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How make HELLO WORLD on the WM6.1 ???

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antyhero
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(Last edited by antyhero; 2nd February 2012 at 10:12 AM.)
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Default How make HELLO WORLD on the WM6.1 ???

Who can write Step by Step instruction by C++/VisualStudio 2008 ? for writing Hello World apps And simple actions of work with forms???
 
juliuscezar
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You can start here...http://www.hitmill.com/programming/cpp/helloWorld.htm

Remember a search engine is your friend.

Hope that I have help you.
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stephj
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In C++ you have the choice of WIN 32, ATL and MFC programming models. They are all different.

If you are using standard windows forms items ie buttons, editboxes, dropdowns etc. C# is a LOT easier.
 
Don Reba
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stephj View Post
If you are using standard windows forms items ie buttons, editboxes, dropdowns etc. C# is a LOT easier.
It is indeed much easier for "Hello World" type applications. For more complicated things, poor performance and lack of direct access to the native API begins to add up.

The original poster probably has some specific problem, the solution to which he hopes to find in a step-by-step tutorial. If he still has not been able to solve it, it might help to describe it to us.
 
stephj
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(Last edited by stephj; 10th March 2012 at 09:49 PM.)
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O.K........

Over the next few posts, (Rome wasn't built in a day!), this will build into a step by step tutorial in how to create a basic WIN32 application. As a start we will use the C# .Net solution I wrote in reply to this post:

http://forum.xda-developers.com/show....php?t=1435629

The original request was for an application that calculates the check digit for an intermodal container number. For the uninitiated, intermodal containers are the ubiquitous 20ft and 40ft metal boxes that dominate the shipping industry.


All containers have an eleven digit serial number of the form:

ABCD 123456 7

Where ABC is the code for the container's owner, and D is the Category Identifier, almost always a 'U'. 123456 is the serial number of the box and the final number '7' is the checksum digit which is calculated from the previous 10 characters. When keying in container numbers into computer systems etc, it can be used to quickly check whether the container number is valid before further processing is done. The same thing applies to the last digit of your credit card number, it is calculated from the previous 15 numbers.

Container numbers conform to ISO6346 and more can be read here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/ISO_6346

We will build a WIN32 C++ Mobile 6 application to calculate the check digit from those given in a text box on the screen.

Validation will be minimal, if the user enters anything but characters of the form AAAA999999 in the textbox, nothing appears in the check digit box. When valid, the checkdigit magically appears.

You will need:- Visual Studio Professional 2008, not the express version, and an installed Windows Mobile 6.0 SDK

The Express version of VS cannot target mobile devices. VS 2003/5 can also be used, as well as earlier or later versions of the SDK, but you will encounter slight differences in VS or the SDK, that you will have to fight your way through yourself.

The finished application will look something like the attached image.

Under Win32, there is no drag and drop toolbox, all controls have to be created from scratch. All good fun, so roll up your sleeves, break out the birch twigs and let the self-flagellation begin.......
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stephj
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(Last edited by stephj; 21st February 2012 at 10:22 AM.)
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Default Right!.....Let's go............

From VS2008 select

File -> New -> Project

Select C++, Smart Device and Win32 Smart Device Project. Select the destination for the project and name it IS06346. See image 01.

Click OK

On the Platforms submenu of the next screen add the Windows Mobile 6.0 SDK to the project and remove the others. See image 02

........and, on the 'Application Settings' submenu, make sure the Windows Application radio button is on, and all others are off. See image 03

Click Finish. The VS wizard will create all the basic files we need under the directory given above.

In fact, pressing F5 should build this project and run it in the emulator. The application does very little at this stage, nothing to be precise, but it should work........... See 04

The main program is ISO3486.cpp This shell program is some 250 lines of code, most of it is needed for a "do nothing" program, but it boils down into five main functions.


WinMain() The entry point of the program, where the operating system will call it on initial load. Leave it alone.


InitInstance() Called immediately by WinMain and where the program creates its initial window etc. We will add a few bits of extra initialization here.


