FORUMS

Analysis & Opinion

Top Forum Discussions

 View Poll Results: Is 1GB RAM enough for todays top phones?

Yes.
 
124 Vote(s)
56.88%
No.
 
88 Vote(s)
40.37%
I do not care about the RAM capacity.
 
6 Vote(s)
2.75%

Is 1GB RAM memory enough?

160 posts
Thanks Meter: 10
 
By DaveBG, Senior Member on 4th May 2012, 10:24 AM
Post Reply Subscribe to Thread Email Thread
22nd May 2012, 03:37 AM |#31  
Junior Member
Thanks Meter: 0
 
More
so what's the final verdict? is it really ok to only have 1gb of ram in s3?
 
 
22nd May 2012, 10:08 PM |#32  
Chris_84's Avatar
Recognized Contributor
Flag Ingolstadt
Thanks Meter: 5,037
 
More
Quote:
Originally Posted by swent

It will definitely be fine, android is great with ram management and if you really feel the need to add some extra spice, then get a god damn kernel with swap support and create a swap partition (even on external sdcard if u want)...

After all its just Linux.

You are right. Got on my s1 1.6 gb ram. Never ever needed so much but was funny to try it.

Sent from my GT-I9000 using xda premium
22nd May 2012, 10:09 PM |#33  
Chris_84's Avatar
Recognized Contributor
Flag Ingolstadt
Thanks Meter: 5,037
 
More
Quote:
Originally Posted by eaon21

so what's the final verdict? is it really ok to only have 1gb of ram in s3?

For me its enough.

Sent from my GT-I9000 using xda premium
22nd May 2012, 11:36 PM |#34  
HKboy92's Avatar
Member
Flag Den Helder
Thanks Meter: 10
 
More
More then enough. If you run out, you should look in the mirror
24th May 2012, 06:46 AM |#35  
pizz0wn3d's Avatar
Senior Member
Flag Summerville, SC
Thanks Meter: 369
 
More
Quote:
Originally Posted by HKboy92

More then enough. If you run out, you should look in the mirror

Why? Is there more RAM in the mirror?

Herp derp Captivate XDA Premium App.
24th May 2012, 09:02 AM |#36  
Senior Member
Thanks Meter: 237
 
More
I posted this before and its a cut and paste but I don't recall where I got it anymore. I was trying to help explain how android uses memory and why task killers can often hurt more than they help unless the person using them understands android memory management and doesn't work against it. I have deleted my own conclusions on task killers and leave here just the basics on how android uses memory. The main thing you should come away with is that if you run out of memory you probably have a problem, most likely a rogue app. At any rate here is the cut and paste.....

By default, every application runs in its own Linux process. Android starts the process when any of the application's code needs to be executed, and shuts down the process when it's no longer needed and system resources are required by other applications.

A content provider is active only while it's responding to a request from a ContentResolver. And a broadcast receiver is active only while it's responding to a broadcast message. So there's no need to explicitly shut down these components.

Activities, on the other hand, provide the user interface. They're in a long-running conversation with the user and may remain active, even when idle, as long as the conversation continues. Similarly, services may also remain running for a long time. So Android has methods to shut down activities and services in an orderly way:

An activity can be shut down by calling its finish() method. One activity can shut down another activity (one it started with startActivityForResult()) by calling finishActivity().

A service can be stopped by calling its stopSelf() method, or by calling Context.stopService().

Components might also be shut down by the system when they are no longer being used or when Android must reclaim memory for more active components.

If the user leaves a task for a long time, the system clears the task of all activities except the root activity. When the user returns to the task again, it's as the user left it, except that only the initial activity is present. The idea is that, after a time, users will likely have abandoned what they were doing before and are returning to the task to begin something new.

An activity has essentially three states:

It is active or running when it is in the foreground of the screen (at the top of the activity stack for the current task). This is the activity that is the focus for the user's actions.

