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Aukey USB PD with PPS

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By Machine_Head, Member on 14th September 2019, 12:53 AM
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14th September 2019, 01:28 AM |#2  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Machine_Head

Will this charger charge our device st 45w?

http://www.gadgetexplained.com/2018/...s-usb.html?m=1

I got one and it seems to work. Usually original would show about 60 minutes to completely charge where this one charges in 44 minutes.

This is at 48%.

When started I've had phone to 20% and has charged up to 60% within 20 minutes or so. So it seems to be but don't know how to exactly check or likely don't have the tools to see if it is going at 45w or less.

But this has worked for me quite well. As rather have multiple when traveling.

Sent from my SM-N975U1 using Tapatalk
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14th September 2019, 04:15 AM |#3  
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The variable voltage and current via the Power Delivery port of the AUKEY charging station means voltage and current varies according to the device between 5V 3A, 9V 3A, 12V 3A, 15V 3A and 20V 3A.

No it won't deliver 45w to the Note 10+
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14th September 2019, 04:22 AM |#4  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaPoets

The variable voltage and current via the Power Delivery port of the AUKEY charging station means voltage and current varies according to the device between 5V 3A, 9V 3A, 12V 3A, 15V 3A and 20V 3A.

No it won't deliver 45w to the Note 10+

Good to know thanks. It is still quicker than most chargers I've gotten. So I'm good with it as it is more than enough for what I'll likely use and charge. But with this info it will then all depend on others. I'll likely later check the 45w official to see if it is really much if a difference but this works better for me and gives good battery for the charge time than I'm used to.


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14th September 2019, 05:14 AM |#5  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DaPoets

The variable voltage and current via the Power Delivery port of the AUKEY charging station means voltage and current varies according to the device between 5V 3A, 9V 3A, 12V 3A, 15V 3A and 20V 3A.

No it won't deliver 45w to the Note 10+


The above statement isn't entirely accurate.

In basic DC electrical circuits the following formula applies:

P = V x I where:

P = Power of the circuit
V = Voltage applied to the circuit
I = Amount of current flowing in the circuit

Following this formula, this power supply can deliver 45 w at the 15 volt and 20 volt levels.

More importantly though is the fact that this power supply is of PPS variant. Meaning that it can listen to and adjust the voltage and current to the device it is charging, provided a specific cable is also used. (I will provide a link below).

So how does this new charging standard for cell phones work?

When the phone is first connected, it checks that the cable and power are capable of PPS type charging. If they aren't, it will charge the older way of just accepting a constant voltage to charge.

If it is the proper "faster" charging PPS type, then it looks at the current battery charge level and then "instructs" the power supply to provide a certain voltage level. The closer the current battery charge is to 0, the higher the voltage it will tell the power supply to deliver. So, if the battery is near 0, it will ask up to 20 volts from the power supply. So, at 20 volts and at a maximum of 3 Amps, that is how this power supply can provide 60 watts. (See above formula). Our phone can only accept 2.25 Amps at 20 volts, hence 45 Watt charging.

So, the closer the battery level was closer to 0, the fast this charger will charge..... for a time.

Once the battery gets closer to a full charge or the battery temperature is too high. Yes they monitor battery temp, this came out of the Note 7 debacle. It will tell the power supply to reduce the voltage, hence reducing the power (wattage) level to the battery and slowing the charging rate. This typically happens between 70-80% of full charge.

Sorry if this was sooo long.

This is the US version of the above power supply.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07HJWMYH5..._-BgFDbP18G9WV

This is the required cable to go with it.

Anker Powerline II USB C to USB C 2.0 Cable (6ft) USB-IF Certified, Power Delivery PD Charging Cable
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B071WNXY1R..._5DgFDb6V78HJY


Remember all of this just happens when connected to the USB-C port of the charger. The other ports do not support the new charging standard.
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14th September 2019, 02:25 PM |#6  
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Yes itโ€™s too long of a post for this type of forum. We all get it you have some knowledge in electrical theory and its quite notable.

Still, @DaPoets post is accurate in this case because samsung have certain requirements to get a charge to output exactly that unique charging state the phones circuitry will accept. This is used by handshaking betwixt the Emarker chips on the cable and the battery controller in the phone.