MyRegisterClass() Called by InitInstance to register the window class, just before the initial window is created. Leave it alone unless you really know what you are doing.


WndProc() The message processing loop for the main/parent window. Any windows event will be fired at this function as a Windows Message, it is up to us to process the ones we need. A few variables will go in here. All the original WM2003 "Hello World" program did, in the EVC based SDK, was to intercept the WM_PAINT message, find the client area of the screen, and draw the text "Hello World" in the middle of it.


About() The message processing loop for the About dialog box. We will be quite happy with the default action so we'll leave it alone.









To Do:

1.) Add reference to <string.h>

2.) Create two text boxes and display them. Limit the entry to 10 characters on the main edit box and disable input on the second check digit box.

3) Draw an "Enter container number:" text label above the edit boxes in response to the WM_PAINT message. The edit boxes will draw themselves when required.

4.) Intercept the EN_CHANGE message from the main edit box. If the length of the text in the box is 10 characters long, uppercase it, and if it is valid, generate the checksum and display it in the checksum box, otherwise clear the checksum box. Replace the textbox text with its uppercase value, but do not respond the the EN_CHANGE message generated by this change, as this will trigger an infinite shower of EN_CHANGE messages.

When this is done, we will have a working application.










To be continued.....................
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stephj
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(Last edited by stephj; 3rd March 2012 at 09:24 PM.)
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Post Next...........

Let’s work our way down the TODO: list above.

1.) Add reference to “string.h”:
Later on we are going to use a call to towupper() to convert the input into uppercase. It is defined in string.h, so we have to add this to the source file.

At the top of the ISO6346.CPP after the line
Code:
#include "ISO6346.h"
Add the line:
Code:
#include "string.h"

2.) Create two text boxes and display them......

We will create two windows as text boxes, but we will save their handles as global variables as they are referenced from more than one function. While we are at it we also need a global Boolean variable to prevent the uppercased replacement from causing the runaway reaction mentioned above.
After:
Code:
HINSTANCE			g_hInst;		// current instance
HWND				g_hWndMenuBar;		// menu bar handle
Add:
Code:
HWND				g_hWndText,g_hWndCheck;
bool				g_Updating;
Now let’s create the text edit boxes. You may already know this, or this may be an eye opener, but all edit controls are actually windows in their own right, albeit that they are child windows of the main form.

In InitInstance() after:
Code:
    if (!hWnd)
    {
        return FALSE;
    }
add:
Code:
	g_hWndText= CreateWindow(TEXT("EDIT"),NULL,WS_CHILD | WS_BORDER,40,50,110,20,hWnd,NULL,hInstance,NULL);
	g_hWndCheck=CreateWindow(TEXT("EDIT"),NULL,WS_CHILD | WS_BORDER, 160,50,20,20,hWnd,NULL,hInstance,NULL);
This creates the text edit boxes. As yet they won’t be displayed, but we have to tweak them first. We want to disable the checkdigit box, so that the user cannot type anything into it as we will set it with the correct value when a valid container number is entered in the text box. We will disable it by calling the EnableWindow() function.

We also need to set the size of the text edit window to 10 characters. Under MFC and .NET this is a hoot, as it already a property of the edit control object, which has been conveniently wrappered for us, and we can just set that property. Here in the world of Win32, it is not quite so simple. We have to fire an EM_SETLIMITTEXT message at the window, to tell it that that is what we want. While we are at it, let's set the global g_Updating variable to be false, ready for use later, and here is as good a place as any to do it.

After the CreateWindow() lines we have just added, add the next three lines to do the above.

Code:
	SendMessage(g_hWndText,EM_SETLIMITTEXT,10,0);
	EnableWindow(g_hWndCheck,false);
	g_Updating=false;
Now the windows exist as we want them, all we have to do is display them. At the bottom of the InitInstance() function after
Code:
	ShowWindow(hWnd, nCmdShow);
add
Code:
	ShowWindow(g_hWndText,  nCmdShow);
	ShowWindow(g_hWndCheck, nCmdShow);
The main window will now look after them and control them as required. Marvellous!

