FORUMS

Things You Should Know About Lithium Ion Battery

517 posts
Thanks Meter: 1,370
 
By Xenova, Senior Member on 14th July 2011, 03:48 AM
Post Reply Email Thread
3rd October 2012, 06:17 PM |#241  
chrone's Avatar
Senior Member
Flag Surabaya
Thanks Meter: 398
 
More
thanks for sharing this!
4th October 2012, 07:05 AM |#242  
ward360's Avatar
Senior Member
Thanks Meter: 43
 
More
Great info, Nice job putting it out there for everybody.
Here is a link for some real detailed info on Lithium batteries
http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/a..._ion_batteries

Keep in mind the guys that build the charging circuit's for our phone know a whole lot about lithium batteries and design them very carefully. Our phones taper off charge current ( Voltage limiting) as the phone gets near full charge, once full charge is reached they actually shut off the charge circuit until the Voltage drops off a bit, at that point it will resume charging, if you leave it plugged in it will effectively charge to 100% then discharge a bit, once low enough it will resume charging again, and continue this cycle until you unplug it.
All while your phone says it is at 100% charge.

Ever notice that you unplug it sometimes and it starts dropping % very soon, Other time's it takes longer before it starts dropping %? It all depends on where in that cycle you unplug it. The percent you see is a built in calculation on what they think you want to see. How mad would you be if you charged your phone all night and then unplugged it and it instantly said you were at 95%? humm....

This is a great app that works on some devices if you are curious https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...ntwidget&hl=en

Overcharged lithium batteries equals FIRE! That is the last thing phone manufactures want! Well, the I-things have had problems with that... In my industry we call them thermal events. Fire is a bad word.

Once again Great Job!
The Following 4 Users Say Thank You to ward360 For This Useful Post: [ View ] Gift ward360 Ad-Free
4th October 2012, 12:53 PM |#243  
Xenova's Avatar
OP Senior Member
Thanks Meter: 1,370
 
More
Quote:
Originally Posted by ward360

Great info, Nice job putting it out there for everybody.
Here is a link for some real detailed info on Lithium batteries
http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/a..._ion_batteries

Keep in mind the guys that build the charging circuit's for our phone know a whole lot about lithium batteries and design them very carefully. Our phones taper off charge current ( Voltage limiting) as the phone gets near full charge, once full charge is reached they actually shut off the charge circuit until the Voltage drops off a bit, at that point it will resume charging, if you leave it plugged in it will effectively charge to 100% then discharge a bit, once low enough it will resume charging again, and continue this cycle until you unplug it.
All while your phone says it is at 100% charge.

Ever notice that you unplug it sometimes and it starts dropping % very soon, Other time's it takes longer before it starts dropping %? It all depends on where in that cycle you unplug it. The percent you see is a built in calculation on what they think you want to see. How mad would you be if you charged your phone all night and then unplugged it and it instantly said you were at 95%? humm....

This is a great app that works on some devices if you are curious https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...ntwidget&hl=en

Overcharged lithium batteries equals FIRE! That is the last thing phone manufactures want! Well, the I-things have had problems with that... In my industry we call them thermal events. Fire is a bad word.

Once again Great Job!

Thanks for the head up. Learnt from your post.

Sent from my HTC Desire HD using Tapatalk 2
4th October 2012, 02:50 PM |#244  
chrone's Avatar
Senior Member
Flag Surabaya
Thanks Meter: 398
 
More
Quote:
Originally Posted by ward360

Great info, Nice job putting it out there for everybody.
Here is a link for some real detailed info on Lithium batteries
http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/a..._ion_batteries

Keep in mind the guys that build the charging circuit's for our phone know a whole lot about lithium batteries and design them very carefully. Our phones taper off charge current ( Voltage limiting) as the phone gets near full charge, once full charge is reached they actually shut off the charge circuit until the Voltage drops off a bit, at that point it will resume charging, if you leave it plugged in it will effectively charge to 100% then discharge a bit, once low enough it will resume charging again, and continue this cycle until you unplug it.
All while your phone says it is at 100% charge.

Ever notice that you unplug it sometimes and it starts dropping % very soon, Other time's it takes longer before it starts dropping %? It all depends on where in that cycle you unplug it. The percent you see is a built in calculation on what they think you want to see. How mad would you be if you charged your phone all night and then unplugged it and it instantly said you were at 95%? humm....

This is a great app that works on some devices if you are curious https://play.google.com/store/apps/d...ntwidget&hl=en

Overcharged lithium batteries equals FIRE! That is the last thing phone manufactures want! Well, the I-things have had problems with that... In my industry we call them thermal events. Fire is a bad word.

Once again Great Job!

But how to use the phone from transfering data from pc to phone via usb cable when it's already charged full 100%, is it safe enough to leave it plugged in until the transfer is finish?

And does it prolong the battery life span to charged up to 80% only?

