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nVidia Grid on Nexus 7

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10th January 2013, 03:02 PM   |  #21  
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Shield is actually kinda strange thing to me... It's like they took a 5" tablet and attached an X360 controller to it, nothing special
10th January 2013, 03:29 PM   |  #22  
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Guys, so what is result of yours talking, will be Nvidia grid avilable on nexus 7? When it will be released?
10th January 2013, 07:34 PM   |  #23  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rememe

Guys, so what is result of yours talking, will be Nvidia grid avilable on nexus 7? When it will be released?

Grid should work on a device eqipped with a Tegra processor, and since N7 has Tegra 3 - we should be able to use Grid but first we need somebody with Tegra 4 to share the .apk file of Grid application.

So for now - we wait
10th January 2013, 08:11 PM   |  #24  
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I don't think Shield will really have a problem doing this. I mean it is basically just Remote Desktop on the client end. The Tegra 3 (or 2) should be plenty powerful for an NVIDIA designed app. The WHOLE point to this type of game streaming is so the client can play games that far exceed the specs of the client.

Eventually all PC's will be "nodes" with bare basic hardware to just get you online. All your apps and games will be streamed like this. Basically it will solve the need to constantly upgrade your PC every year. Just like these little $49 Android PC's that can remote desktop into a server desktop and work from there. These Servers are privatized on huge mainframes and power is allocated per need.

I can see companies having different tiers for different level of users such as:

"Personal" for just basic video streaming/internet surfing and light office work.
"Professional" would offer more resources that allow heavy Video streaming 1080p+ (or whatever is in the future)
"Business" for someone who needs a little more umph and exchange/VPN/static IP connectivity.
"Gamer" would be someone that needs lots of graphical horsepower and storage.

All of these would have different levels of bandwidth supplied per month and system resources (1 CPU/1 GPU/4gb/500gb vs 8 CPU/16GPU/16gb/1.5tb)

Lots of businesses today use these dumb terminals to save money. All this technology is, is a "faster" remote desktop that is almost instantaneous. I can't see any recent high end android device not being compatible. I would assume that the Tegra 4 will be their focus and slowly working in the older generations... eventually opening up to others.
10th January 2013, 09:10 PM   |  #25  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by player911

Eventually all PC's will be "nodes" with bare basic hardware to just get you online. All your apps and games will be streamed like this. Basically it will solve the need to constantly upgrade your PC every year. Just like these little $49 Android PC's that can remote desktop into a server desktop and work from there. These Servers are privatized on huge mainframes and power is allocated per need.

You know, I never thought of the PC gaming evolutioning into something like this, but it's pretty obvious that this is gonna be the way to go.

And the consoles will just be co-exsiting how they are now
11th January 2013, 04:39 AM   |  #26  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fatal1ty_18_RUS

You know, I never thought of the PC gaming evolutioning into something like this, but it's pretty obvious that this is gonna be the way to go.

And the consoles will just be co-exsiting how they are now

I think consoles will go away too. Why buy a beefy piece of hardware for hundreds when you can buy a $49 TV stick and do this remote gaming?

Developers love this because there is no physical medium. No second hand sales. No manufacturing costs. No piracy. Just licenses. $50 a month gets you all you can eat gaming with any game in their library.

Sent from my Nexus 7 using XDA Premium HD app
11th January 2013, 12:41 PM   |  #27  
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Which makes it 600$ a year from one user.. Hmm

I'm not really sure whether the consoles will fade away or not, since for streaming services you either need a console like OnLive offered or get your PC up and running every time you want to use the servuce. So either way you end up with a console lol
11th January 2013, 02:02 PM   |  #28  
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With several devices becoming "smart" (TV, fridges, ovens etc...), the opportunity to change the market with this technology is at hand IMHO. Don't forget that today we still have "software exclusives" for specified platforms, that constrain the users to purchase a specific hardware.
This would simply override the problem (p.e. I decide to buy a specific console A, but a game that I would really like to play is on the console B; I purchase a service to stream it on my device (paying it as A SERVICE, not as A PRODUCT)).

To me, the developers could also benefit by the streaming services developing programs just for one "hardware" and gaining incomes thanks to a "subscription plan" instead of royalties "per sold" copy (dependent on the console, the availability of a distributor, etc).

Paying as a service would also grant a benefit for users on games that have a ridiculous longevity, with an option to "rent" it for a limited time and, if the interest fades quickly, you surely spent less than buying a physical copy of the same game.

On the other hand, while it would completely kill the piracy, it would also kill the market of used products (that is again a plus for the gaming industry but not for the user).
11th January 2013, 11:43 PM   |  #29  
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When will this be available?

If I helped out, hit the thanks button.
12th January 2013, 12:47 AM   |  #30  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SimoxTav

With several devices becoming "smart" (TV, fridges, ovens etc...), the opportunity to change the market with this technology is at hand IMHO. Don't forget that today we still have "software exclusives" for specified platforms, that constrain the users to purchase a specific hardware.
This would simply override the problem (p.e. I decide to buy a specific console A, but a game that I would really like to play is on the console B; I purchase a service to stream it on my device (paying it as A SERVICE, not as A PRODUCT)).

To me, the developers could also benefit by the streaming services developing programs just for one "hardware" and gaining incomes thanks to a "subscription plan" instead of royalties "per sold" copy (dependent on the console, the availability of a distributor, etc).

Paying as a service would also grant a benefit for users on games that have a ridiculous longevity, with an option to "rent" it for a limited time and, if the interest fades quickly, you surely spent less than buying a physical copy of the same game.

On the other hand, while it would completely kill the piracy, it would also kill the market of used products (that is again a plus for the gaming industry but not for the user).

I see your point
But the phrase "opportunity to change the market" (in my understanding) means that thr whole industry will turn into streaming-based only
So let me explain why it's not gonna happen

I think that streaming service can only and ONLY be applied to the PC gaming segment

If such a thing is applied to the console segment - imagine how much money can developers actually earn by spreading their games in streaming service online shops (let's call them like this for now)?

Today it costs millions of dollars to develop a game, especially when you do it for several platforms, which means that you gotta spend money and resources to develop and test the game on each announced platform

So, even with a streaming service, which means a single platform, the money go to the service holder, who pays some % of the income to the devs

The downside of it is that when a player pays 50$ a month (which includes unlimited access to the games library) - the devs literally get nothing from that

Today the Gaikai service (and Nvidia Grid) exist only because devs can afford to spread their games in these service, since they gain profit from the sales on other platforms

So I see several main downsides of the situation when streaming services take over the industry:

1. It creates a single platform, which means that the user has no choice, just a straight-on "subscribe and play scheme"
2. A single platform on the market means that there will be no competition, except for maybe the service holders, but it will just tend to lower the prices and maybe increase perfomances
3. Main rule of ANY market is there's GOTTA be competition. No competition = no progress = high chance of a fatigueness
4. Changing the market into streaming-based will only create chaos and it literally means an end to exclusives and such, no uniqueness
5. Since today most companies release their games on several platforms - it means that the devs can cover most of the money they spent on actually developing the game, and that means BIG money since the platforms have big audiences (and they only tend to increase more and more) which literally equals to 60$ per a game X number of platforms X number of units sold (mostly the numbers are more or less equal)
And 6. Since the devs wouldn't get much $$$ from spreading their games in a single streaming service - it would only lead to creation of several services from each of the big companies
I bet that today's Steam vs Origin example would be the best. We don't want or need that to happen with each gaming company, right?

Wow, sorry for the long post

P.S. Sorry for possible typos - typed this on my N7 lol

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