3) Draw an "Enter container number:" text label............

Now we need a label above the two boxes to tell the user to type a valid container number number into the text box. From the resource view of the project, open the String Table folder in ISO6346ppc.rc then open the String Table object. Click in the blank entry at the bottom and change the ID to IDS_ENTER and the Caption to "Enter container number:" Don't worry about the what the value is, if it is not '3', as the IDE will take care of it.

To get it drawn on the form, we will have to add it to the WM_PAINT event of the main window. We'll need a RECT structure to describe where we want the text to go, a buffer to store the string and while we are here let's add the function variables we are going to need later. At the top of the WndProc() function:
After:
Code:
	int wmId, wmEvent;
	PAINTSTRUCT ps;
	HDC hdc;
add

Code:
	TCHAR c,szBuffer[MAX_LOADSTRING];
	RECT rt;
	int i,j,k;
	bool valid;
i,j and k are general variables for calculating the check digit. szBuffer is used to hold the "Enter container number:" string in WM_PAINT, and also for the contents of the edit box when it changes. As these two events will not occur at the same time, we can get away with it having a dual personality. Variable 'c' is used to read the string one character at a time and 'valid' is set to false if the the container number is not in the correct format.

Replace the TODO: line in the WM_PAINT handler
Code:
            // TODO: Add any drawing code here...
with:
Code:
   
rt.top=20;
rt.bottom=40;
rt.left=40;
rt.right=180;
LoadString(g_hInst,IDS_ENTER,szBuffer,MAX_LOADSTRING);
DrawText(hdc,szBuffer,wcslen(szBuffer),&rt,0);
Now when the form is drawn, the label will appear in the right place.

4.) Intercept the EN_CHANGE message from the main edit box..........

There is no easy way to do the next bit step-by-step, so we will just do it, I'll explain later.........

Replace the standard code for the response to the WM_COMMAND message:
Code:
        case WM_COMMAND:
            wmId    = LOWORD(wParam); 
            wmEvent = HIWORD(wParam); 
            // Parse the menu selections:
            switch (wmId)
            {
                case IDM_HELP_ABOUT:
                    DialogBox(g_hInst, (LPCTSTR)IDD_ABOUTBOX, hWnd, About);
                    break;
                case IDM_OK:
                    SendMessage (hWnd, WM_CLOSE, 0, 0);				
                    break;
                default:
                    return DefWindowProc(hWnd, message, wParam, lParam);
            }
            break;
with this:

Code:
		case WM_COMMAND:
			wmId    = LOWORD(wParam); 
			wmEvent = HIWORD(wParam); 
			// Parse the menu selections:
			switch (wmId)
			{	
				case IDM_HELP_ABOUT:
					DialogBox(g_hInst, (LPCTSTR)IDD_ABOUTBOX, hWnd, (DLGPROC)About);
				    break;
				case IDOK:
					SendMessage (hWnd, WM_CLOSE, 0, 0);
					break;
			}
			
			switch (wmEvent)
			{	
				case EN_CHANGE:
					if(g_hWndText == (HWND) lParam && !g_Updating)
					{
					 GetWindowText(g_hWndText, szBuffer,MAX_LOADSTRING);
					 if(wcslen(szBuffer)==10)
					 {
					   k=0;
					   valid=true;
					   for(i=0; i<10; i++)
					   {
						c=szBuffer[i]=towupper(szBuffer[i]);
						if((i<4 && (c<'A' || c>'Z')) || (i>3 && (c<'0' || c>'9')))
							valid = false;
						j=int(c);
						if (j > 64 && j < 91)
						  k += ((j - 55) + (j - 56) / 10) << i;
						else
						  k += (j - 48) << i;
					  }
					   
