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SuperSU and SafetyNet / Android Pay

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By Chainfire, Senior Moderator / Senior Recognized Developer - Where is my shirt? on 5th September 2014, 01:23 PM
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1st November 2015, 01:05 PM |#21  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JsChiSurf

Just ran it and it passed.

thanks for that JsChiSurf, I expected it'd pass. Be sure to keep checking it from time to time, google will probably update the safetynet system to 'detect' this at some point.
 
 
2nd November 2015, 05:46 PM |#22  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by osm0sis

I think I found a bug with the systemless installer: if you have SuperSU Pro installed it ends up pushing the SuperSU 2.56 APK over top of it, which confuses a few things in /data/app/ until you uninstall/delete both, reinstall Pro from the Play Store and then sideload the extracted 2.56 APK.

Also, since I've been installing and uninstalling SuperSU so frequently to test things on Lollipop and Marshmallow, I made a little zip to help with uninstalling the old system-modifying version (Lollipop+). It properly restores all the original files the SuperSU installer backed up (so, OTA friendly!) and removes any files added by the installer/app. I figured other people might find it handy as well so it's attached below. Be aware, if you flashed SuperSU twice mistakenly, the SuperSU installer wasn't written to recognize that and so you've lost your originals; a system.img flash WILL be necessary in your case.

This should allow people to switch between the system-modifying and systemless versions more easily/readily, and hopefully improve people's ability to test, so I didn't see the harm in automating this portion. If @Chainfire disagrees then I'll remove it, of course.

Note, to completely remove all traces of the systemless version, all you need to do is uninstall SuperSU, delete /data/su.img and flash a different boot.img, which is pretty cool and easy so I felt no need to add support for that. Also, if you want TWRP to shut up about the system not being rooted, create /system/etc/.installed_su_daemon with a filemanager or with the command "touch /system/etc/.installed_su_daemon" from a root prompt. This doesn't appear to trip up SafetyNet at the moment either, so nothing to worry about but less nag until TWRP gets updated. Happy testing!

Thanks for the update

On the same topic:
when I boot in recovery with TWRP as first screen it tells me it found an untouched system partition and asks me for keeping it read only or allowing modifications to avoid stock rom replaces recovery

what's the right answer here?
2nd November 2015, 11:27 PM |#23  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by osm0sis

Depends. If you're using a device which launched with Lollipop or later (ie. has system.dat patch OTAs) you probably want to keep /system RO so that you can still flash OTAs (provided your root apps also don't alter /system). If you have a device that didn't launch with Lollipop or later (ie. has file patch OTAs) it doesn't matter, your choice; OTAs will flash fine as long as you don't modify the files it tries to patch.

I'm on Nexus 6
My concerns were related to the SafetyNet check, I was worried about breaking it if I would have allowed TWRP to modify system partition.
Anyway I tried and it still passes the check, so it seem TWRP doesn't really modify something, it's just a warning message.

It seems TWRP asks for modifying the recovery script that flash stock recovery back on reboot but since it's not present in Google factory images (I tested that rebooting the device after flashing TWRP without entering in it and TWRP was still there on next reboots), it doesn't do nothing at all.
4th November 2015, 06:45 PM |#24  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Captain_Throwback

For devices that use dm-verity, TWRP leaves system untouched and allows a stock "system image" backup to be performed that will pass the verity check. This image can be restored by the user if an OTA needs to be taken.

Quote:
Originally Posted by shoey63

Just a thought on the "systemless root " method. What do users do when they achieve root? They immediately modify
/system anyway with adaway, exposed, or change build.prop or whatever.
Also, TWRP doesn't make a clean backup of /system either. It splits it, thus breaking dm-verity verification upon restore.

Additionally, with systemless root, even if restoring from TWRP were problematic, it's just as easy to flash a stock system image anyway, as opposed to a TWRP restore.

I'm rooted using the "systemless" option and have not modified /system in anyway, while still gaining the benefits of Titaniumbackup, root browser, root in shell / terminal emulator, running tasker root commands, etc. Haven't touched build.prop or host files in any way (and never do).

