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msm-dcvs vs ondemand CPU governors

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By shinesthru, Senior Member on 25th July 2012, 05:27 AM
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Between these 2 governors, has anyone noticed a significant advantage as far as battery life goes?
 
 
25th July 2012, 11:00 PM |#2  
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Originally Posted by shinesthru

Between these 2 governors, has anyone noticed a significant advantage as far as battery life goes?

Hopefully more people respond to this, as I'd like to know more details around the msm-dcvs governor. I had it enabled in Clark's 0.0.6 ROM, and I noticed it was pretty much locked at right around 1000-1500mhz. It wouldn't scale below that. I don't know if it was something in the ROM or not, but I used Voltage Control to scale the min down to 352mhz or whatever it is.

I changed the governor to ondemand and set as boot as service (was getting errors creating the init.d script) and it seems to be functioning fine now.
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28th July 2012, 01:58 PM |#3  
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I've been using the msm-dcvs governor in CyanogenMod, and I've actually been having the opposite experience. It seems to max out around 1134MHz most of the time, though CPU Spy shows that higher clock speeds are being used, but rarely. The rest of the time is spent mostly around 384MHz. I haven't really tested it fully yet, let alone against ondemand. I'm going to keep using msm-dcvs since Qualcomm made it specifically to take advantage of our processors' scaling and voltage features. I haven't had any problems.
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7th September 2012, 05:46 PM |#4  
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Originally Posted by EndlessDissent

I've been using the msm-dcvs governor in CyanogenMod, and I've actually been having the opposite experience. It seems to max out around 1134MHz most of the time, though CPU Spy shows that higher clock speeds are being used, but rarely. The rest of the time is spent mostly around 384MHz. I haven't really tested it fully yet, let alone against ondemand. I'm going to keep using msm-dcvs since Qualcomm made it specifically to take advantage of our processors' scaling and voltage features. I haven't had any problems.

What has your battery life been like?
7th September 2012, 06:16 PM |#5  
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Originally Posted by jhavron

What has your battery life been like?

Well, I've actually been forced away from msm-dcvs because there is a bug in the AOSP Jelly Bean implementation, and none of the devs involved with either CM or other AOSP projects will acknowledge that the problem exists, let alone fix it. So, I've been using the Ktoonservative governor. It's working pretty well for now, but I'd prefer if msm-dcvs just got fixed instead
7th September 2012, 06:35 PM |#6  
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Originally Posted by EndlessDissent

Well, I've actually been forced away from msm-dcvs because there is a bug in the AOSP Jelly Bean implementation, and none of the devs involved with either CM or other AOSP projects will acknowledge that the problem exists, let alone fix it. So, I've been using the Ktoonservative governor. It's working pretty well for now, but I'd prefer if msm-dcvs just got fixed instead

Out of curiosity, what problems were you having? I have Voltage Control set to apply noop/ondemand at startup, but I just temp changed it back to msm-dcvs for kicks to see how it goes. I know it's the stock governor that came with the phone, so I'd like to stick with that if possible.

I thought I remembered seeing the speeds always be towards the higher end before, but I'll run it again now and see what happens. I'm using FreeGS3, v0.1.1 right now for what it's worth.
7th September 2012, 09:58 PM |#7  
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Originally Posted by hayzooos

Out of curiosity, what problems were you having? I have Voltage Control set to apply noop/ondemand at startup, but I just temp changed it back to msm-dcvs for kicks to see how it goes. I know it's the stock governor that came with the phone, so I'd like to stick with that if possible.

I thought I remembered seeing the speeds always be towards the higher end before, but I'll run it again now and see what happens. I'm using FreeGS3, v0.1.1 right now for what it's worth.

With the stock CM10 kernel, as soon as I touch the screen, the frequency jumps to 1134MHz and stays there until you turn the screen off. Then, it drops to the min. speed until you turn on and touch the screen again, at which point it jumps back to 1134MHz and locks itself there.

With the KT747 kernel, the speed more-or-less limits itself to 702MHz, and it's nearly impossible to make it scale any higher. KToonsez refuses to acknowledge the problem, so it won't be fixed anytime soon.

I've gotten CPU Spy graph screenshots to illustrate the problems (comparing the stock ROM to AOSP ROMs while doing the same task), but all parties still deny the problems exist. I don't really know what to do to get them to fix it at this point, so I just gave up. I'm hoping it's just some JB driver issue and it'll be fixed when the official JB kernel source is released.
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