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[Discussion] Direct access to e-MMC to fix bricked KF (HD 8.9 version)

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Moor Terces
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(Last edited by Moor Terces; 5th April 2014 at 09:12 PM.)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bournezhang View Post
could you show more detail steps to us???
First of all, you have to be kind of crazy to try this and it is very risky, but if your here you've already bricked your Kindle so...

Next, you need to get your mother board out of the Kindle. There are teardown instructions if you do a search. Tip: don't pry on the side with the USB connection. That side of the case has bigger tabs that act almost like a hinge. Also it helps to have a specialized plastic pry tool. I got one from radio shack. After opening the case like a book, carefully unhook the ribbon cables and the rest of the teardown is easy.

You then need to make the interface. Use this post and follow the instructions from kurohyou. These instructions are for the KF2 but the methodology is the same. Making the interface will be identical. For connecting the interface to the motherboard, instead of using the images in that post, use the images of the mother board in the OP of this thread. You need to carefully peal the yellow protective coat off of the back of the motherboard to access the small copper pads. Tip: the VCC connection is daunting but if you put a tiny bit of solder on the tip of the wire and heat only the wire it will stick. You don't need much solder for any of these connections. Use a toothpick to put tiny amounts of flux on each connection. Practice on something else to sharpen your skills before attempting on your Kindle. Also labele your wires before you start to reduce the chance of errors.

Personally, I used a micro SD to SD adapter as that is what I had on hand. A big thanks to lex66676 for posting this image. Either way will work.

Next you will need to get Ubuntu up and running. Forget Windows, it will never recognize the chip. You can create a bootable disk or USB and use Ubuntu on your computer without even installing. Go to the Ubuntu website to find instructions and downloads. Tip: I would do this on a computer with a traditional BIOS rather than the newer UEFI as you will probably have less issues. Also, Windows 7 is easier to boot on external media but it is possible on Win 8 by holding shift while clicking reboot to get to the advanced boot options. Once you have Ubuntu running, mess around with it for awhile to get comfortable.

The moment of truth. Connect your interface and see if it recognizes the chip. Open gparted or the disk utility to see if you see the partitions. Note the name of the partitions. Mine was called /dev/mmblk0p2 for partition 2 then the same ending in 9 for partition 9 etc. (The name might have been something a little different, but I'm not going to take it apart again to get the exact name heh heh.) Tip: Gparted might give you an error regarding the table. That's ok do not attempt to fix it. Gparted should still see the partitions. If Ubuntu doesn't see your chip try another computer. The first computer I tried didn't work. If that doesn't work recheck your connections and make sure you have the right wires to the correct terminals.

Now you need to compile your files. Get a working bootloader from Hashcode here step 2 number 6. It is the 8.1.4 bootloader. Also find a Kindle HD 8.9 boot.IMG and recovery.IMG either from your own backup or from the Kindle Fire First Aid package. I navigated to the home directory of Ubuntu and made a folder called Kindle and added the three files. Now you need to open a terminal and navigate to your folder. Use the command "cd /home/Kindle" and it should point your terminal to the folder with the files in it. Tip: The terminal is case sensitive. Also if you are booting from a live CD or USB it can be finicky. I had to use the xterm for it to work as the normal terminal wouldn't change dir. I also could only move one level at a time by using command "cd /home" and then "cd /Kindle".

Once you are in the right directory you are going to use the dd command to write your files. The red portion will be the name you noted from gparted.

Partition 2 with the bootloader:
Code: sudo dd if=kfhd8-u-boot-prod-8.1.4.bin of=/dev/mmblk0p2 bs=1

Partition 9 with recovery:
Code: dd if=recovery.img of=/dev/mmblk0p9

Partition 10 with boot:
Code: dd if=boot.img of=/dev/mmblk0p10

After running each of those commands, again red being the name your computer gave your chip, you should see some info on how fast it took etc as a confirmation. Shut the computer down, eject the interface and carefully remove your wires. Tip: when your wires are removed if you very quickly touch the small amount of solder left on the pads it will make a tiny smooth bead that you can use if you have to resolder again. Take care not to linger with your iron so you do not overheat the board. Also don't do this to the vcc component as it is just too tight of an area.