I used to charge the phone when it reaches below 80% whenever it's possible from PC or stock charger (40% to 60% left). Sometimes i forgot to unplug it up to 90%.

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus
4th October 2012, 08:00 PM |#245  
Senior Member
Thanks Meter: 57
 
More
It is fine to leave it in. Lithium battery like to be charged often, and usually when it says it is 100% it isn't. You can never fully charge it because then it will explode, it is the same you cannot discharge it all the way down as it is dangerous.

As long the battery is not overheating the circuit within the phone will manage the charging so it won't impact the battery or the phone.

Sent from my Desire HD using xda app-developers app
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to springy For This Useful Post: [ View ] Gift springy Ad-Free
7th October 2012, 08:06 PM |#246  
chrone's Avatar
Senior Member
Flag Surabaya
Thanks Meter: 398
 
More
Quote:
Originally Posted by springy

It is fine to leave it in. Lithium battery like to be charged often, and usually when it says it is 100% it isn't. You can never fully charge it because then it will explode, it is the same you cannot discharge it all the way down as it is dangerous.

As long the battery is not overheating the circuit within the phone will manage the charging so it won't impact the battery or the phone.

Sent from my Desire HD using xda app-developers app

Relieved to hear this. I sometimes overcharging it at work due to activity and forgot the phone was still plugged into PC. Lol

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus
7th October 2012, 11:16 PM |#247  
'cooleagle''s Avatar
Retired Forum Moderator
Thanks Meter: 1,146
 
More
Hello XDAites,

I request you to stop posting:
- 'Thanks this helped'
- 'Yeah Me too'
- '##Insert one liner here##'
- '##Insert one word here##'

The above type of posts here in the Accessories section and rather start hitting the thanks button.

If I find any such posts I'm going to delete them & you may get banned, you have been warned !

Regards
The Following User Says Thank You to 'cooleagle' For This Useful Post: [ View ] Gift 'cooleagle' Ad-Free
7th February 2013, 01:33 PM |#248  
Senior Member
Thanks Meter: 12
 
More
Question
Quote:
Originally Posted by Xenova

That's why it is important to use original battery + charger because they are designed to stop smartly when the battery is full (my case, it will always stop at 4.199 as 4.2 is full capacity).

Not recommend to use those "universal charger" because the charger won't know what is the max capacity and dunno when to stop charge. That will lead to overcharge.

So, no worry mate. If you charge using proper charger or charge using your phone then everthing is juz fine. You can sleep soundly.

Is there are reason for this? I mean the charger does not "switch off" for most phones, the charger is just a transformer.
I would have thought the key thing to check is the supply voltage of the charger.
The max current gives you some indication of the speed of the charger, but again it is up to your phone to draw that current, so a 5A charger for a phone that comes with a 3A charger should only draw the 3A unless the phone is of poor design. Similarly if your charger only supplies 2.5A, then it will just charger slower.
That is why phones can charger from a 0.5A USB port, or from a wall charger

So in summary, what else other than supply voltage quality and quantity (both Spikes/Noise/Ripple and avg value) should we check on these cheaper chargers?
7th February 2013, 06:20 PM |#249  
android4temo's Avatar
Senior Member
Thanks Meter: 39
 
More
Thumbs up
This is some good stuff! Thanks for this info. I have always had questions about the battery in my phone and how it operates. you just educated me.
The Following User Says Thank You to android4temo For This Useful Post: [ View ] Gift android4temo Ad-Free
25th March 2013, 06:15 AM |#250  
Member
Flag Manila City
Thanks Meter: 41
 
More
very helpful. thanks
The Following User Says Thank You to vaud27 For This Useful Post: [ View ] Gift vaud27 Ad-Free
25th March 2013, 08:29 PM |#251  
Senior Member
Thanks Meter: 8
 
More
Quote:
Originally Posted by icstm

Is there are reason for this? I mean the charger does not "switch off" for most phones, the charger is just a transformer.
I would have thought the key thing to check is the supply voltage of the charger.
The max current gives you some indication of the speed of the charger, but again it is up to your phone to draw that current, so a 5A charger for a phone that comes with a 3A charger should only draw the 3A unless the phone is of poor design. Similarly if your charger only supplies 2.5A, then it will just charger slower.
That is why phones can charger from a 0.5A USB port, or from a wall charger

So in summary, what else other than supply voltage quality and quantity (both Spikes/Noise/Ripple and avg value) should we check on these cheaper chargers?

So in other words, you can use a 2a Nexus 10 charger on a phone that comes with a 1a charger?
Never mind...answered here.
The Following User Says Thank You to starfcker69 For This Useful Post: [ View ] Gift starfcker69 Ad-Free
Post Reply Subscribe to Thread

Tags
battery, general, phone

Guest Quick Reply (no urls or BBcode)
Message:
Previous Thread Next Thread
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes