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[INFO][EU] Rooting and Flashing don't void the warranty

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By Ilko, Senior Member on 17th November 2012, 11:50 PM
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3rd January 2013, 01:30 PM |#31  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by xonar_

"Running any software on the device that we don't approve voids your warrenty." (And I'm pretty sure that will include rooting software)

In most parts of the world such clauses were ruled invalid a long time ago.
The manufacturer has to prove that you did something wrong and that these allegedly wrong actions actually bricked the device.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bäcker

The OP ist not entirely correct.

You can only claim the compulsory warranty from the seller you bought the phone at.

You are wrong. That's only true for a certain amount of time after which the manufacturer is held responsible.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bäcker

The manufacturer on the other hand still has the right to make up rules when warranty applies and when it does not.

Bullsh*t!

Quote:
Originally Posted by Bäcker

Your contract is not with the manufacturer but with your seller.

You are wrong again, see above.
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26th January 2013, 11:08 PM |#32  
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good to know i still have warranty, thks
26th February 2013, 07:26 AM |#33  
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Samsung refused to fix mine. They called it BER. Beyond Economical Repair due to me modifying it.

Luckily the latest update fixed my freezing issues though so my phone is now working great.
2nd April 2013, 07:48 PM |#34  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by chuayx1

To be safe, I flashed and rooted it after my warranty expired.

It'll take time for LG to honour the warranty worldwide.

Two years later? In two years you may will have other phone like S4 or Nexus 5 etc...
12th April 2013, 11:09 AM |#35  
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Regarding this directive, I thought, as I already spent the time googling this stuff, this complementary documentation might come in handy :

Directive full texts in EU languages :

http://eur-lex.europa.eu/Result.do?c...=1&Submit22=GO (bottom list)

Directive :

http://eur-lex.europa.eu/Notice.do?v...pgs=10&hwords=

Reference to national law implementations :

http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/...99L0044:EN:NOT

As I read a few posts back someone stating the national law overrides EU directives, that is more or less accurate, in fact, directives have to be implemented into national law (member states have no choice and will be drawn to EU court if they don't), and until they are implemented, the old national law will indeed continue apply.

On the other hand this directive is 14 years old, so all member states should have implemented it in the meantime.

The last link being the most interesting as you can see in what texts this has been implemented to in the respective member states.

Using those texts, you should have more power to compell the reseller to fulfill his duties.

Just thought I would share...

JP.
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4th June 2013, 04:24 PM |#36  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by re4lsk

As i said, it all depends on the region, here in my country, LG is forced to give at least 1 year warranty. Seller in this case the carrier is just the intermediary.

sent from my Optimus Black V28c

this is about the EU....

and here in Ireland, your contract us definitely with the seller.

Manufacturers warranty is additional to your statutory rights.

Sent from my GT-I9300 using xda app-developers app
15th June 2013, 01:18 PM |#37  
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Not quite true.

The UK hasn't fully signed up to this clause, although some retailers have still accepted it when informed.

The UK rules provide for a refund/repair up to 5 years after purchase, but there is a caveat.
Up to 6 months it is up to the retailer to PROVE that it is the fault of the consumer in order to refuse the return.
After 6 months it is up to the CONSUMER to prove that the fault was inherent in the device when they purchased it.

This burden of proof shift invariably means that returning goods older than 6 months is problematic unless it is a commonly acknowledged defect in the device (i.e. multiple consumers are affected).
15th June 2013, 01:46 PM |#38  
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Well this says the law has been in act for over a decade in the UK :

http://eur-lex.europa.eu/LexUriServ/...N:NOT#FIELD_UK

Quote:

The Sale and Supply of Goods to Consumers Regulations 2002 SI n° 3045 du 10/12/2002, Coming into force: 31/03/2003.

Legal act: Administative measures; Official Journal: Her Majesty's Stationery Office (HMSO), Publication date: 10/12/2002; Reference: (SG(2003)A/00873)

JP.

Sent from my SlimBean 6 / Yank555.lu CM10.1 kernel v1.6c-beta2 (Linux 3.0.81) powered Galaxy S3 i9300
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18th August 2013, 07:35 PM |#39  
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Thank you for the info! It was useful to me!
2nd October 2013, 01:30 PM |#40  
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8th October 2013, 11:31 AM |#41  
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Anyone know if there is any info about this stuff with relation to Australia?

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