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What is the cleanest way to install updates?

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C5Longhorn
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(Last edited by C5Longhorn; 29th June 2014 at 11:15 PM.) Reason: added info.
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Default What is the cleanest way to install updates?

I'm fairly new to Android and the Nexus 7. I am unlocked, rooted, and have installed Ti Backup. I just recently received the OTA for 4.4.4 and installed it, and then manually loaded TWRP back and rerooted.

This doesn't seem like the cleanest install (maybe it's my OCD tendencies with hardware and software), so I'm wondering what is the best way to install Android updates? Should I reset to the factory image and then use Ti back up for all my apps? Is the way I proceeded just as good as other possible methods? My goal is to follow a plan that will support the 7 performing as best as possible.

Any info or opinions would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Rick
 
mdamaged
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Quote:
Originally Posted by C5Longhorn View Post
I'm fairly new to Android and the Nexus 7. I am unlocked, rooted, and have installed Ti Backup. I just recently received the OTA for 4.4.4 and installed it, and then manually loaded TWRP back and rerooted.

This doesn't seem like the cleanest install (maybe it's my OCD tendencies with hardware and software), so I'm wondering what is the best way to install Android updates? Should I reset to the factory image and then use Ti back up for all my apps? Is the way I proceeded just as good as other possible methods? My goal is to follow a plan that will support the 7 performing as best as possible.

Any info or opinions would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Rick
I prefer using multirom. What I do, is wait for a flashable full version of the latest and greatest stock from Tasssadar (he usually has one the same day or 2), then flash it as secondary, root it, install xposed, gb, and a couple other modules and viper4android, qualcom dalvik and bionic patches, flash elementalx, go into primary, make backups with TiB, go into recovery and do a complete nandroid, put them onto my meenova (and pc), delete all the big apps that take up a lot of room, then boot into secondary, restore android ID with TiB, install only small apps I need (I prefer reinstalling instead of restoring from backup), then use TiB to restore app data only (only the things I need) and wifi networks, once I am satisfied with it being complete, I use multiroms swap rom function to swap secondary to primary, then confirm it works, then I delete the secondary (which is the old version), then I install and restore data for the big items. If you have a 32GB N7, you probably can be more careless with the deleting of big app data.

This way I get a clean start, loose nothing and have multple ways of going back if I need to, also I can take my time restoring stuff and still use my working older version until I am ready.
Kenneth, what is the frequency? Set a fire for a man, and he will stay warm for a night. Set a man on fire, and he will stay warm for the rest of his life.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Senchay
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Quote:
Originally Posted by C5Longhorn View Post
I'm fairly new to Android and the Nexus 7. I am unlocked, rooted, and have installed Ti Backup. I just recently received the OTA for 4.4.4 and installed it, and then manually loaded TWRP back and rerooted.

This doesn't seem like the cleanest install (maybe it's my OCD tendencies with hardware and software), so I'm wondering what is the best way to install Android updates? Should I reset to the factory image and then use Ti back up for all my apps? Is the way I proceeded just as good as other possible methods? My goal is to follow a plan that will support the 7 performing as best as possible.

Any info or opinions would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Rick
Well, i think it depends a bit on what kind of update it is. Usually the "smaller OTA updates (like 4.3.1 to 4.3.2) doesnt wipe your system, so all you have to do is re-root it again (if you want). All Apps and Data is kept. If the update is one that changes the Android Version like 4.1 to 4.3 (wich wont happen on the Nexus) then i would suggest a factory-reset before and maybe even after again, yes.


Off topic a bit: To be honest, i never bothered with backup systems because i somehow doesnt feel its a good idea but that is really my own thinking, im very aware that many ppl use backups successfully.

Games i play are usually saved on the server anyway, contacts, emails and all that are automatically there anyway if you use a google account and if your system is set to automatically restoe apps then all the apps get automatically downloaded again anyway.

