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[Q] Phosphorus in the screen?

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numskull
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperMarioGalaxy View Post
Erica Griffin stated that they use phosphorus in the screen of the Sony Z2.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SS5DlQIhLTM

Can anyone confirm this? Do they use phosphorous substances in the screen? Is this phosphorus radioactive? Way back the use of (some form of) phosphorus was banned in watches etc. because it destroys your eyes.
I like how you mentioned "some form of", im no businessman but im pretty sure that a global company, creating a product for a global market, are NOT going to use banned substances in said product...... im assuming they used "some other form of"......... besides sony are so far in the red, they aint gonna risk anything that means they may have to pay out
 
ste1164
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As schecter7 said its phosphor not phosphorus. http://www.sonymobile.com/global-en/.../#best-display http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/tv6.htm quick guide on how they work in old CRT monitors. Phosphors and phosphorus are two different things. I haven't heard the video but she either mispronounced it or you misheard.
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HeartUnderBlade
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(Last edited by HeartUnderBlade; 5th May 2014 at 06:42 PM.)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SuperMarioGalaxy View Post
Erica Griffin stated that they use phosphorus in the screen of the Sony Z2.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SS5DlQIhLTM

Can anyone confirm this? Do they use phosphorous substances in the screen? Is this phosphorus radioactive? Way back the use of (some form of) phosphorus was banned in watches etc. because it destroys your eyes.
OP, please watch the video again. She mentions at 5:35 that they use "red and green PHOSPHOR" (so no, she didn't mispronounce it. You just misheard it). Despite sharing a similar name, they are both different. Phosphorus emits light using chemiluminescence while phosphor does not. Stop worrying so much but if you want, you're more than welcome to not buy the device and tell your friends to not buy it. Less demand = more stock for other people wanting the phone!
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TheOnlyIntruder
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Originally Posted by HeartUnderBlade View Post
OP, please watch the video again. She mentions at 5:35 that they use "red and green PHOSPHOR" (so no, she didn't mispronounce it. You just misheard it). Despite sharing a similar name, they are both different. Phosphorus emits light using chemiluminescence while phosphor does not. Stop worrying so much but if you want, you're more than welcome to not buy the device and tell your friends to not buy it. Less demand = more stock for other people wanting the phone!
That's even better then, there is no need to worry at all now
Phone History: -
Ericsson A1018s > Ericsson T20e > Nokia 3510i > Motorola V600 > Motorola V3x > Sony Ericsson K800i > Sony Ericsson Xperia X1 > HTC Desire > HTC One X > Sony Xperia Z2 (Current)
 
BanziBaby
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@Publicglutton I'm so jealous mate, been so long since been able to partake

Damn so that means I can't start a class action lawsuit against Sony on behalf of irradiated spermatozoa everywhere, pity as I already "knocked off" a few samples for the suit
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SuperMarioGalaxy
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Originally Posted by schecter7 View Post
Hey OP, It's phosphor - not phosphorous. Plasma and many other displays use those.In fact, Panasonic's VT/ZT series use fast switching phosphors and those are simply the best TVs in the market. They are not harmful as long as you don't break the glass and start poking at them with your finger. Same thing applies to batteries. You can chillax now.
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Originally Posted by ste1164 View Post
As schecter7 said its phosphor not phosphorus. http://www.sonymobile.com/global-en/.../#best-display http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/tv6.htm quick guide on how they work in old CRT monitors. Phosphors and phosphorus are two different things. I haven't heard the video but she either mispronounced it or you misheard.
The chemical element is phosphorus, not phosphoroUs. English is not my native language so I don't know what they call what. Where I'm from phosphor would probably be the name for both of them. Phosphorus was the first wiki article I found when searching for phosphor so I figured she mispronounced it. It seems it is a phosphor that is used, which is a general term for luminescent substances. Now I'm not sure which phosphorous substance was used back in the day but I think what is used now is safe.

Quote:
Originally Posted by HeartUnderBlade View Post
OP, please watch the video again. She mentions at 5:35 that they use "red and green PHOSPHOR" (so no, she didn't mispronounce it. You just misheard it). Despite sharing a similar name, they are both different. Phosphorus emits light using chemiluminescence while phosphor does not. Stop worrying so much but if you want, you're more than welcome to not buy the device and tell your friends to not buy it. Less demand = more stock for other people wanting the phone!
I heard it right the first time, I thought she mispronounced it. They are different terms for different things like I explained above. And actually its the other way around of what you said. Phosphor substances (there are tons) emit light, phosphorus, the chemical element (there is only one) does not. It would make no sense to use a non-light-emitting substance in a display, don't you think?

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Originally Posted by numskull View Post
I like how you mentioned "some form of", im no businessman but im pretty sure that a global company, creating a product for a global market, are NOT going to use banned substances in said product...... im assuming they used "some other form of"......... besides sony are so far in the red, they aint gonna risk anything that means they may have to pay out
Yes, but misses happen.

I have made my peace with this. The phosphors used nowadays are not harmful. I'm still holding strongly on my preorder and hope to get it soon.
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HeartUnderBlade
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(Last edited by HeartUnderBlade; 5th May 2014 at 10:42 PM.) Reason: corrections
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Originally Posted by SuperMarioGalaxy View Post
I heard it right the first time, I thought she mispronounced it. They are different terms for different things like I explained above. And actually its the other way around of what you said. Phosphor substances (there are tons) emit light, phosphorus, the chemical element (there is only one) does not. It would make no sense to use a non-light-emitting substance in a display, don't you think?
I understand English is not your first language so I won't argue with you. However, I never said Phosphor doesn't emit light. I said Phosphor does not emit light through chemiluminescence which is what Phosphorus is. Phosphorus emits light through a chemiluminscent reaction when white phosphorus oxidizes in moist air.

So no, it is exactly as I said and not the other way around. The "other way around" would be saying that phosphor emits light through a chemiluminscent reaction which is false. Emitting light through a chemiluminscent reaction is what phosphorus does.

Read the last line before the table of contents:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphor

Read the first point in Gas-phase reactions section:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemiluminescence

Hopefully you don't take this comment as being too defensive but I felt the need to correct you who tried to correct me lol. Although I do apologize, the way I worded it made it sound like I said phosphor does not emit light especially to someone who may not have English as their native language.
 
SuperMarioGalaxy
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Originally Posted by HeartUnderBlade View Post
I understand English is not your first language so I won't argue with you. However, I never said Phosphor doesn't emit light. I said Phosphor does not emit light through chemiluminescence which is what Phosphorus is. Phosphorus emits light through a chemiluminscent reaction when white phosphorus oxidizes in moist air.

So no, it is exactly as I said and not the other way around. The "other way around" would be saying that phosphor emits light through a chemiluminscent reaction which is false. Emitting light through a chemiluminscent reaction is what phosphorus does.

Read the last line before the table of contents:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phosphor

Read the first point in Gas-phase reactions section:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chemiluminescence

Hopefully you don't take this comment as being too defensive but I felt the need to correct you who tried to correct me lol. Although I do apologize, the way I worded it made it sound like I said phosphor does not emit light especially to someone who may not have English as their native language.
No harm done. I stand corrected. Honestly I wouldn't have known this even if English was my first language and I don't think that was the problem here (we use similar sentence structures). I didn't pay enough attention to what you said. I just read -luminescent (didn't know there were so many types of luminescence) and that phosphor doesn't emit light. Also I thought phosphorus doesn't emit light, but apparently it does, although not by itself. Sorry.

PS. Ironically, phosphorus is not a phosphor. Hehe.

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