It is paused if it has lost focus but is still visible to the user. That is, another activity lies on top of it and that activity either is transparent or doesn't cover the full screen, so some of the paused activity can show through. A paused activity is completely alive (it maintains all state and member information and remains attached to the window manager), but can be killed by the system in extreme low memory situations.

It is stopped if it is completely obscured by another activity. It still retains all state and member information. However, it is no longer visible to the user so its window is hidden and it will often be killed by the system when memory is needed elsewhere.

If an activity is paused or stopped, the system can drop it from memory either by asking it to finish (calling its finish() method), or simply killing its process. When it is displayed again to the user, it must be completely restarted and restored to its previous state.

The foreground lifetime of an activity happens between a call to onResume() until a corresponding call to onPause(). During this time, the activity is in front of all other activities on screen and is interacting with the user. An activity can frequently transition between the resumed and paused states - for example, onPause() is called when the device goes to sleep or when a new activity is started, onResume() is called when an activity result or a new intent is delivered. Therefore, the code in these two methods should be fairly lightweight.

A few conclusions.....

Most services (while possibly running in the background) use very little memory when not actively doing something.
A content provider is only doing something when there is a notification for it to give. Otherwise it uses very little memory.

End cut and paste

The thing is android is designed to use as much memory as possible. This allows it to start paused activities using less resources overall which saves both time and cpu cycles and also saves battery. Even when you reboot your phone and look at the memory usage android does not need all the memory it has already used. It has called some processes in anticipation of their use but these are inactive and it will shut them down if you need those resources which happens in time measured by cpu cycles and this is very very fast. If you cannot run an application without running out of memory can pretty much figure you have something which isn't playing well with others.
The Following User Says Thank You to krabman For This Useful Post: [ View ]
24th May 2012, 01:08 PM |#37  
HKboy92's Avatar
Member
Flag Den Helder
Thanks Meter: 10
 
More
Quote:
Originally Posted by pizz0wn3d

Why? Is there more RAM in the mirror?

Herp derp Captivate XDA Premium App.

You should think about what you are doing wrong ;p
24th May 2012, 04:49 PM |#38  
Senior Member
Flag Umag
Thanks Meter: 29
 
More
1 gb of RAM is MORE than enough why?
Well Do we actually need 2GB of RAM in our smartphones? No, that’s just silly! No one will ever need more than 256MB 512MB 1GB of RAM in a phone!

All sarcasm aside, although we may not need 2GB of RAM in our smartphones right now, it would come in handy on our tablets. As OSes get more complex, apps get bigger, and our appetite for speed continues to drive our hand-on-wallet reflex, 2GB of RAM will become more and more attractive.

Unfortunately, that’s where the cycle continues. Devices with more RAM will beget apps that need more RAM to run and operating systems that can “do more stuff” — which will slow down our devices. We’ll need to throw in faster CPUs, more cores, and (you guessed it) more RAM to keep up with things.
7th June 2012, 09:19 AM |#40  
Junior Member
Thanks Meter: 0
 
More
so any HD android games will run smoothly in galaxy s3 while running a music player in the background and browsing the net? no apps will be killed plus no tabs being closed in the browser?
Last edited by eaon21; 7th June 2012 at 09:33 AM.
7th June 2012, 10:57 AM |#41  
jonathanyong's Avatar
Senior Member
Flag Glasgow
Thanks Meter: 84
 
More
I voted no because the gs3 does kill / suspend tasks in memory when around 5 or 6 apps are open, so obviously more memory is needed if we want to prevent the unloading of apps altogether.

But then we have to think about what effect keeping more apps open would have on battery life. The best solution would be to have more RAM, keep the apps in memory, but keep their threads sleeping until needed (unless the app is a background app e.g. music player). Android probably works that way already so having more RAM wouldn't hurt. Basically, there is NEVER too much RAM

Read More
Post Reply Subscribe to Thread
Previous Thread Next Thread
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes