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New dirty and sneaky invasion of privacy in new Facebook and Wechat updates

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By desiregeek, Senior Member on 23rd April 2013, 10:33 AM
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26th April 2013, 07:06 AM |#21  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by immortalneo

No, the reason they don't want u to uninstall is because they want to include on the package "Comes pre-loaded with Facebook and Wechat". Its sort of like a marketing strategy.

Some apps were not allowed to be uninstalled in the past also. However, disabling them is an option that they have given to stop such apps.

I suggest you stop worrying about these permissions and learn to move on mate.

Attachment 1909866

"To err is human, to forgive is divine"
Sent from my SGS II

http://bgr.com/2013/04/25/online-pir...adults-465164/
 
 
26th April 2013, 10:26 AM |#22  
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More from Engadget on what I had said before about this. Thanks to Engadget for reporting on this. Wechat and Facebook are pretty dirty and sneaky when it comes to stuff like this. I would not be surprised to see Whatsapp and Line Naver in on this as well.

http://www.engadget.com/2013/04/26/g...ge-play-store/
26th April 2013, 02:44 PM |#23  
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People already told it, but you seem to not understand it.

Your internal RAM is split in several partitions (system, data, cache, ...), one of them, the System, contains the Android OS and system apps, like telephone, google maps, browser, gallery, ... and pre-installed bloatware depending on your operator and the manufacturer, like Facebook, WeChat, shopping apps, ...
You and apps don't have write access to this system partition. So you're unable to change system files, but also are unable to remove apps from the system partition.
If you update one of those system apps, the update won't be installed on the system partition but on the data partition to which you have write permission. Thus you also can only remove the updates later.
If you don't like one app placed on the system partition, then you can freeze/deactivate it. It won't run any longer, and won't gather any user informations, it's impossible! It's just as if you removed it (except that the apk file is still on the system partition, but it's useless)
The alternative is to gain root access, then you can write to the system partition and remove the apk.

But because you have difficulties to understand the very basics of Android you should avoid rooting because you will understand this process and the consequences even less.

Your link about 'Study shows major generational divide on online privacy attitudes' has nothing to do with this thread or Android at all. It's about the beahviour of people using the internet and sharing their personal informations in general.
The link on engadget, again, has nothing to do with this thread. It's about updating an app outside the play store which got installed via the Play Store. Thus, in the past, you could upload a safe app to the play store and auto-update to a malicious app later. Now this won't be allowed any longer. It's probably also not directed directly against Facebook, because, as far as I read, did Facebook use this feature to offer beta versions to interested users and not to circumvent the Play Store. But again, this article has absolutely nothing to do with the problem you have described in this thread.
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26th April 2013, 02:57 PM |#24  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UpSpin

People already told it, but you seem to not understand it.

Your internal RAM is split in several partitions (system, data, cache, ...), one of them, the System, contains the Android OS and system apps, like telephone, google maps, browser, gallery, ... and pre-installed bloatware depending on your operator and the manufacturer, like Facebook, WeChat, shopping apps, ...
You and apps don't have write access to this system partition. So you're unable to change system files, but also are unable to remove apps from the system partition.
If you update one of those system apps, the update won't be installed on the system partition but on the data partition to which you have write permission. Thus you also can only remove the updates later.
If you don't like one app placed on the system partition, then you can freeze/deactivate it. It won't run any longer, and won't gather any user informations, it's impossible! It's just as if you removed it (except that the apk file is still on the system partition, but it's useless)
The alternative is to gain root access, then you can write to the system partition and remove the apk.


But because you have difficulties to understand the very basics of Android you should avoid rooting because you will understand this process and the consequences even less.

Your link about 'Study shows major generational divide on online privacy attitudes' has nothing to do with this thread or Android at all. It's about the beahviour of people using the internet and sharing their personal informations in general.
The link on engadget, again, has nothing to do with this thread. It's about updating an app outside the play store which got installed via the Play Store. Thus, in the past, you could upload a safe app to the play store and auto-update to a malicious app later. Now this won't be allowed any longer. It's probably also not directed directly against Facebook, because, as far as I read, did Facebook use this feature to offer beta versions to interested users and not to circumvent the Play Store. But again, this article has absolutely nothing to do with the problem you have described in this thread.


Are you saying that if one does an update that because it was updated it can no longer be uninstalled? In the past this was possible, no?
26th April 2013, 03:09 PM |#25  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desiregeek

Are you saying that if one does an update that because it was updated it can no longer be uninstalled? In the past this was possible, no?

