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Low light

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By XDA_RealLifeReview, RealLifeReview Dude on 16th March 2020, 02:03 PM | Average Rating:
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At the club, at the bar, or just in your mom's basement, nighttime is when you come out to play. Rate this thread to express how the Huawei P40 Pro's camera performs when no or low light is present. A higher rating indicates that the camera sensor "sees" lots of light in dim conditions, and that the resulting photos have minimal noise. A higher rating also indicates that when the flash fires, the resulting photo is evenly-lit without any bright spots.

Then, drop a comment if you have anything to add!
27th April 2020, 11:05 PM |#2  
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Any experience regarding blur when capturing moving objects (pets, kids, people) indoor?
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29th April 2020, 09:32 PM |#3  
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For me p40 pro doing night photos like a beast.
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1st May 2020, 02:08 AM |#4  
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For low light shots, using normal "photo" mode seems better than using night mode. Example in attachments. First shot is night mode, second is photo mode.
I think night mode is better when you have a tripod. Although I havent tried that.


EDIT: After further testing, I think it really depends on the situation. In some situations, night mode will produce better shots. In others, it will produce worse shots than normal photo mode. So, just in case, always take at least two photos. One in photo mode, one in night mode.
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7th May 2020, 11:10 PM |#5  
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Just a small low light comparison with Huawei Mate 20 Pro. Night mode used on both devices. As you can see on the photo taken with the Mate 20 Pro, the text "co engineered with Leica" isn't as clear as on the pic taken with P40 Pro. Huawei keeps improving their night mode, it's actually very impressive. 👍
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8th May 2020, 09:47 AM |#6  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UXELLR

Any experience regarding blur when capturing moving objects (pets, kids, people) indoor?

I do. A lot of pictures failed due do this. I expected a bit more from this phone on this point.
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10th May 2020, 04:13 PM |#7  
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regarding low light, i had a few reviewers taking pictures in pitch darkness, yet the image comes out well. Just a point and shoot. is that in an update or its just fake? cause i have tried it, does not work
20th May 2020, 10:39 AM |#8  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UXELLR

Any experience regarding blur when capturing moving objects (pets, kids, people) indoor?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Michael69300

I do. A lot of pictures failed due do this. I expected a bit more from this phone on this point.

In that case, you need to expect a bit more from the fundamental laws of physics and optics.
Three approaches to low-light photos with a fixed aperture:
1) High ISO and short exposure - grainy pictures. The higher the ISO, the uglier the photo. Same with digital zoom, a real pestilence of modern times and death sentence of just any photo.
2) Low ISO and long exposure - in-motion unsharpness.
3) Multiple pictures taken with different ISO and exposure settings, "stacking".
That's it, eat or die. :/

Same with all digital cameras. There's no workaround to defy the laws of physics.
There's only one approach to taking low-light photos with a short exposure, thus being able to avoid in-motion unsharpness: High ISO, thus grainy pictures.
Taking high quality photos under bad lighting conditions always requires long exposures. And long exposures naturally cannot catch quick motions.

Okay, there's algorithms. But the worse the picture, the more the algorithms need to "guess". And guessing means "not knowing". Thus it's a kind of lottery if your low-light pictures showing moving objects turn out acceptable or bad.
If they're acceptable, be happy.
If they're bad, blame it on physics.
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20th May 2020, 11:11 AM |#9  
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You are right about physics. Still there are difference between cameras/phones regarding blur. Pixel phones generally seem to capture movement better than, say galaxy phones. There has to be an acceptable weighting to faster shutter speeds, even if you end up with some grain. Its easier to fix grain afterwards than a light-trail-resembling face.
20th May 2020, 12:04 PM |#10  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UXELLR

You are right about physics. Still there are difference between cameras/phones regarding blur. Pixel phones generally seem to capture movement better than, say galaxy phones. There has to be an acceptable weighting to faster shutter speeds, even if you end up with some grain. Its easier to fix grain afterwards than a light-trail-resembling face.

You've got four options:
1) Use the Night mode, which will take several pictures with different ISOs and exposures, will then stack the pictures taken to achieve a kind of HDR picture for low-light purposes. Drawback: Not suitable for motion.
2) Use the regular Photo mode, which will try to get a sound balance of ISO and exposure, then use proprietary algorithms for making the best out of the mess taken.
3) Try the Pro mode, which allows you to set ISO, exposure and exposure value compensation ("EV", for brighening/darkening the photo a bit further) with less algorithms wreaking havoc on the picture. That way, you can experiment with the effects of different parameters like ISO and exposure time.
4) Use the Pro mode, but save the picture as a RAW file. It will look horrible without all the manipulations of the software algorithms. - Then grab a good PC tool for "developing" and postprocessing the RAW image. That way, you might be able to achieve better results because you bring in the "human factor", yourself, taking care of the things you prefer, not the software.
If you're heavily into catching quick movements, you need to force your P40 Pro into using short exposure times, then play with the other parameters to achieve a sound balance.

Two great PC tools for picture postprocessing:
1) "Luminar 4" by Skylum - this is your choice if you're new to image processing, don't wish to spend months with learning. That software gives you almost instant success with creating pleasant pictures.
2) "Affinity Photo" by Serif - that's your choice if you are an old-stager of image processing, and/or willing to spend weeks or months with the real steep learning curve of that software. It's the "swiss army knife" of everything out there. Utmost capable, can do just everything. But as said: Takes ages to master.
Both tools are massively supported by YouTube videos and tutorials, there's no evil subscription bondage as with Adobe, just give it a try.
I can almost guarantee you won't regret spending a few bucks - as postprocessing is one of the key factors for creating stunning images.
But I need to repeat: If you're new to this matter, go for Luminar, not for Affinity.
Additional note on that: As Huawei doesn't use the standard Bayer sensor matrix, RYYB instead of the "classic" RGGB, you might need to wait for the developers to implement some special algorithms/camera profiles dealing with that to achive real outstanding results. I did not try, yet, maybe it's okay already.

Each phone and camera and camera software has it's benefits and drawbacks. Some work great in a specific situation, less great in others. Plus, there's the "moment momentum": Exactly the same scene might result in a great or an ugly picture, slightest changes of lighting, field of view (affecting exposure metering and more) or temperature (sensor temperature is a common source of picture noise) might cause a mighty difference. It's just a bit unpredictable, no hardware/software combination is able to deal with each and every challenge, for each benefit you usually pay with a drawback.
Just like with everything in live.
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20th May 2020, 05:24 PM |#11  
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Great post, thanks is given👍Yes, one can achieve good results, even with less expencive mobile camera phones, if you are willing to invest time and work. The lack of HDR in pro mode, for instance is a big handicap when developing pictures yourself. Blown out highligts, as an example, cant be brought back if the data is not there. But again, great tips and workarounds for getting the best out of what you have!
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