this is case of "ignorance is bliss". Watch a movie on a projector at 24 Hz or a 120Hz TV that accepts 24p input (120 is a nice multiple of 24, so each frame needs to be merely replicated 5x) and you'll see the difference with your own two eyes.

I have Amazon Fre TV and Minix neo x7. Minix x7 have 24hz output and video plays smooth without jitter or stuttering. On Amazon Fire TV all videos have jitter and stuttering this can be seen when picture is moving slowly from left to right and wise versa. I though that it's problem with with my Fire TV because I'm from UK and I bought Fire TV from USA. If I change refresh rate on Minix to 60hz I see the same jitter and stuttering.
7th October 2014, 10:14 PM   |  #6  
Junior Member
Thanks Meter: 0
 
2 posts
Join Date:Joined: Nov 2011
Quote:

*i just watched a blueray on my 72hz monitor (3x 24) and then changed it to 60hz, sadly i saw nothing different, perhaps my fast computer does a better job at rendering. guess its one of those things that videophiles can detect that a normal guy cant xD

Its not only the one refresh per frame that makes the movies so smooth when outputting with 24Hz.
Depending on your TV, it also smoothes the motions (inserting calculated frames between the movies frames) when the signal is appropriate (e.g. 24Hz).
Outputting at 60Hz, and probably even into the DVI-HDMI, usually results in the TV just showing the 60Hz it gets.
Oh btw did you use a movie player which allows to sync the movie to the refresh rate like MediaPlayerClassic HomeCinema?
I´m pretty sure the result wouldn´t have differed much though: 24fps, being in sync or not, are simply not enough for smooth playback of motion.
The Hobbit movies for example were filmed in 48fps (HFR(-3D)). This way one was able to see smooth motion even in the cinema. For home use you only get to buy 24fps BluRays - but your (reasonable good) TV does the smoothening on the 24Hz signal it gets from your BluRay player.
Post Reply Subscribe to Thread
Previous Thread Next Thread
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes