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Un-rootable thanks to manufacturer. What is it exactly?

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By RealRobD, Junior Member on 10th August 2019, 07:18 PM
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What does the manufacturer do to the phone to make it un-rootable?

This quote: "Strictly speaking, when we talk about a platform as open as the Android OS, it is almost impossible for a manufacturer to make an ‘un-rootable’ device."
would suggest that most likely the manufacturer is not making the phone un-rootable. So then that would leave the OS, but my 4.2.2 KitKat has and is rooted on other devices.
So who and what is at fault here? Seems to me that if it was software, that would be easy. Find an exploit and root. But if it was that easy then all phones/devices would be rootable.
That brings us back to hardware and the manufacturer.
 
 
10th August 2019, 09:06 PM |#2  
Quote:
Originally Posted by RealRobD

What does the manufacturer do to the phone to make it un-rootable?



This quote: "Strictly speaking, when we talk about a platform as open as the Android OS, it is almost impossible for a manufacturer to make an ‘un-rootable’ device."

would suggest that most likely the manufacturer is not making the phone un-rootable. So then that would leave the OS, but my 4.2.2 KitKat has and is rooted on other devices.

So who and what is at fault here? Seems to me that if it was software, that would be easy. Find an exploit and root. But if it was that easy then all phones/devices would be rootable.

That brings us back to hardware and the manufacturer.

It is more a matter of the carriers trying their hardest to prevent us from being able to unlock/root the devices they offer and less a matter of the manufacturer trying to prevent it.. They do this for several reasons. But the main reasons are to prevent security breaches, to protect the information on their customer's devices, to prevent having to repair/replace devices that have been broken due to failed rooting/flashing/modifying attempts and to prevent us from using their devices on another carrier's network.

It is considered to be impossible to make devices that absolutely can't be rooted. They are all vulnerable in some manner, these vulnerabilities are called exploits, it's just a matter of finding the right exploit. When exploits are found, the manufacturer or carrier will patch the exploit and release an update for their devices to apply the patch.

The main thing they do to make devices unrootable is to use a locked bootloader, some even use specific hardware components to prevent unapproved software from booting.

It's a combination of things really, there is not necessarily one certain thing they do to keep us from rooting, because there are many different ways to unlock/root devices, they try their best to account for them all.


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10th August 2019, 11:42 PM |#3  
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Quote:

It is considered to be impossible to make devices that absolutely can't be rooted. They are all vulnerable in some manner, these vulnerabilities are called exploits, it's just a matter of finding the right exploit.

Can you direct me to the recommended newbie reading to get my learn on?
My Alcatel onetouch has stumped current one click methods, so it's time to learn and crack this puppy on my own.
11th August 2019, 02:18 AM |#4  
Quote:
Originally Posted by RealRobD

Can you direct me to the recommended newbie reading to get my learn on?

My Alcatel onetouch has stumped current one click methods, so it's time to learn and crack this puppy on my own.

If all one click methods have failed, the only option left is to flash some kind of customized software or methods to modify parts of your boot and/or system partitions. Flashing custom software and modifying boot or system requires the device to have an unlocked bootloader.

This means that your first step is to determine whether or not your device has an unlocked bootloader. If it is unlocked, you can flash/modify the device, if it is locked, you can't flash/modify unless you find a method to unlock the bootloader, then you can flash/modify. Do some searches for methods to check your bootloader status.

If you find that the bootloader is unlocked, then you have a few choices:

1) if you can obtain a copy of your stock firmware then you can use the Magisk rooting method to modify the boot.img from your firmware to create a patched boot.img then flash that boot.img using the appropriate flash tool for your device brand.

2) if you can find a copy of TWRP custom recovery for your specific device model number you can flash the TWRP file using the appropriate flash tool for your device brand.

3) if there is no TWRP for your specific model number, you can build your own version of TWRP if the necessary resources are available for your specific model number.

4) if the necessary resources to build TWRP for your specific model number are not available, you can try finding a TWRP for a similar device with the same exact CPU that your device has and port that TWRP to be compatible with your own device.

Do your own searching and researching about each of these options, the more you read about them, the more you will understand.

