FORUMS
Remove All Ads from XDA
Honor 7x
Win an Honor 7X!

[2017.10.01] suhide-lite v1.09 [EXPERIMENTAL/UNSUPPORTED]

11,218 posts
Thanks Meter: 86,200
 
By Chainfire, Senior Moderator / Senior Recognized Developer - Where is my shirt? on 9th August 2017, 10:34 AM
View First Unread Post Reply Email Thread
suhide-lite is an experimental (and officially unsupported) mod for SuperSU that can selectively hide root (the su binary) from other applications. It can also toggle visibility of packages (such as SuperSU).

SafetyNet verified passing on 2017.08.10.

This is ultimately a losing game (see the next post). suhide may stop working at any time.

Requirements
- SuperSU v2.82 SR2 or newer (link)
- SuperSU installed in SBIN mode (default on O+)
- Android 6.0 or newer
- TWRP (3.0.2 or newer with access to /data), FlashFire is not (yet) supported.

Xposed
Not supported.

CyanogenMod/LineageOS
Not currently tested or supported. Might work, might not.

Custom kernels/ROMs
If they changed build props, they will probably fail SafetyNet check (for now).

Installation

First make sure you are using SuperSU in SBIN mode on Android 6.x and 7.x
- Boot into TWRP
--- adb shell: echo "BINDSBIN=true">/data/.supersu
--- OR: flash SuperSU Config and select Systemless SBIN mode
- Reflash SuperSU v2.82 SR2 or newer
- Reboot into Android at least once

With SuperSU in SBIN mode
- Flash the suhide ZIP in TWRP
- Reboot into Android

If your TWRP does not fully decrypt /data, reflashing the SuperSU ZIP and immediately flashing the suhide ZIP without rebooting in between may sometimes allow suhide to be installed as well where it would otherwise throw an error.

Usage

The suhide GUI available from your app drawer should be fairly self-explanatory. The About tab lists further instructions.

Advanced usage

You can manually add/remove/list entries to suhide's blacklist by using these commands:

/sbin/supersu/suhide/add UID-or-processname
/sbin/supersu/suhide/rm UID-or-processname
/sbin/supersu/suhide/list

App package names are usually the same as the process name, but not always. Using the UID is safer. You can find the UID by running 'ps -n' (6.x/7.x) or 'ps -An' (8.x). The UID is the first column, and is a 5-digit number starting with 10: 10xxx.

Uninstall

Remove /data/adb/su/suhide folder in TWRP's file manager. You can uninstall the suhide app through Android's settings.

Download

UPDATE-suhide-v1.09-20171001222116.zip

In case that bootloops, try the old v1.00 version, and let me know your device and firmware:
UPDATE-suhide-v1.00-20170809130405.zip

Sauce @ https://github.com/Chainfire/suhide-lite
The Following 142 Users Say Thank You to Chainfire For This Useful Post: [ View ]
 
 
9th August 2017, 10:34 AM |#2  
Chainfire's Avatar
OP Senior Moderator / Senior Recognized Developer - Where is my shirt?
Thanks Meter: 86,200
 
Donate to Me
More
Hiding root: a losing game - rant du jour
Quoting myself from the OP of the old suhide thread:

Quote:
Originally Posted by Chainfire

Most apps that detect root fall into the payment, banking/investing, corporate security, or (anit cheating) gaming category.

While a lot of apps have their custom root detection routines, with the introduction of SafetyNet the situation for power users has become worse, as developers of those apps can now use a single API to check if the device is not obviously compromised.

SafetyNet is of course developed by Google, which means they can do some tricks that others may not be able to easily do, as they have better platform access and control. In its current incarnation, ultimately the detection routines still run as an unprivileged user and do not yet use information from expected-to-be-secure components such as the bootloader or TPM. In other words, even though they have slightly more access than a 3rd party app, they still have less access than a root app does.

Following from this is that as long as there is someone who is willing to put in the time and effort - and this can become very complex and time consuming very quickly - and SafetyNet keeps their detection routines in the same class, there will in theory always be a way to beat these detections.

While reading that may initially make some of you rejoice, this is in truth a bad thing. As an Android security engineer in Google's employ has stated, they need to "make sure that Android Pay is running on a device that has a well documented set of API’s and a well understood security model".

The problem is that with a rooted device, it is ultimately not possible to guarantee said security model with the current class of SafetyNet tamper detection routines. The cat and mouse game currently being played out - SafetyNet detecting root, someone bypassing it, SafetyNet detecting it again, repeat - only serves to emphasize this point. The more we push this, the more obvious this becomes to all players involved, and the quicker SafetyNet (and similar solutions) will grow beyond their current limitations.

Ultimately, information will be provided and verified by bootloaders/TrustZone/SecureBoot/TIMA/TEE/TPM etc. (Samsung is already doing this with their KNOX/TIMA solutions). Parts of the device we cannot easily reach or patch, and thus there will come a time when these detection bypasses may no longer viable. This will happen regardless of our efforts, as you can be sure malware authors are working on this as well. What we power-users do may well influence the time-frame, however. If a bypass attains critical mass, it will be patched quickly.