				 	   if(valid)
						{
						// Calculate final check digit
						k = ((k % 11) % 10);
						// Do not process the following update
						g_Updating = true;
				        	SetWindowText(g_hWndText,szBuffer);
						g_Updating = false;
						// Set check window to correct value
						szBuffer[0]='0'+k;
						szBuffer[1]='\0';
					        SetWindowText(g_hWndCheck,szBuffer);
						// Position cursor at end of edit field.
						SendMessage(g_hWndText,EM_SETSEL,10,10);
						}
					    else
				        SetWindowText(g_hWndCheck,TEXT(""));
					 }
				     else
				      SetWindowText(g_hWndCheck,TEXT(""));
					}
					break;
				default:
				   return DefWindowProc(hWnd, message, wParam, lParam);
			}
			break;
When the text edit box contents are changed, a EN_CHANGE message arrives at the parent window. It appears as a WM_COMMAND message with the wmEvent parameter containing the EN_CHANGE identifier, together with the handle of the window that generated the message. That is why the second 'switch' code exists to trap the EN_CHANGE event message.

If the EN_CHANGE message came from the Text edit window, not the Checksum window, then get the text within it. If the length is 10 characters long, then process the string. The variable k is used as a running total for the checksum. If after processing all 10 characters, the string is still valid, it is converted modulo 11 and then modulo 10 into the final checksum number. The checksum edit box is then updated with this value. The contents of the Edit box are replaced with its uppercase value. In doing so, we will cause another EN_CHANGE message to be sent to the parent window, which would cause this function to be executed again, and so on and so forth, causing an infinite shower of messages. To prevent this, we set the global variable g_Updating to true before making the change, and then setting it to false immediately afterwards. The test in the first line of the EN_CHANGE processing code, does not execute at all if g_Updating is true, thereby preventing this problem.

Build the final program, and test it in the emulator. Switch the build to 'Release' and the target to Windows Mobile Device, and run the executable on your device.

The complete ISO6346.cpp file is included in the attached zip file.

Here endeth the lesson...........

As a continuation, we will build the whole thing again from scratch, but next time using the Microsoft Foundation Class, MFC.

Watch this space..................
Attached Thumbnails
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Name:	ISO6346_05.jpg
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Name:	ISO6346_06.jpg
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ID:	900051  
Attached Files
File Type: zip ISO6346.zip - [Click for QR Code] (3.3 KB, 10 views)
 
jwoegerbauer
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(Last edited by jwoegerbauer; 11th February 2012 at 03:20 PM.)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Don Reba View Post
It is indeed much easier for "Hello World" type applications. For more complicated things, poor performance and lack of direct access to the native API begins to add up.
I totally agree with this! And worst thing is you can neither use a resource hacker tool nor a dependency walker tool, if you want to inspect a .NET CF application.
 
stephj
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(Last edited by stephj; 28th February 2012 at 04:06 PM.)
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Default Using MFC......

From VS2008 as before select File->New->Project then select Visual C++, Smart Device, and MFC Smart Device Application.

Name it ISO6346 as before, and click OK. See image 01

On the platforms submenu select the Windows Mobile 6.0 SDK as before. See image 02

On the Application Type submenu, select the "Dialog Based" and "Use MFC in a static Library" radio buttons. See Image 03

By default the application comes with two dialog boxes for portrait and landscape but in our case this is complete overkill. We will get rid of the Landscape (Wide) dialog box.
In the Dialog folder of the resource view of ISO6346ppc.rc, delete the IDD_ISO6346_DIALOG_WIDE entry. See image 04.

To get this past the compiler, we will have to tidy it up a bit. In ISO6346Dlg.cpp delete the following sections of code.