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12th August 2019, 05:44 PM |#5  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Droidriven

If all one click methods have failed, the only option left is to flash some kind of customized software or methods to modify parts of your boot and/or system partitions. Flashing custom software and modifying boot or system requires the device to have an unlocked bootloader.

This means that your first step is to determine whether or not your device has an unlocked bootloader. If it is unlocked, you can flash/modify the device, if it is locked, you can't flash/modify unless you find a method to unlock the bootloader, then you can flash/modify. Do some searches for methods to check your bootloader status.

If you find that the bootloader is unlocked, then you have a few choices:

1) if you can obtain a copy of your stock firmware then you can use the Magisk rooting method to modify the boot.img from your firmware to create a patched boot.img then flash that boot.img using the appropriate flash tool for your device brand.

2) if you can find a copy of TWRP custom recovery for your specific device model number you can flash the TWRP file using the appropriate flash tool for your device brand.

3) if there is no TWRP for your specific model number, you can build your own version of TWRP if the necessary resources are available for your specific model number.

4) if the necessary resources to build TWRP for your specific model number are not available, you can try finding a TWRP for a similar device with the same exact CPU that your device has and port that TWRP to be compatible with your own device.

Do your own searching and researching about each of these options, the more you read about them, the more you will understand.

Sent from my SM-S767VL using Tapatalk

Can't get past "Waiting on devices" when using
Code:
fastboot oem device-info
.

Device manager shows the phone is connected just fine.
The phone has no manual way to set fast boot, whether it be the buttons or entering numbers on the keypad.

Device recognized.

Code:
fastboot devices
returns nothing. I guess that means it's not in fast boot mode.

Code:
adb reboot bootloader
and
Code:
adb reboot fastboot
only reboots the phone.

On the other hand,
Code:
adb reboot recovery
does work.
12th August 2019, 10:49 PM |#6  
Quote:
Originally Posted by RealRobD

Can't get past "Waiting on devices" when using

Code:
fastboot oem device-info
.



Device manager shows the phone is connected just fine.

The phone has no manual way to set fast boot, whether it be the buttons or entering numbers on the keypad.



Device recognized.



Code:
fastboot devices
returns nothing. I guess that means it's not in fast boot mode.



Code:
adb reboot bootloader
and
Code:
adb reboot fastboot
only reboots the phone.



On the other hand,
Code:
adb reboot recovery
does work.

Your device probably doesn't even have fastboot mode, some carriers remove fastboot from their devices, especially MVNO(subcontracted) networks.



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13th August 2019, 03:36 AM |#7  
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Yep, looks like no Fastboot onboard...
13th August 2019, 06:04 PM |#8  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by galaxys

Yep, looks like no Fastboot onboard...

If it's just software, why can't it be bypassed, cracked, hacked, blown up etc?
14th August 2019, 06:41 AM |#9  
Quote:
Originally Posted by RealRobD

If it's just software, why can't it be bypassed, cracked, hacked, blown up etc?

If you're asking about what was said about not having fastboot, it is a lack of software, as in, the software is not even there.

If you're asking if the software can be bypassed, it can, the trick is to find the right exploit. That is the problem, a working exploit has not been discovered for this device.

Without fastboot, there is no way to flash custom files such as TWRP or patched boot.img. This means, the only chance of rooting the device is if one of the one-click universal rooting apps or universal PC rooting programs has an exploit that just happens to network on this device.

Sent from my SM-S767VL using Tapatalk
14th August 2019, 02:15 PM |#10  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Droidriven

If you're asking about what was said about not having fastboot, it is a lack of software, as in, the software is not even there.

If you're asking if the software can be bypassed, it can, the trick is to find the right exploit. That is the problem, a working exploit has not been discovered for this device.

Without fastboot, there is no way to flash custom files such as TWRP or patched boot.img. This means, the only chance of rooting the device is if one of the one-click universal rooting apps or universal PC rooting programs has an exploit that just happens to network on this device.

Sent from my SM-S767VL using Tapatalk

Have any fastboot-less phones in the past been rooted?
If so, do you have any recommended reading as far as exploit hunting is concerned?
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