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Dev friendliest phone

OP Radixtrator

17th March 2014, 09:11 PM   |  #1  
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So until now the N5 is the Dev friendliest phone ATM. Do you think it will lose that position when the one plus one is released? Do you think its worth switching to it when it comes out? Sorry if this is the wrong category or this post is stupid, I will gladly delete it if its not needed

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17th March 2014, 09:13 PM   |  #2  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Radixtrator

So until now the N5 is the Dev friendliest phone ATM. Do you think it will lose that position when the one plus one is released? Do you think its worth switching to it when it comes out? Sorry if this is the wrong category or this post is stupid, I will gladly delete it if its not needed

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any latest nexus will always be the dev friendliest phone. the one plus isnt an aosp phone.
17th March 2014, 09:19 PM   |  #3  
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I never really got the difference, the makers of the one plus said it will run cm with ability to install stock android. Doesn't that mean its aosp?

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17th March 2014, 09:26 PM   |  #4  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Radixtrator

I never really got the difference, the makers of the one plus said it will run cm with ability to install stock android. Doesn't that mean its aosp?

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Well AOSP and CM are different. That's why when you look at ROMs you see AOSP based and CM based mainly and same with kernels. CM actually has its own kernels now and can't run AOSP kernels.

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17th March 2014, 09:28 PM   |  #5  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Radixtrator

I never really got the difference, the makers of the one plus said it will run cm with ability to install stock android. Doesn't that mean its aosp?

Sent from my Nexus 5 using XDA Premium 4 mobile app

So what is the difference between Android and CyanogenMod?

About 1-2 times a year, the vanilla Android operating system (known as AOSP, or the Android Open Source Project) is internally developed, then released to the public, by Google. They provide the source code to anyone who wants to download it. The CyanogenMod community, comprised mostly of unpaid volunteers and enthusiasts from around the world, takes this newest Android code and "ports" it to dozens of new and older (aka "legacy") devices. At the same time, other CyanogenMod developers start adding features, fixes, and improvements that Google didn't include to the CyanogenMod code, which benefits all the devices. The CyanogenMod community has a whole infrastructure for people to build and test experimental versions, report bugs, and contribute back to the source code.

Sometimes features that started in CyanogenMod have appeared in newer version of "official" Android. And every time Android does a new "code dump" of their latest version, CyanogenMod benefits from Google's changes.

In this way, CyanogenMod is one (but not the only) community distribution of what started as vanilla AOSP. The Android community is vibrant, with numerous "modders" and "themers" and "performance enhancers" taking the source code and doing incredible things to it. Generally, there is a spirit of sharing knowledge and empowering people to experiment with controlling their devices, often giving old phones new life, and hopefully having fun in the process.

Source: http://wiki.cyanogenmod.org/w/About
17th March 2014, 09:40 PM   |  #6  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Radixtrator

I never really got the difference, the makers of the one plus said it will run cm with ability to install stock android. Doesn't that mean its aosp?

Sent from my Nexus 5 using XDA Premium 4 mobile app

ability to install stock android isnt the same as having everything made specifically for your phone(drivers and all). many phones can run aosp, after they have drivers hacked or added later. that doesnt mean that they are aosp phones. the drivers that come from aosp are made specifically for a nexus and cant be run on other hardware.

---------- Post added at 03:40 PM ---------- Previous post was at 03:31 PM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by mistahseller

So what is the difference between Android and CyanogenMod?

About 1-2 times a year, the vanilla Android operating system (known as AOSP, or the Android Open Source Project) is internally developed, then released to the public, by Google. They provide the source code to anyone who wants to download it. The CyanogenMod community, comprised mostly of unpaid volunteers and enthusiasts from around the world, takes this newest Android code and "ports" it to dozens of new and older (aka "legacy") devices. At the same time, other CyanogenMod developers start adding features, fixes, and improvements that Google didn't include to the CyanogenMod code, which benefits all the devices. The CyanogenMod community has a whole infrastructure for people to build and test experimental versions, report bugs, and contribute back to the source code.

Sometimes features that started in CyanogenMod have appeared in newer version of "official" Android. And every time Android does a new "code dump" of their latest version, CyanogenMod benefits from Google's changes.

In this way, CyanogenMod is one (but not the only) community distribution of what started as vanilla AOSP. The Android community is vibrant, with numerous "modders" and "themers" and "performance enhancers" taking the source code and doing incredible things to it. Generally, there is a spirit of sharing knowledge and empowering people to experiment with controlling their devices, often giving old phones new life, and hopefully having fun in the process.

Source: http://wiki.cyanogenmod.org/w/About

aosp is constantly getting developed, not twice, three, or four times a year. there is code constantly being added. some of that code also makes it to future android os updates. and bug fixes make it into aosp way before they get released for android os. cm has nothing at all to do with aosp. sure, some of their code makes it into aosp, so does some code of our developers here on xda that have nothing to with cm. cm is just a custom rom, nothing more. a custom rom that somewhat became a little larger because some manufacturers are using it on their devices. its a custom rom, just as rastakat is, just as purity is, etc.
17th March 2014, 09:58 PM   |  #7  
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The moto x has a dev version, made by a Google owned company, and it has many flashing limitations that the Nexus line does not have.

That's only an example, but no, I don't think any dev edition phone will ever have the development a nexus phone has, or the limitless possibilities a nexus has. Like bootloader complications, like the moto x DE has.

Sent from my cell phone telephone....
17th March 2014, 10:01 PM   |  #8  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kj2112

The moto x has a dev version, made by a Google owned company, and it has many flashing limitations that the Nexus line does not have.

That's only an example, but no, I don't think any dev edition phone will ever have the development a nexus phone has, or the limitless possibilities a nexus has. Like bootloader complications, like the moto x DE has.

Sent from my cell phone telephone....

motorola is now own by lenovo

http://www.engadget.com/2014/01/29/l...-for-motorola/
17th March 2014, 10:02 PM   |  #9  
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So in only dev terms speaking, for people that love flashing everything possible, nothing beats a nexus not even the "superphone" oneplusone?

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17th March 2014, 10:11 PM   |  #10  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Radixtrator

So in only dev terms speaking, for people that love flashing everything possible, nothing beats a nexus not even the "superphone" oneplusone?

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so in terms of devs or people that love flashing everything possible? those are 2 very different things. developers not only work on rom or kernel code, they also create apps, games, and other things for us to use. if all you want is a phone to flash on, you can use any phone(nexus for ease since its bootloader is unlockable). the one plus might come with an unlockable bootloader for ease of flashing, but that ease of flashing doesnt make it a developer phone.

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