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[OFFICIAL] questions and answers for Microsoft surface

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26th December 2012, 08:08 AM   |  #21  
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Really, don't let the stylus decide it for you. If you like the Surface RT, get it!
26th December 2012, 12:55 PM   |  #22  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by C-Lang

Really, don't let the stylus decide it for you. If you like the Surface RT, get it!

I think you right, I will just get one, thanks for your advise.
26th December 2012, 01:58 PM   |  #23  
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Hey guys, I have a question...

How can I play videos direcly from USB? It's not working... When I plug any flash drive or external HDD, I can only explore the files, but can't play the videos. Am I doing anything wrong?
27th December 2012, 12:52 AM   |  #24  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by paulinodf

Hey guys, I have a question...

How can I play videos direcly from USB? It's not working... When I plug any flash drive or external HDD, I can only explore the files, but can't play the videos. Am I doing anything wrong?

What format are the videos in?
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27th December 2012, 12:09 PM   |  #25  
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What happens when you double-click the videos? For supported formats, the relevant app (typically the built-in app) should start up and play them. For unsupported formats, you should get a prompt offering to search the Store for a compatible app. Of course, it's possible for the container (which is the usual source of the file extension, stuff like ".avi" or ".mov") to be supported, but the video and/or audio codec within that contain to be not supported. In that case, you should manually open the file with an app that supports that decoder.
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28th December 2012, 02:55 AM   |  #26  
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Security concern using Windows Live ID
Is using your Windows Live ID as an administrative user a legitimate security concern, and, if so, is the security precaution listed below effective on the Surface RT? Part of the reason I ask the question is that I do not fully understand how the BitLocker recovery key process works when it is initially stored on the Microsoft servers.

Proposed Surface Security Precaution.

1. Set-up new User Account. Make it a local account which does not require signing into Microsoft.

2. Change type of new user account to “administrator”from Control Panel.

3. Manage User accounts and change account “type”of Microsoft login account to standard (not administrator).

4. From administrator account back-up BitLocker encryption key (go to control panel, Bitlocker).

5. Use local admin account for any data whichcannot be compromised.

6. Depending on the strength of your password, you should now be protected in the event your data on the Microsoft servers is hacked into or Microsoft is forced to divulge your Windows Live credentials and password.
28th December 2012, 08:58 AM   |  #27  
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In theory, yeah that works. Lots of potential pitfalls, though. Make sure that sensitive data is stored with ACLs that only allow the Admin user access. Don't use UAC to gain access to that data from the non-Admin account via the Admin credentials (this modifies the ACLs). Hope there's no local elevation of privilege vulnerabilities (there are some, whether they're currently known or not).

Mind, these attacks are only relevant in the case of somebody gaining access to your Surface already. Me knowing you Microsoft Account username and password wouldn't let me remotely log into your Surface, for example.
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29th December 2012, 03:56 PM   |  #28  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GoodDayToDie

In theory, yeah that works. Lots of potential pitfalls, though. Make sure that sensitive data is stored with ACLs that only allow the Admin user access. Don't use UAC to gain access to that data from the non-Admin account via the Admin credentials (this modifies the ACLs). Hope there's no local elevation of privilege vulnerabilities (there are some, whether they're currently known or not).

Mind, these attacks are only relevant in the case of somebody gaining access to your Surface already. Me knowing you Microsoft Account username and password wouldn't let me remotely log into your Surface, for example.

Thank you for your response. I wish I could say your answer puts me at ease. The fact you are from Seattle makes me give more credence to your statement about the existing vulnerabilities in the elevation of privileges area. Do you know if a new BitLocker Recovery Key is created when a user establishes a new Local Administrative User Account and changes the Windows Live User account to Non-Admin? If so, when does this happen exactly? I thought I read on the MicroSoft website that a recovery key is only established when signing into MicroSoft for the first time. It seems to me that if its the same BitLocker recovery key after making the User Account changes I talked about as a proposed security procedure, then the ultimate decision as to whether to reveal the contents of my surface may rest with someone other than myself because hackers could steal the recovery key from MicroSoft, or MicroSoft could be forced to provide this recovery key to a third party.

If this concern is valid, or am I missing something here? Could you recommend any procedure for putting the final decision to reveal data back into the Surface owners hands?
29th December 2012, 09:28 PM   |  #29  
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Everything working now, thank you guys.

My challenge now is to make surface run mkv files with subtitles (ANSI condification)
30th December 2012, 12:22 AM   |  #30  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by fairfax777

Thank you for your response. I wish I could say your answer puts me at ease. The fact you are from Seattle makes me give more credence to your statement about the existing vulnerabilities in the elevation of privileges area. Do you know if a new BitLocker Recovery Key is created when a user establishes a new Local Administrative User Account and changes the Windows Live User account to Non-Admin? If so, when does this happen exactly? I thought I read on the MicroSoft website that a recovery key is only established when signing into MicroSoft for the first time. It seems to me that if its the same BitLocker recovery key after making the User Account changes I talked about as a proposed security procedure, then the ultimate decision as to whether to reveal the contents of my surface may rest with someone other than myself because hackers could steal the recovery key from MicroSoft, or MicroSoft could be forced to provide this recovery key to a third party.

If this concern is valid, or am I missing something here? Could you recommend any procedure for putting the final decision to reveal data back into the Surface owners hands?

I would be more concerned about privilege escalation exploits as they run on the device while you are using it and logged in, at which point the drive is unlocked for access already. BitLocker recovery really is more of an aid for someone who has physical access to your device trying to gain access to your files when they do not have a login for the computer. In the old days we used to be able to just boot up a cd or usb stick with Linux or even windows2go and have access to all the files without having to log in to your account. With BitLocker this is a bit harder as a recovery key is needed for this to occur.

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