After removing the wires, use electrical tape or something similar to cover the exposed pads on the back. Make sure not to cover the copper around the screw holes that were originally exposed. Now put it back together. Remember to slide the side with the USB port in first as it acts as a hinge.

Moment of truth 2! Plug it in to charge as the hard brick completely discharges the battery. For me, after a few minutes I was able to see the charge icon pop up. Walk away and wait awhile as this kindle takes forever to get a charge built up. Come back and hopefully you will see that the kindle is on and running, or at least you can see the kindle fire logo. If there is any life to it you can use the other techniques to get it back up.

Last but not least, do not do the same thing you did to brick it in the first place!!!
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LinearEquation
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moor Terces View Post
First of all, you have to be kind of crazy to try this and it is very risky, but if your here you've already bricked your Kindle so...

Next, you need to get your mother board out of the Kindle. There are teardown instructions if you do a search. Tip: don't pry on the side with the USB connection. That side of the case has bigger tabs that act almost like a hinge. Also it helps to have a specialized plastic pry tool. I got one from radio shack. After opening the case like a book, carefully unhook the ribbon cables and the rest of the teardown is easy.

You then need to make the interface. Use this post and follow the instructions from kurohyou. These instructions are for the KF2 but the methodology is the same. Making the interface will be identical. For connecting the interface to the motherboard, instead of using the images in that post, use the images of the mother board in the OP of this thread. You need to carefully peal the yellow protective coat off of the back of the motherboard to access the small copper pads. Tip: the VCC connection is daunting but if you put a tiny bit of solder on the tip of the wire and heat only the wire it will stick. You don't need much solder for any of these connections. Use a toothpick to put tiny amounts of flux on each connection. Practice on something else to sharpen your skills before attempting on your Kindle. Also labele your wires before you start to reduce the chance of errors.

Personally, I used a micro SD to SD adapter as that is what I had on hand. A big thanks to lex66676 for posting this image. Either way will work.

Next you will need to get Ubuntu up and running. Forget Windows, it will never recognize the chip. You can create a bootable disk or USB and use Ubuntu on your computer without even installing. Go to the Ubuntu website to find instructions and downloads. Tip: I would do this on a computer with a traditional BIOS rather than the newer UEFI as you will probably have less issues. Also, Windows 7 is easier to boot on external media but it is possible on Win 8 by holding shift while clicking reboot to get to the advanced boot options. Once you have Ubuntu running, mess around with it for awhile to get comfortable.

The moment of truth. Connect your interface and see if it recognizes the chip. Open gparted or the disk utility to see if you see the partitions. Note the name of the partitions. Mine was called /dev/mmblk0p2 for partition 2 then the same ending in 9 for partition 9 etc. (The name might have been something a little different, but I'm not going to take it apart again to get the exact name heh heh.) Tip: Gparted might give you an error regarding the table. That's ok do not attempt to fix it. Gparted should still see the partitions. If Ubuntu doesn't see your chip try another computer. The first computer I tried didn't work. If that doesn't work recheck your connections and make sure you have the right wires to the correct terminals.

Now you need to compile your files. Get a working bootloader from Hashcode here step 2 number 6. It is the 8.1.4 bootloader. Also find a Kindle HD 8.9 boot.IMG and recovery.IMG either from your own backup or from the Kindle Fire First Aid package. I navigated to the home directory of Ubuntu and made a folder called Kindle and added the three files. Now you need to open a terminal and navigate to your folder. Use the command "cd /home/Kindle" and it should point your terminal to the folder with the files in it. Tip: The terminal is case sensitive. Also if you are booting from a live CD or USB it can be finicky. I had to use the xterm for it to work as the normal terminal wouldn't change dir. I also could only move one level at a time by using command "cd /home" and then "cd /Kindle".