Nope.. you cannot uninstall that app even if u update it or not..its a system app..

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26th April 2013, 03:25 PM |#26  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by desiregeek

Are you saying that if one does an update that because it was updated it can no longer be uninstalled? In the past this was possible, no?

No, I was saying that the app was pre-installed on your smartphone by the manufacturer. It was there from the beginnig on and you weren't able to remove it from the beginning on. It's on the system partition, just as the gallery app or google maps etc. is. Or do you complain that you can't remove google maps from your smartphone?

But this doesn't mean that you might own or have owned Android smartphones which didn't came pre-installed with WeChat etc., there you had to install it manually, thus you can fully remove it again, too.

It's also possible that it came bundled to the ROM with an OS upgrade. So the intitial OS hadn't it pre-installed, (thus you were able to remove it) but with the latest update the smartphone manufacturer bundled it with the ROM and thus it's on the system partition (and you can't remove it any longer).

But you always can disable the app. It's the same as removing it, it won't work any longer, you won't see it any longer in the app launcher. It also does not consume some space because the free space on the system partition isn't accessible for you at all.
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29th April 2013, 05:30 PM |#27  
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Looks like Samsung read my mind on this one..

http://www.samsung.com/global/busine...ung-knox#con02
29th April 2013, 07:23 PM |#28  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by UpSpin

People already told it, but you seem to not understand it.

Your internal RAM is split in several partitions (system, data, cache, ...), one of them, the System, contains the Android OS and system apps, like telephone, google maps, browser, gallery, ... and pre-installed bloatware depending on your operator and the manufacturer, like Facebook, WeChat, shopping apps, ...
You and apps don't have write access to this system partition. So you're unable to change system files, but also are unable to remove apps from the system partition.
If you update one of those system apps, the update won't be installed on the system partition but on the data partition to which you have write permission. Thus you also can only remove the updates later.
If you don't like one app placed on the system partition, then you can freeze/deactivate it. It won't run any longer, and won't gather any user informations, it's impossible! It's just as if you removed it (except that the apk file is still on the system partition, but it's useless)
The alternative is to gain root access, then you can write to the system partition and remove the apk.

But because you have difficulties to understand the very basics of Android you should avoid rooting because you will understand this process and the consequences even less.

Your link about 'Study shows major generational divide on online privacy attitudes' has nothing to do with this thread or Android at all. It's about the beahviour of people using the internet and sharing their personal informations in general.
The link on engadget, again, has nothing to do with this thread. It's about updating an app outside the play store which got installed via the Play Store. Thus, in the past, you could upload a safe app to the play store and auto-update to a malicious app later. Now this won't be allowed any longer. It's probably also not directed directly against Facebook, because, as far as I read, did Facebook use this feature to offer beta versions to interested users and not to circumvent the Play Store. But again, this article has absolutely nothing to do with the problem you have described in this thread.

The correct term is ROM. RAM is the memory used to RUN apps and the OS. ROM is the space used to STORE them.
30th April 2013, 02:01 AM |#29  
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Originally Posted by Product F(RED)

The correct term is ROM. RAM is the memory used to RUN apps and the OS. ROM is the space used to STORE them.

What would be nice is if the smartphones came with two flash drives which were encrypted that prevents accessing one another via downloaded applications to where as Samsung demonstrated an example in the link below only Samsung did this on the same ROM.

http://www.gottabemobile.com/2013/04...efore-you-buy/

http://www.samsung.com/global/busine...ung-knox#con02
14th May 2013, 06:53 PM |#30  
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Facebook is like a cancer..

http://bgr.com/2013/05/13/htc-first-...acebook-phone/
5th July 2013, 07:15 AM |#31  
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Facebook,whatsapp and many out there are a real problem these days. Invasion of privacy and the whole 9 yards. Governments should crack down on them but I doubt it as they work together often.

http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/technology-23187771


What would be very nice to see is if manufacturers would manufacture a smartphone with two flash drives in them of which are separate and basically runs like Parallels on a Macbook. Flash A can not access flash B and Flash B can not access Flash A. They would need to be heavily and securely encrypted. One could have call logs,emails,sms messages,pictures and contacts on Flash A and downloaded applications go on to Flash B. Then they can have access to anything that they want on Flash B of which has nothing on there but other applications They could also look at contacts of which there are none accept of ones of which you choose to add manually. If they can make a smartphone run with 2 sim cards and Samsung can make a smartphone run with Windows and Google OS (coming up) then they make one like I had said.


http://www.computerworld.com/s/artic...oid_Jelly_Bean
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