More security requires more locking down. Ultimately these security features are about money - unbelievably large amounts of money. This while our precious unlocked bootloaders and root solutions are more of a developer and enthusiast thing. While we're all generally fond of shaking our fists at the likes of Google, Samsung, HTC, etc, it should be noted that there are people in all these companies actively lobbying to keep unlocked/unlockable devices available for us to play with, with the only limitation being that some financial/corporate stuff may not work if we play too hard.

It would be much easier (and safer from their perspective) for all these parties to simply plug that hole and fully lock down the platform (beyond 3rd party apps using only the normal APIs). Bypassing root checks en masse is nothing less than poking the bear.

Nevertheless, users want to hide their roots (so do malware authors...) and at least this implementation of suhide is a simple one. I still think it's a bad idea to do it. Then again, I think it's a bad idea to do anything financial related on Android smartphone that isn't completely clean, but that's just me.

Note that I have intentionally left out any debate on whether SafetyNet/AndroidPay/etc need to be this perfectly secure (most people do their banking on virus ridden Windows installations after all), who should get to decide which risk is worth taking, or even if Google and cohorts would be able to design the systems more robustly so the main app processor would not need to be trusted at all. (the latter could be done for Android Pay, but wouldn't necessarily solve anything for Random Banking App). While those are very interesting discussion points, ultimately it is Google who decides how they want this system to work, regardless of our opinions on the matter - and they want to secure it.

I still stand behind this statement I made a year ago.

I will add to this another concern that I've posted before: on the A/B layout devices such as the Google Pixel (XL), it is possible to detect the device is rooted with a handful of lines of code, and I do not see any way to beat this detection aside from custom kernels. As soon as this detection is added to SafetyNet, it is pretty much game over. Frankly I'm surprised it hasn't been added yet.
The Following 47 Users Say Thank You to Chainfire For This Useful Post: [ View ]
9th August 2017, 10:34 AM |#3  
Chainfire's Avatar
OP Senior Moderator / Senior Recognized Developer - Where is my shirt?
Thanks Meter: 86,200
 
Donate to Me
More
The new suhide-lite vs the old suhide
The old suhide was completely different under the hood. It proxied zygote and created two different process trees for the real zygote and descendants (apps), one with root and one without, and multiplexed app instantiation calls between them. The new suhide-lite uses a completely different mechanism to achieve a similar outcome (some apps with and some apps without root).

One thing the old suhide had and the new suhide-lite version does not, is full binder interception. It could listen to and change most API calls and responses between apps and the Android system dynamically. While this may not sound like a big deal to some, from a malware-perspective this is almost a holy-grail class hack. suhide only used it to hide application packages (such as SuperSU) from apps selectively, so for example the launcher could still find it, but to some games it was completely invisible.

The binder interception code was the part that really interested me and the desire to get that working was the driving force behind the old suhide implementation. The security measures in Android's November 2016 security update blocked the old mechanism and with it the binder interceptor. Of course, I have actually written the code to bypass those (naive) protections in turn, but since that implementation of suhide was possible to detect in other ways, I kept that patch private. It may still prove useful in other projects, so it didn't make any sense to burn those work-arounds.

It may be possible to port the interceptor to the new mechanism, but it would be a lot of work and I don't think I'll be doing it any time soon, if ever. The lack of this intercepter is what makes the new suhide lite. The new suhide is able to hide packages such as SuperSU from other apps and games, but it does so via a toggle mechanism (3x alternating volup/voldown) that hides and unhides them, rather than handling the whole thing transparently.
The Following 43 Users Say Thank You to Chainfire For This Useful Post: [ View ]
9th August 2017, 10:35 AM |#4  
Chainfire's Avatar
OP Senior Moderator / Senior Recognized Developer - Where is my shirt?
Thanks Meter: 86,200
 
Donate to Me
More
Changelogs
2017.10.01 - v1.09
- Remove ODM and OEM mounts
- Setpropex: set multiple properties
- Cleanup: remove /boot

2017.08.15 - v1.08
- Fix a process freeze issue
- Fix framework restart survival (stop && start)
- Fix double free crash

2017.08.11 - v1.07
- Startup: Fix parallelism

2017.08.10 - v1.06
- Startup: Disable parallelism (temporary?), causes things to break sometimes

2017.08.10 - v1.05
- GUI: Synchronize changing items with the same UID
- GUI: Hide system apps (UID < 10000)
- GUI: Fix UID / package display line to ellipsize instead of wrap
- Properties: Adjust various build, adb, debug and security properties
- Startup: Improve performance by running operations in parallel
- ZIP: Allow flashing directly after SuperSU switch from image to SBIN mode, without reboot in between

2017.08.09 - v1.00
- Initial release of new code
- For old code, see https://forum.xda-developers.com/app...uhide-t3450396
The Following 34 Users Say Thank You to Chainfire For This Useful Post: [ View ]
9th August 2017, 01:43 PM |#5  
Senior Member
Thanks Meter: 494
 
More
FIRST! new suhide yay. My 6p is currently running N 7.1.2. STOCK ANDROID, NO customisation whatsoever. Will 2.82 SR2 automatically update the root to sbin mode? If yes is the echo command still needed then?