Once you are in the right directory you are going to use the dd command to write your files. The red portion will be the name you noted from gparted.

Partition 2 with the bootloader:
Code: sudo dd if=kfhd8-u-boot-prod-8.1.4.bin of=/dev/mmblk0p2 bs=1

Partition 9 with recovery:
Code: dd if=recovery.img of=/dev/mmblk0p9

Partition 10 with boot:
Code: dd if=boot.img of=/dev/mmblk0p10

After running each of those commands, again red being the name your computer gave your chip, you should see some info on how fast it took etc as a confirmation. Shut the computer down, eject the interface and carefully remove your wires. Tip: when your wires are removed if you very quickly touch the small amount of solder left on the pads it will make a tiny smooth bead that you can use if you have to resolder again. Take care not to linger with your iron so you do not overheat the board. Also don't do this to the vcc component as it is just too tight of an area.

After removing the wires, use electrical tape or something similar to cover the exposed pads on the back. Make sure not to cover the copper around the screw holes that were originally exposed. Now put it back together. Remember to slide the side with the USB port in first as it acts as a hinge.

Moment of truth 2! Plug it in to charge as the hard brick completely discharges the battery. For me, after a few minutes I was able to see the charge icon pop up. Walk away and wait awhile as this kindle takes forever to get a charge built up. Come back and hopefully you will see that the kindle is on and running, or at least you can see the kindle fire logo. If there is any life to it you can use the other techniques to get it back up.

Last but not least, do not do the same thing you did to brick it in the first place!!!
Rock solid, good deal.

Sent from my Nexus 7 Flo running Odex SinLess ROM 4.4.2 with ElementalX kernel using XDA Premium 4 mobile app
[ROOT]
2013 KFHD7 KFSOWI with firmware 11.x.x.x KFSOWI (no camera/no HDMI output) http://forum.xda-developers.com/show....php?t=2544736 Post 10 at the link has instructions to block Amazon OTA updates on KFHD 7 KFSOWI
Remove Ads from Lockscreen KFHD7 2013 KFSOWI http://forum.xda-developers.com/show...php?p=48623841
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bournezhang
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moor Terces View Post
First of all, you have to be kind of crazy to try this and it is very risky, but if your here you've already bricked your Kindle so...

Next, you need to get your mother board out of the Kindle. There are teardown instructions if you do a search. Tip: don't pry on the side with the USB connection. That side of the case has bigger tabs that act almost like a hinge. Also it helps to have a specialized plastic pry tool. I got one from radio shack. After opening the case like a book, carefully unhook the ribbon cables and the rest of the teardown is easy.

You then need to make the interface. Use this post and follow the instructions from kurohyou. These instructions are for the KF2 but the methodology is the same. Making the interface will be identical. For connecting the interface to the motherboard, instead of using the images in that post, use the images of the mother board in the OP of this thread. You need to carefully peal the yellow protective coat off of the back of the motherboard to access the small copper pads. Tip: the VCC connection is daunting but if you put a tiny bit of solder on the tip of the wire and heat only the wire it will stick. You don't need much solder for any of these connections. Use a toothpick to put tiny amounts of flux on each connection. Practice on something else to sharpen your skills before attempting on your Kindle. Also labele your wires before you start to reduce the chance of errors.

Personally, I used a micro SD to SD adapter as that is what I had on hand. A big thanks to lex66676 for posting this image. Either way will work.

Next you will need to get Ubuntu up and running. Forget Windows, it will never recognize the chip. You can create a bootable disk or USB and use Ubuntu on your computer without even installing. Go to the Ubuntu website to find instructions and downloads. Tip: I would do this on a computer with a traditional BIOS rather than the newer UEFI as you will probably have less issues. Also, Windows 7 is easier to boot on external media but it is possible on Win 8 by holding shift while clicking reboot to get to the advanced boot options. Once you have Ubuntu running, mess around with it for awhile to get comfortable.