Although the charger in question maybe able to output the current as its listed on the charger itself, there still needs to be certain protocols in place that only samsung know to make a charger output that unique voltage.

Of course in time 3rd party chargers will eventually appear but its highly unlikely any 3rd party charger at this point can output that exact spec.
14th September 2019, 07:47 PM |#7  
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This whole Samsung charger tech has everyone confused and like the following article states they want to sell you there Branded chargers. That's fine, but these style chargers need to be paired with a specific "IF- certified" cable, which has chips in both ends and aids in the handshaking between phone and charger.

So, based on this article, a power supply that utilizes the PD 3.0 standard with PPS ability should fit the bill. Therefore the power supply that the original poster asked about DOES fit that bill, provided it is paired with the correct cable.

https://www.extremetech.com/mobile/2...or-the-note-10
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14th September 2019, 09:26 PM |#8  
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Here is a good Reddit thread on the subject.

https://www.reddit.com/r/galaxynote10/comments/cws50p/

---------- Post added at 09:26 PM ---------- Previous post was at 09:15 PM ----------

One more post and I'll let this go.

Here is a review of an Aukey third party 45w charger. He got the same results as the OEM 45w charger.

So, to out this to bed, there are chargers available, but you really have to pay attention to the charging specs.
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14th September 2019, 11:59 PM |#9  
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USB-IF are e marker cables. same thing I said.

there is no hype in what the sammy 45 W can do. there are 3rd party chargers that can output many watts/amperage of power, but if they don't have the right handshake that the sammy battery controller is looking for, the phone wont do 45W at the unique voltage the note 10 is looking for.
16th September 2019, 03:17 AM |#10  
Machine_Head's Avatar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lmanlo

I got one and it seems to work. Usually original would show about 60 minutes to completely charge where this one charges in 44 minutes.

This is at 48%.

When started I've had phone to 20% and has charged up to 60% within 20 minutes or so. So it seems to be but don't know how to exactly check or likely don't have the tools to see if it is going at 45w or less.

But this has worked for me quite well. As rather have multiple when traveling.

What cable did you use?
16th September 2019, 03:19 AM |#11  
Machine_Head's Avatar
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ronjr123

The above statement isn't entirely accurate.

In basic DC electrical circuits the following formula applies:

P = V x I where:

P = Power of the circuit
V = Voltage applied to the circuit
I = Amount of current flowing in the circuit

Following this formula, this power supply can deliver 45 w at the 15 volt and 20 volt levels.

More importantly though is the fact that this power supply is of PPS variant. Meaning that it can listen to and adjust the voltage and current to the device it is charging, provided a specific cable is also used. (I will provide a link below).

So how does this new charging standard for cell phones work?

When the phone is first connected, it checks that the cable and power are capable of PPS type charging. If they aren't, it will charge the older way of just accepting a constant voltage to charge.

If it is the proper "faster" charging PPS type, then it looks at the current battery charge level and then "instructs" the power supply to provide a certain voltage level. The closer the current battery charge is to 0, the higher the voltage it will tell the power supply to deliver. So, if the battery is near 0, it will ask up to 20 volts from the power supply. So, at 20 volts and at a maximum of 3 Amps, that is how this power supply can provide 60 watts. (See above formula). Our phone can only accept 2.25 Amps at 20 volts, hence 45 Watt charging.

So, the closer the battery level was closer to 0, the fast this charger will charge..... for a time.

Once the battery gets closer to a full charge or the battery temperature is too high. Yes they monitor battery temp, this came out of the Note 7 debacle. It will tell the power supply to reduce the voltage, hence reducing the power (wattage) level to the battery and slowing the charging rate. This typically happens between 70-80% of full charge.

Sorry if this was sooo long.

This is the US version of the above power supply.
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07HJWMYH5..._-BgFDbP18G9WV

This is the required cable to go with it.

Anker Powerline II USB C to USB C 2.0 Cable (6ft) USB-IF Certified, Power Delivery PD Charging Cable
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B071WNXY1R..._5DgFDb6V78HJY


Remember all of this just happens when connected to the USB-C port of the charger. The other ports do not support the new charging standard.


A very good read. Thank you for you and everybody else's input.

Any cable that are e-marked should work, right?

Will get this charger just to satisfy my curiosity. ๐Ÿ˜Š
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