Somehow i dont seem to use a single app that needs data to be backed up. And theres none that comes to my mind, besides savegames of non-server-saved games probably. But for that theres Helium. The cloud (be it "owncloud" or the official ones) saves me all this trouble with backups.
 
espionage724
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For the cleanest install I can think of (and usually do myself):

1. Grab latest factory image from Google and extract it so you're left with a folder with scripts and stuff (can be 4.4.4, or even L preview atm; folder should look similar to razor-lpv79)

2. Get platform-tools (either straight from Android SDK or from a trusted location (do not use a toolkit) ; make sure it's up-to-date, and for a good idea, add the executable path to PATH)

3. Boot N7 to Bootloader (power it off, hold vol down + power)

4. Unlock bootloader via fastboot oem unlock (confirm it on N7 with vol and power buttons)

5. Run flash-all.bat found in the factory image folder (fastboot executable either needs to be put into that folder, or you need it on PATH already)

6. Watch the tablet and wait for it to reboot, immediately when it reboots, hold vol down and go back to bootloader

7. Do fastboot oem lock to re-lock the bootloader

8. Boot to recovery

9. Clean Cache, then Data/Factory Reset (in that order)

10. Reboot

11. Profit

That process should ensure future updates work without issue or snag But of course you'd lose root. You probably don't have to re-lock the bootloader though.


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Current Devices:
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Galaxy Rush (SPH-M830) (Stock)

Ex Devices:
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Galaxy Tab 2 7.0 (GT-P3113)
Galaxy Prevail (SPH-M820) (KoumaKernel + CTMod)
Nexus 4 (LGE960/mako) (franco.Kernel + RasSaber)
Nexus 10 (GT-P8110/manta) (franco.Kernel + RasSaber
 
mdamaged
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Quote:
Originally Posted by espionage724 View Post
For the cleanest install I can think of (and usually do myself):

1. Grab latest factory image from Google and extract it so you're left with a folder with scripts and stuff (can be 4.4.4, or even L preview atm; folder should look similar to razor-lpv79)

2. Get platform-tools (either straight from Android SDK or from a trusted location (do not use a toolkit) ; make sure it's up-to-date, and for a good idea, add the executable path to PATH)

3. Boot N7 to Bootloader (power it off, hold vol down + power)

4. Unlock bootloader via fastboot oem unlock (confirm it on N7 with vol and power buttons)

5. Run flash-all.bat found in the factory image folder (fastboot executable either needs to be put into that folder, or you need it on PATH already)

6. Watch the tablet and wait for it to reboot, immediately when it reboots, hold vol down and go back to bootloader

7. Do fastboot oem lock to re-lock the bootloader

8. Boot to recovery

9. Clean Cache, then Data/Factory Reset (in that order)

10. Reboot

11. Profit

That process should ensure future updates work without issue or snag But of course you'd lose root. You probably don't have to re-lock the bootloader though.


In fact, unless it's going back to the factory I'd recommend never relocking it.
Kenneth, what is the frequency? Set a fire for a man, and he will stay warm for a night. Set a man on fire, and he will stay warm for the rest of his life.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
espionage724
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mdamaged View Post

In fact, unless it's going back to the factory I'd recommend never relocking it.
It's not really too much trouble to unlock it again, but if anything, re-locking it can be pretty nice from a security-standpoint.

I mainly just re-lock it just to keep that Google experience


Device Ownership:
 

Current Devices:
None
Side Devices:
Nexus 7 (grouper) (franco.Kernel + Rasbeanjelly)
Galaxy Rush (SPH-M830) (Stock)

Ex Devices:
Galaxy Tab 7.0 (SGH-T849)
Galaxy Tab 2 7.0 (GT-P3113)
Galaxy Prevail (SPH-M820) (KoumaKernel + CTMod)
Nexus 4 (LGE960/mako) (franco.Kernel + RasSaber)
Nexus 10 (GT-P8110/manta) (franco.Kernel + RasSaber
 
mdamaged
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Quote:
Originally Posted by espionage724 View Post
It's not really too much trouble to unlock it again, but if anything, re-locking it can be pretty nice from a security-standpoint.

I mainly just re-lock it just to keep that Google experience
To each their own I guess.
Kenneth, what is the frequency? Set a fire for a man, and he will stay warm for a night. Set a man on fire, and he will stay warm for the rest of his life.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
C5Longhorn
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Thanks to all who responded. Good info and ideas on installs. I may end up doing a clean install and following the methods you all mentioned. Right now, I'm monitoring the performance to see if anything further is necessary.

Thanks,

Rick
 
wantabe
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(Last edited by wantabe; 2nd July 2014 at 07:08 PM.)
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Quote:
Originally Posted by espionage724 View Post
It's not really too much trouble to unlock it again, but if anything, re-locking it can be pretty nice from a security-standpoint.

I mainly just re-lock it just to keep that Google experience
I agree that it's not too much trouble to unlock the bootloader BUT... you will completely wipe your entire device everytime you unlock the bootloader! There is only one way that I know of to get around that. "BootUnlocker for Nexus Devices" is supposed to be able to unlock the bootloader without wiping the device but for it to work you will have had to unlock the bootloader to gain root beforehand, then you can use the app to lock unlock. I've never used "BootUnlocker for Nexus Devices" so I can't make any claims as to how well it works or if it will continue to work after future updates. If you ever want to fastboot flash the factory image or parts of a factory image the bootloader will need to be unlocked. And as far as I know to flash images with a toolkit (I don't use any) like Wug's the bootloader needs to be unlocked. Unlocked bootloader from a security standpoint? You're absolutely right that there is a risk! IF your device physically ends up in someone else's possession. We do have the "Android Device Manager" now that gives the ability to locate and wipe our devices. And, I have an additional theft warranty provided by Ruger so I don't spend much time worrying about losing any devices. ; ) There are much bigger security risks from just being rooted and/or having "unknown sources" enabled, web exploits and sideloaded apps. Unless you leave your device completely stock and unrooted, relocking your bootloader can create a significant hurdle that needs to be overcome to solve problems, especially for inexperienced android users. For what it's not worth, just my 2 cents! ; )

Update: after doing some research and installing BootUnlocker it seems to work well! Sweet! I don't need it and prefer to just stay unlocked so I'm deleting the app. Downside of having a locked bootloader is if you can't boot up and want to flash the system or factory images you'll need to "fastboot oem unlock" which equals "wiped device"

Quote:
Originally Posted by C5Longhorn View Post
I'm fairly new to Android and the Nexus 7. I am unlocked, rooted, and have installed Ti Backup. I just recently received the OTA for 4.4.4 and installed it, and then manually loaded TWRP back and rerooted.

This doesn't seem like the cleanest install (maybe it's my OCD tendencies with hardware and software), so I'm wondering what is the best way to install Android updates? Should I reset to the factory image and then use Ti back up for all my apps? Is the way I proceeded just as good as other possible methods? My goal is to follow a plan that will support the 7 performing as best as possible.

Any info or opinions would be appreciated.

Thanks,

Rick
I think you and I feel the same way about OTA updates. I've always felt that flashing the factory image will provide a much more consistent and reliable result. I'm not a big fan of using the OTA's but do use them occasionally for very small updates like 4.4.4. Usually the bigger OTA updates will fail because I have too many modified files in the system and because they are bigger I would rather flash the image anyway. Generally, for the most part, I will open the factory image and pull (extract) from there the specific images that were updated in the OTA and fastboot flash those. On the N7 only the system image was changed with the 4.4.4 update. The 4.4.3 update changed the boot and system images. You can either flash the images that are needed for the update individually or the whole factory image. Flashing the individual images will not wipe your storage, settings or user apps and the factory image Can also be flashed without wiping your storage, or losing your installed apps and settings. When you extract the factory image you will see;
bootloader-flo-flo-04.02.img
flash-all.bat
flash-all.sh
flash-base.sh
image-razor-ktu84p.zip

Inside the "image-razor-ktu84p.zip" is where you will see the individual images;
android-info.txt
boot.img
cache.img
recovery.img
system.img
userdata.img

To flash the factory image without wiping data all you have to do is open up the 'flash-all.bat' with editpad lite or whatever notepad you use and remove the -w from the text. The -w flag will cause the userdata.img to be flashed which wipes your device. If you really want to make sure the os is clean you can do a factory reset with TWRP after flashing the images which will wipe the cache, data and dalvik and remove any settings but will leave your storage intact. I seldom do that though. If you are using a custom recovery it will be replaced with the stock recovery image when you flash the factory image which is why I generally flash the images separately. Not a big deal though because it only takes a few seconds to fastboot flash a custom recovery. My bootloader is always unlocked and I always have TWRP installed on my devices. Leaving TWRP installed gives the ability to flash an OTA that you sideloaded if you don't want to wait for it to get to your device. When you flash the system image, factory image or an OTA you will always lose the supersu binary which causes you to lose root. Before booting up after flashing the images you can go into your custom recovery and flash the supersu zip to regain root. Which is what I always do and I always leave a recent copy of the supersu zip on my devices. I always recommend learning how to use adb/fastboot, toolkits work fine for a lot of people but learning adb/fastboot is not hard and gives you more options and a better understanding of what is being done. A lot of problems you see posted here in the forums are from inexperienced users that are using toolkits. Just saying! ; )
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C5Longhorn
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Thanks for the response. I'm actually going back to just using adb/fastboot and flashing. I seem to run into more hiccups using toolkits that just a command line window.

Rick

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