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HELP! Broken screen glass

OP thatblokematti

16th May 2014, 01:50 PM   |  #11  
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I've read the screen is glued to the LCD. How hard is it to heat and take that off? I'd love if someone knew of a repair service for the 2014 Edition not the old one.
17th May 2014, 08:20 AM   |  #12  
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Less hassle:


Details about Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 2014 Edition P600 P601 P605 LCD Screen+Touch Digitizer

: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Samsung-Gala...item3389f72d01
17th May 2014, 08:47 PM   |  #13  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by dt33

Less hassle:



Details about Samsung Galaxy Note 10.1 2014 Edition P600 P601 P605 LCD Screen+Touch Digitizer

: http://www.ebay.com/itm/Samsung-Gala...item3389f72d01


personally, this is what I would do.
20th May 2014, 10:34 PM   |  #14  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by random45

personally, this is what I would do.

It's also way more expensive. How do you go about ungluing something like this tablet? Do you need professional tools to do this
25th May 2014, 06:58 PM   |  #15  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by thatblokematti

It's also way more expensive. How do you go about ungluing something like this tablet? Do you need professional tools to do this

Well if you buy the whole replacement you don't need professional tools. Just screwdrivers.
10th June 2014, 05:09 AM   |  #16  
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Don't need professional tools!
Quote:
Originally Posted by thatblokematti

It's also way more expensive. How do you go about ungluing something like this tablet? Do you need professional tools to do this

Firstly, anybody can do bonded screen replacements without professional tools.
The most important tool you will need is patience and determination.

I repair phones, tablets and laptops. While professional tools will make the job easier and give a better quality result, it is possible to get professional results without expensive tools.
I'm not going to go into dismantling device, you can find plenty of instructions on doing that for various devices.
I will cover just the bonded screen issue.
Apart from the replacement glass/ddigitizer,
These are the things you may need and they are all cheap:
1. Molybdenum wire - around $10 for a couple of 100m rolls
2. Plastic Playing cards
3. Non serated plastic knife
4. Hairdryer or heatgun, or an iron (yes, ordinary clothes iron)
5. Infrared thermometer ($40 or so) - not essential but very handy
6. Loca glue
7. UV lamp
8. Couple pairs of small pliers or something to grip the molybdenum wire
9. Cleaning alcohol, or metholated spirits will do.

Once you have removed the screen assembly with the LCD, you need to heat the bonding from the glass side with the hairdryer or iron.
I prefer using the iron set at the right temperature which you can use the thermometer to check. Start at around 90deg C.
Hairdryer will also work, but you can't regulate the temp accurately.
Get the glass up around 90 and start working a corner with a short length of moly wire and grip it using the pliers.
You could fabricate handles for the cutting wires using wooden chopsticks or something but I prefer pliers as the wire will break often and its easy to regrip using pliers.
As you work the wire in, follow behind using the playing cards to keep the glass seperated.
Don't get frustrated if the wire breaks often, expect it!
As you get good at it, you get a feel for the strength of the wire and will break less.
Also try a little more heat for some devices as they have tougher glue but don't go too hot or it will damage LCD.
Once you have cut right through and seperated it, clean the remaining glue off using alcohol and a bit of hairdryer heat and just gently rolling the glue into lumps.
Once its nice and clean, apply the LOCA glue in a double Y like this >---< and gently just lower the new glass on it.
You might need to make a stencil for alignment to locate the glass precisely.
You can do this using cardboard and tape before removing the old broken glass.
I cannot stress the importance of precise alignment, so use your head and innovation to achieve accuracy.
Professionally, we use prefab brackets to align the LCD and glass digitizer, but it can be done with a bit of ingenuity and cardboard.
Don't press down on the loca at first, just let it spread under the weight of the glass.
Work any bubbles out gently and if you need to, use the plastic knife to seperate the glass a little bit and rework.
Once its all good, apply some pressure and let excess LOCA ooze out and wipre it off.
Apply sticky tape to fix the glass in alignment to LCD.
When it's all good, put the UV lamp on it for about 10mins
If you don't have a UV lamp, you can cure it in sunlight for a few hours.
You can get the UV lamps they use for nail salons for $30 or if you are a whiz, you could buy the UV tube for $2 and hack a flouro lamp to power it.
You should end up with a screen that looks new!

PS. Before attempting this on an expensive tablet for the first time, try and get a junked phone with bonded screen and do it on that first for a bit of practice. The experience will be worth it to get better results on the real deal.
The worst you can do is stuff up the LCD and you were going to get the complete LCD digitizer combo anyway right?
Last edited by warboat; 10th June 2014 at 05:26 AM.
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broken, broken screen, diy, samsung
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