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KAYANG vs. MYUNGBO vs. LEEVIN vs. HONGUIN - Are they OEM SAMSUNG ?

24th January 2014, 09:06 PM   |  #1  
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KAYANG vs. MYUNGBO vs. LEEVIN vs. HONGUIN - Are they OEM SAMSUNG ?

In terms of the cable KAYANG vs. MYUNGBO etc... that MYUNGBO is infact an OEM SAMSUNG product,
Purchase a S3 from WindMobile or Rogers and take a look at the cable, yes, that is correct.. it is MYUNGBO

WHY? Samsung Electronics outsources various manufactures to produce their products and the following is a brief outline of the cable based on the country of origin

Samsung ECB-DU4AWC White Micro USB Cable often paired with the ETA-U90JWE
Leevin= UK/ USA
Myungbo= CDN/ Vietnam/ USA- some carriers in US depending on model
Kayang= Japan/ Korea/ USA- some carriers in US depending on model
Honguin- China/ Africa


All of these above cables are OEM Samsung and counterfeits typically do not have the logo printed on the cable itself, in terms of the adapter, yes the one with the chinese writing is fake, but the information in respects to the cable is incorrect.
In terms of what the little writing means on the cable, here is a breakdown and this information was found in Gregg l. Des Elms review (ctrl+F to myungbo) on amazon.com
If you carefully examine the length of the cables, you'll find some lettering on them. Somewhere in said lettering might be an amperage rating... which would be perfect, and would settle all bets.
Sadly, it's usually never quite that easy; and that's because what's written on most USB data and/or charging cables is no easy thing to decipher.

For example, on the charging cable that comes with the US version of the Samsung Galaxy SIII phone, we find:
US ECB-DU5ABE MADE IN CHINA, RT1C510ASE, E232407, AWM 21445 80C 30V VW-1 MYUNGBO KP NT NON-PVC
For starters, these cryptic numbers tells us that it's a US version cable; Samsung part number ECB-DU5ABE; made in China; using Myungbo-branded non-PVC insulation which subscribes to its E232407 plastics standard, and which further subscribes to the US Underwriters Laboratories (UL) safety standard as found on page 21445 of its Appliance Wiring Materials (AWM) guide.
Page 21445 of the UL AWM guide covers what's called the "UL 758 Standard for Safety of Appliance Wiring Materials", which covers a *WIDE* variety of appliance cables of varying voltage- and amperage-handling capabilities; however, generally speaking, the UL 758 standard covers 20 amps or less.

Well, of course, that doesn't really help us, 'cause I'm here ta' tell ya' that there isn't a USB data/charging cable on earth that'll handle 20 amps; and so we're talking, obviously, something somewhat less, here...
...but *WHAT* less? How much less? Oy. How to figure this stuff out... especially 'cause most of these cable makers won't actually specify the amps. The best they'll tend to do for us is show how many volts of which the cable's capable. Oh, sure, if that's all that's shown, then you can sit down with an Ohm's Law calcuator and figure it out... but, c'mon, who wants to do THAT in life, right?
Fortunately, I know the answer, and here's what I can tell you that'll help... it just kinda' cuts to the chase and makes all the other numbers irrelevant: any AWM-class cable which subscribes to what's on page 21445 of the UL 758 guide (and most newer USB charging and/or data cables are that; though there are a couple other AWM standards to which older cables subscribe which must be avoided) which is capable of handling 30 volts (as indicated by the "30 V" on the aforementioned SIII cable), and which can heat-up to 80 degrees Centigrade (which is around 175 degrees Fahrenheit) before it degrades or melts or smokes (which is what the "80C" on aforementioned SIII cable means) can easily handle 2.1 amps... a bit more, in fact.

So, then, that's really what you're looking for on these cables: something at or above "30 V" or "30V", and "80 C" or "80C"; along, of course, with the number "21445;" with or without the sometimes-added "VW-1". As long as you see that on the cable, then it's likely that said cable is capable of handling 2.1 amps...
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