Code:
#if defined(_DEVICE_RESOLUTION_AWARE) && !defined(WIN32_PLATFORM_WFSP)
void CISO6346Dlg::eek:nSize(UINT /*nType*/, int /*cx*/, int /*cy*/)
{
	if (AfxIsDRAEnabled())
	{
		DRA::RelayoutDialog(
			AfxGetResourceHandle(), 
			this->m_hWnd, 
			DRA::GetDisplayMode() != DRA::Portrait ? 
			MAKEINTRESOURCE(IDD_ISO6346_DIALOG_WIDE) : 
			MAKEINTRESOURCE(IDD_ISO6346_DIALOG));
	}
}
#endif
and also:
Code:
#if defined(_DEVICE_RESOLUTION_AWARE) && !defined(WIN32_PLATFORM_WFSP)
	ON_WM_SIZE()
#endif
Double Click in the IDD_ISO6346_DIALOG entry to open it up in the main window. Click on the "TODO: Place dialog controls here" label and change its caption to "Enter container number:", and position it near the top of the dialog box. From the Toolbox view, drop two edit controls on to the dialog box, under the above label. See image 05. Right click on the first box and select Add Variable. Name the first box edtText and click Finish. See image 06. Do the same for the second box and name it edtCheck. Notice that the wizard has added entries for the DoDataExchange(CDataExchange* pDX) function.


In OnInitDialog() after the line
Code:
	// TODO: Add extra initialization here
Add:
Code:
	Updating=false;
	edtText.LimitText(10);
	edtCheck.SetReadOnly();
Note that an Edit Control has more useful methods to call than the Win32 method above, where setting the text limit of the control has to be done by sending windows messages to it.

Right click on the Text Edit Box control and select "Add event handler..." select the EN_CHANGE message, take the default event handler function name, and click the "Add and Edit" button. See image 07 In ISO6346Dlg.h notice that the wizard has added the two edit boxes at the bottom of the file, and also added the message map thus:
Code:
public:
	CEdit edtText;
	CEdit edtCheck;
	afx_msg void OnEnChangeEdit1();
In the //Implementation section of the same file after
Code:
	HICON m_hIcon;
add:
Code:
	bool Updating;
This will be used as before to prevent an infinite cascade of messages.

In the OnChangeEdit1() function add the following code:
Code:
	int i,j,k;
	wchar_t c;
	bool valid;

	CString strText,strCheck;

	if(!Updating)
	{
	  if(edtText.LineLength(0)==10)
	  {
 	   edtText.GetLine(0,strText.GetBuffer(10),10);
 	   strText.ReleaseBuffer(-1);
	   strText.MakeUpper();
	   k=0;
	   valid = true;
	   // Check the contents are of the form ABCD123456
	   for(i=0; i<10; i++)
	   {
	    c=strText.GetAt(i);
		j=int(c);
		if((i<4 && (c<'A' || c>'Z')) || (i>3 && (c<'0' || c>'9')))
			valid = false;

		if (j > 64 && j < 91)
           k += ((j - 55) + (j - 56) / 10) << i;
         else
           k += (j - 48) << i;
	   }

 	   if(valid)
	   {
	    // Calculate final check digit
	    k = ((k % 11) % 10);
		strCheck.GetBufferSetLength(1);
		strCheck.SetAt(0,'0'+k);
		strCheck.ReleaseBuffer(-1);
	    edtCheck.SetWindowTextW(strCheck);

                Updating = true;
	   // Do not process the following update
                edtText.SetWindowTextW(strText);
	   Updating = false;
	   // Position cursor at end of edit field.
	   edtText.SetSel(10,10,0);
	   }
	   else //Invalid Not ABCD123456 - clear the check digit field
  	      edtCheck.SetWindowTextW(TEXT(""));
	 }
	 else  // Invalid - Not 10 char long  - clear the check digit field
	   edtCheck.SetWindowTextW(TEXT(""));
	}
This time we use CString objects to get/set the contents of the edit controls.

Right! That's it. Compile it and run it, either in the emulator or on the device.

See image 08. Notice that as this a dialog application, there are no menu buttons. When the [X] button is pressed the program terminates.

As another interesting point, compare the sizes of the two release executables. The Win32 version is around 8.5kb, that of the MFC version is around 167kb, both launch pretty damned quickly. Compare that with the . NET C# executable from the original post. That is around 9kb in size, but it takes your device around three seconds to shove it through the JiT compiler in order to able to run it, and that is for only a tiny .NET program.
Attached Thumbnails
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ID:	900352  

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