The moment of truth. Connect your interface and see if it recognizes the chip. Open gparted or the disk utility to see if you see the partitions. Note the name of the partitions. Mine was called /dev/mmblk0p2 for partition 2 then the same ending in 9 for partition 9 etc. (The name might have been something a little different, but I'm not going to take it apart again to get the exact name heh heh.) Tip: Gparted might give you an error regarding the table. That's ok do not attempt to fix it. Gparted should still see the partitions. If Ubuntu doesn't see your chip try another computer. The first computer I tried didn't work. If that doesn't work recheck your connections and make sure you have the right wires to the correct terminals.

Now you need to compile your files. Get a working bootloader from Hashcode here step 2 number 6. It is the 8.1.4 bootloader. Also find a Kindle HD 8.9 boot.IMG and recovery.IMG either from your own backup or from the Kindle Fire First Aid package. I navigated to the home directory of Ubuntu and made a folder called Kindle and added the three files. Now you need to open a terminal and navigate to your folder. Use the command "cd /home/Kindle" and it should point your terminal to the folder with the files in it. Tip: The terminal is case sensitive. Also if you are booting from a live CD or USB it can be finicky. I had to use the xterm for it to work as the normal terminal wouldn't change dir. I also could only move one level at a time by using command "cd /home" and then "cd /Kindle".

Once you are in the right directory you are going to use the dd command to write your files. The red portion will be the name you noted from gparted.

Partition 2 with the bootloader:
Code: sudo dd if=kfhd8-u-boot-prod-8.1.4.bin of=/dev/mmblk0p2 bs=1

Partition 9 with recovery:
Code: dd if=recovery.img of=/dev/mmblk0p9

Partition 10 with boot:
Code: dd if=boot.img of=/dev/mmblk0p10

After running each of those commands, again red being the name your computer gave your chip, you should see some info on how fast it took etc as a confirmation. Shut the computer down, eject the interface and carefully remove your wires. Tip: when your wires are removed if you very quickly touch the small amount of solder left on the pads it will make a tiny smooth bead that you can use if you have to resolder again. Take care not to linger with your iron so you do not overheat the board. Also don't do this to the vcc component as it is just too tight of an area.

After removing the wires, use electrical tape or something similar to cover the exposed pads on the back. Make sure not to cover the copper around the screw holes that were originally exposed. Now put it back together. Remember to slide the side with the USB port in first as it acts as a hinge.

Moment of truth 2! Plug it in to charge as the hard brick completely discharges the battery. For me, after a few minutes I was able to see the charge icon pop up. Walk away and wait awhile as this kindle takes forever to get a charge built up. Come back and hopefully you will see that the kindle is on and running, or at least you can see the kindle fire logo. If there is any life to it you can use the other techniques to get it back up.

Last but not least, do not do the same thing you did to brick it in the first place!!!

thanks for your so detail information
its seems a little complex
in fact,there's some easy way we don't know, maybe the RD of amazon or TI knew
 
Moor Terces
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With the way this Kindle is set up once the bootloader is messed up, there is no way to communicate with the device. I doubt even Amazon would be able to fix it without removing the motherboard. Extreme measures for an extremely jacked up device.

Sent from my Amazon Jem using Tapatalk
 
stunts513
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They have access to the nice usbboot utility or equivelent, they don't need to solder much, just to short the contact if it isn't already showing up as a omap device, though they have the signed aboot file we don't so it would make things much simpler for them.

Sent from my Amazon Kindle Fire HD using Tapatalk
My Wallpaper Fix for KF2, KFHD 7", and KFHD 8.9" is HERE
Please Read the instructions and use the debugger if you run into errors.
My own modified adb drivers for just about all kindles (includes old twrp and cm versions) HERE
Tablet UI Patch for latest CM10.1 build HERE!