Now, when / if xposed comes along for Marshmallow, now I've got a decision to make. Until then, for the time being at least, I have root and the benefits I need as a result, an untouched /system, and Android Pay working.
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13th November 2015, 05:20 AM |#25  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrRobinson

It works fine. Go to the AdAway thread for details.

Hmm actually I seem to pass Google SafetyNet CTS test with standard Adaway host file modification. I'll test if Android Pay works.

If I wanted to remove systemless root though, would I just uninstall SuperSU or are there other files that I need to delete on my phone? If I "Disable Ad Blocking" does that revert my host file to default and my system partition will be stock?
13th November 2015, 09:26 AM |#26  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cares

Hmm actually I seem to pass Google SafetyNet CTS test with standard Adaway host file modification. I'll test if Android Pay works.

If I wanted to remove systemless root though, would I just uninstall SuperSU or are there other files that I need to delete on my phone? If I "Disable Ad Blocking" does that revert my host file to default and my system partition will be stock?

Run the uninstaller, this will only remove the apk. Then flash a stock boot image and then flash v2.52
14th November 2015, 10:05 AM |#27  
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Yeeeah! Success!
So, after unsuccessfully trying to obtain unlock + root & still be able to use Android Pay, I finally saw success thanks to this guide! Awesome!!! I'm so happy about that! However, I also had to overcome what several others have experecienced as well which was the Google Services crashes immediately following boot up the 1st time around.

Thanks to the additional suggestions to upgrade/re-flash a the newer K boot.img I finally saw success & the crashes are a thing of the past & I just confirmed from Root Checker that I am officially rooted!

However, now that I'm officially rooted, I now am itching to try out a new, almost stock with enhancements Marshmellow rom which only seems to currently support the older 08 build.

Regardless, thank you Chain-Fire for showing all of us that this exploit is the real deal!

You deserve all of the props that you and your team are getting. for such a reliable and quick way to get unlocked, rooted, & with Android Pay still available! Cheers
14th November 2015, 04:31 PM |#28  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by drewski_1

AFAIK, 2.56 is just for systemless root and you need a modified kernel / boot.img

2.52 is for the "normal" root process, but may also need kernel mods for marshmallow.

Isn't cm13 prerooted?

Sent from my AOSP on Manta using Tapatalk

A little confused. I am on a preerooted Shamu custom rom, with the Google MRA58R November security update Cataclysm with EX 3.06 Kernel.

Yesterday I unrooted my Nexus 6 using SuperSu with the unroot function and successfully used Android Pay

I reerooted by flashing SuperSu 2.56 and upgrading to Pro (my usual setup). Everything working. Root checker says I have root and I am granting root permissions as before.

So, do I have Systemless root? If not, what do I have? Thanks.


Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
14th November 2015, 04:47 PM |#29  
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Since there's a disclaimer about possible issues with encrypted devices I wanted to join the other users who have reported success.

I've had a bootloader unlocked Nexus 5 which was fully stock and encrypted. By flashing the systemless boot image and the SuperSU 2.56 I was able to achieve root (with Android Pay still working) on MRA58N.
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14th November 2015, 04:56 PM |#30  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stangri

Since there's a disclaimer about possible issues with encrypted devices I wanted to join the other users who have reported success.

I've had a bootloader unlocked Nexus 5 which was fully stock and encrypted. By flashing the systemless boot image and the SuperSU 2.56 I was able to achieve root (with Android Pay still working) on MRA58N.

Which systemless boot image?

Quote:
Originally Posted by GROGG88

There is a systemless image posted by someone as well.

I have seen one but few posts below someone reported it didn't work. It also wasn't by an esteemed and experienced recognized contributor like yourself
15th November 2015, 05:52 PM |#31  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by efrant

To be honest, I don't really see any big advantages on Nexus devices because they have full stock images available, and it is trivial to return to stock.

In order to use the advantages of system-less root, you can't make modifications to /system. For example, if you install busybox, you need to install it in /su/bin not /system/bin. There can be no changes to /system.

Sent from my Nexus 5 using Tapatalk

One big advantage is the ability to use Android Pay without unrooting your Nexus device!

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
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