Sent from my Nexus 6P with Tapatalk
9th August 2017, 01:50 PM |#6  
shoey63's Avatar
Recognized Contributor
Flag Somewhere in Oz...
Thanks Meter: 3,416
 
More
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ch3vr0n

FIRST! new suhide yay. My 6p is currently running N 7.1.2. will 2.82 SR2 automatically update the root to sbin mode? If yes is the echo command still needed then?

Sent from my Nexus 6P with Tapatalk

Sbin mode is only activated by default on O (as per OP). Everything else requires the echo command.
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to shoey63 For This Useful Post: [ View ] Gift shoey63 Ad-Free
9th August 2017, 03:03 PM |#7  
Senior Member
Flag New Delhi
Thanks Meter: 254
 
More
Cool. I was avoiding using Magisk so far and was without root to be able to use certain apps like Netflix. I have a Pixel XL. Will SuperSU 2.82 SR2 alongwith suhide-lite work on my phone? Will I have to give the commands in TWRP as given in op? I intend to flash August security patch and try this during that update process. Currently I am stock (no root) with ElementalX kernel which I intend to continue using to be able to hide bootloader unlocked status.
9th August 2017, 03:25 PM |#8  
junioramboy's Avatar
Senior Member
Thanks Meter: 102
 
More
Wow.. this works!

Shamusent
The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to junioramboy For This Useful Post: [ View ] Gift junioramboy Ad-Free
9th August 2017, 04:14 PM |#9  
Senior Member
Thanks Meter: 107
 
More
@Chainfire
hi,
maybe you can do something about this

i'm on nougat 7.1.2 (July security patch) been trying for long time to get this to work on citrix secure hub (by zenprise- formally known as worx)
attaching my logs and pics.
this is what i found from the logs attached:
Code:
"com.citrix.work.MAM.PolicyCheck:Found an APK requiring rooted device: eu.chainfire.supersu"
"com.citrix.work.MAM.PolicyCheck:BuildTag Test advisory ----- > is probably rooted"
SuperUser APKs Test advisory ---- > is probably rooted
the only one thing it didnt find:
Code:
D/"SecureHub"(16939): su In Path Test --- > is NOT rooted
i manged to pass safety net as you can see.
please if you can help.
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	Screenshot_20170809-164953.png
Views:	2282
Size:	196.4 KB
ID:	4236831   Click image for larger version

Name:	Screenshot_20170809-165808.jpg
Views:	2280
Size:	193.6 KB
ID:	4236832  
Attached Files
File Type: log logcat.log - [Click for QR Code] (44.8 KB, 80 views)
9th August 2017, 04:15 PM |#10  
TR2N's Avatar
Senior Member
Flag Hamburg
Thanks Meter: 88
 
More
Hi all and Chainfire. Thank you for this app! I tested it with a search if the Netflix app in the Playstore, but it wasn't found. I hided Playstore app in the list. Is there something I have overseen?

Otherwise I am also passing Safety Net. Thank you Chainfire!
The Following User Says Thank You to TR2N For This Useful Post: [ View ] Gift TR2N Ad-Free
9th August 2017, 04:46 PM |#11  
Chainfire's Avatar
OP Senior Moderator / Senior Recognized Developer - Where is my shirt?
Thanks Meter: 86,200
 
Donate to Me
More
Quote:
Originally Posted by rocky78

@Chainfire
hi,
maybe you can do something about this

i'm on nougat 7.1.2 (July security patch) been trying for long time to get this to work on citrix secure hub (by zenprise- formally known as worx)
attaching my logs and pics.
this is what i found from the logs attached:

Code:
"com.citrix.work.MAM.PolicyCheck:Found an APK requiring rooted device: eu.chainfire.supersu"
"com.citrix.work.MAM.PolicyCheck:BuildTag Test advisory ----- > is probably rooted"
SuperUser APKs Test advisory ---- > is probably rooted
the only one thing it didnt find:
Code:
D/"SecureHub"(16939): su In Path Test --- > is NOT rooted
i manged to pass safety net as you can see.
please if you can help.

Does citrix secure hub run constantly in the background, or do you just need it now and then ?

Have you read the instructions in the About screen as stated ?

Have you tried hiding the SuperSU GUI ? (3x volup/voldown alternate) Because that is what it's detecting.

It's not detecting the su binary, I assume you already hid root from the hub ?

Quote:
Originally Posted by TR2N

Hi all and Chainfire. Thank you for this app! I tested it with a search if the Netflix app in the Playstore, but it wasn't found. I hided Playstore app in the list. Is there something I have overseen?

Otherwise I am also passing Safety Net. Thank you Chainfire!

Try clear Google Play Store and Google Play Services app data.

Netflix shows for me on a freshly installed device.
Post Reply Subscribe to Thread

Guest Quick Reply (no urls or BBcode)
Message:
Previous Thread Next Thread