Please send complaints to /dev/null
 
bournezhang
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moor Terces View Post
With the way this Kindle is set up once the bootloader is messed up, there is no way to communicate with the device. I doubt even Amazon would be able to fix it without removing the motherboard. Extreme measures for an extremely jacked up device.

Sent from my Amazon Jem using Tapatalk
The SW or HW of amazon has some nice way to flash the bootloader with shorting some pin of the motherboard.
maybe two pin, then you can make a bridge between the computer and KF

---------- Post added at 02:31 PM ---------- Previous post was at 02:26 PM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by Moor Terces View Post
With the way this Kindle is set up once the bootloader is messed up, there is no way to communicate with the device. I doubt even Amazon would be able to fix it without removing the motherboard. Extreme measures for an extremely jacked up device.

Sent from my Amazon Jem using Tapatalk
thanks for Moor Terces, kurohyou ,v0id7 and all the person in this post
thanks for your hard work, I think this issue is closed.
U are the super man in my eyes.
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bournezhang
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Moor Terces View Post
I have now officially successfully used this technique to un-hard brick my Kindle HD 8.9.

Here is what worked for me. I used a micro SD to SD adapter to make the interface as that is all I had, and also you don't have to worry about the card switch. The soldering is a little tricky but doable. By far the hardest is the tiny VCCQ connection.

After successfully getting Ubuntu to see the chip I originally flashed only the u.boot.bin file from the most recent Amazon OS. After putting it back together it didn't work. I took it apart again and then flashed the 2nd partition with the "kfhd8-u-boot-prod-8.1.4.bin" found here on the forum with the bs=1 command at the end of the terminal command. I also flashed the recovery partition and the boot partition with .img files I had backed up. I did not use the bs=1 command for these two flashes.

After putting it back together and plugging it in I saw the low battery charge image pop up. After charging a bit the Kindle came back to life! It is now working.

Bottom line, I can confirm that IT WORKS!

hi Moor,need U more help
i follow your step,but not success
1 'recognizes the chip'-----could u give more information
2 ' Open gparted or the disk utility'-----i don't know how to install gparted, with the disk utility i didn't find the partitions
so if has other tools to get the partitions information
3 how i can know flash successful?
thanks
 
stunts513
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bournezhang View Post
hi Moor,need U more help
i follow your step,but not success
1 'recognizes the chip'-----could u give more information
2 ' Open gparted or the disk utility'-----i don't know how to install gparted, with the disk utility i didn't find the partitions
so if has other tools to get the partitions information
3 how i can know flash successful?
thanks
ok well, gparted is installed on the live cd by default last i checked, however if its not or you are on the installed version of ubuntu then run "sudo apt-get install gparted" in a terminal to install it, if you want to run it without searching for it then try "sudo gparted" in a terminal. You will know if the chip was recognized by linux once gparted is open, possibly before if you look for basic signs of a new drive being detected. And you should assume the flash is sucessfull after you run the command and it finishes, but you really won't know until you boot the device up.
My Wallpaper Fix for KF2, KFHD 7", and KFHD 8.9" is HERE
Please Read the instructions and use the debugger if you run into errors.
My own modified adb drivers for just about all kindles (includes old twrp and cm versions) HERE
Tablet UI Patch for latest CM10.1 build HERE!

Please send complaints to /dev/null
 
Moor Terces
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Stunts513 is right, gparted is included in the Ubuntu download. If you have never used Ubuntu it can be a little confusing at first. There are some guides around the web if you do a search. Once you flash the chip, the terminal should show some info on how big the file was and how long it took to flash. Since you didn't use gparted or the disk utility, were you able to find the name your computer assigned your chip? Depending on the drives attached or whether you used a USB card reader or the mini SD adapter the name the computer gives the chip could vary by quite a bit. If it makes you feel any better, it took me two times to get it to work. The soldering was much easier the second time around ;D

Sent from my Amazon Jem using Tapatalk

Tags
emmc, hard-bricked, kindle fire 8.9, repair, soldering
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