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"AN-21 U" - Unbranded 6.2" 2 DIN Pure Android 4.1 Car Stereo Radio Head Unit [ROOTED]

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By KID52, Senior Member on 15th November 2013, 05:16 PM
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16th November 2013, 03:24 AM |#11  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KID52

Best to keep discussion for the 4.1 unit in this thread now.

My keyboard is not Bluetooth, it has a small receiver that is probably 2.4GHz, and it works fine.

Unfortunately there is no Bluetooth menu on the device. However, there are a few interesting quirks with the unit, one being that the security menu is disabled, however, if you try to enable something (I forget what, maybe storing location data or something), it tells you that a lock code must be set, so you press okay, and what opens? The security menu...

I will try installing Torque at some point, as on my phone it requests to turn on Bluetooth, so maybe it will access the menu on the unit. I don't have much hope for this working though.

Perhaps the USB device will work, but I do not have one, and do not intend on buying one at that price.



Yes, I've tried a couple that I had lying around.

If you can recommend a specific one that isn't too expensive I may trying buying to see if it works.

KEEP IN MIND ALL MY EXPERIENCE IS WITH THE 2.3 OUKU but this might help:

Usb Keyboard is natively supported on all of them, if it's wireless with its own dongle (not bluetooth) that's just all it is, a usb keyboard.

For the bluetooth menu install Quick Bluetooth Lite from Market. I was lucky enough one of the dongles I had lying around worked (one didn't) mine sais "KINIVO" on it.

There is a similar app on the market to use bluetooth keyboards.

...but with both of the above it all depends on the ability to add a BT dongle, the internal one is not visible to android as I understand it (and as it was with the other units OUKU, winCE etc.

I have that exact ODBII reader mainly because I wanted a reliable one that could get the most codes... off topic here, but there is differences. Torque forums are a good resource. I haven't tried USB with it yet. There is cheap usb only out there, but I guess there is two different kinds of usb-to-serial chips... you MIGHT have one of the two installed if they included it....

Bottom line, it doesn't matter what Android supports. What matters is what modules the chinese manufacturer compiled in the kernel or included as a loadable module...

You could get a hint looking at the /home/rick/OUKU/stock/4.1/test/lib/modules/ folder...
16th November 2013, 03:36 AM |#12  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by sciallo

KEEP IN MIND ALL MY EXPERIENCE IS WITH THE 2.3 OUKU but this might help:

Usb Keyboard is natively supported on all of them, if it's wireless with its own dongle (not bluetooth) that's just all it is, a usb keyboard.

Yes, exactly my thoughts.

Quote:
Originally Posted by sciallo

For the bluetooth menu install Quick Bluetooth Lite from Market. I was lucky enough one of the dongles I had lying around worked (one didn't) mine sais "KINIVO" on it.

There is a similar app on the market to use bluetooth keyboards.

Thank you for the advice, I will try it out soon, see what happens.

The info you have regarding the OUKU unit may well be relevant to this new one too.
16th November 2013, 03:49 AM |#13  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KID52


Perhaps the USB device will work, but I do not have one, and do not intend on buying one at that price.

No, you don't have to buy such devices just for testing purposes. I have plans on buying one for my Santa Fe i45, because USB OBD2 scanners are faster and way more reliable that BT ones, and I'll need it to plug directly into my laptop or the OTG adapter in my SGS4.


Quote:
Originally Posted by KID52

Yes, I've tried a couple that I had lying around.

If you can recommend a specific one that isn't too expensive I may trying buying to see if it works.

Try to plug them when your stereo is turned off. I recall someone saying that you have to plug in WiFi and 3G dongles with the headunit turned off, so they get detected by Android when it boots up. Perhaps this is the case with BT dongles too.
16th November 2013, 04:04 AM |#14  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orisai

Try to plug them when your stereo is turned off. I recall someone saying that you have to plug in WiFi and 3G dongles with the headunit turned off, so they get detected by Android when it boots up. Perhaps this is the case with BT dongles too.

Hmm, I said that. I put it in the main post too. Maybe someone said it about OUKU too, I don't know.

But yes, I do usually turn off the stereo and plug the device in before booting.
16th November 2013, 04:34 AM |#15  
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Then it must be like sciallo said, kernel has to be compiled with the required modules to make bluetooth dongles work, much like Hal9k's firmware.
16th November 2013, 05:26 AM |#16  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KID52

Yes, I've tried a couple that I had lying around.

If you can recommend a specific one that isn't too expensive I may trying buying to see if it works.

Might want to get a terminal for android, like Android Terminal Emulator. Then you can check to see what sort of linux modules/drivers are pre-installed. For example:

Code:
$ lsmod
lsmod
blackberry 1084 0 - Live 0xbf10a000
cdc_acm 15311 0 - Live 0xbf100000
sierra 9201 0 - Live 0xbf0f7000
option 13120 0 - Live 0xbf0ea000
usb_wwan 8010 1 option, Live 0xbf0e2000
hso 29290 0 - Live 0xbf0d3000
tnx_mxt_ts 15886 0 - Live 0xbf0c9000
cp210x 10931 2 - Live 0xbf0c0000
pl2303 10925 0 - Live 0xbf0b7000
usbserial 26415 8 blackberry,sierra,option,usb_wwan,cp210x,pl2303, Live 0xbf0a8000
88w8688_wlan 362475 1 - Live 0xbf041000
tun 13189 2 - Live 0xbf037000
omap3_isp 97716 0 - Live 0xbf014000
omap_hsmmc 14041 0 - Live 0xbf000000
$
This will give you an example of modules installed. In the above example is from the Parrot Asteroid Smart. The output gives you an idea of the sort of devices that you'll be able to use with the unit. For example, there are the cp210x and pl2303 drivers for Serial UART to USB devices. So, for example one could use a USB ODB2 cable as long as they use either a Prolific or Silcon Labs UART.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KID52

I will try installing Torque at some point, as on my phone it requests to turn on Bluetooth, so maybe it will access the menu on the unit. I don't have much hope for this working though.

Perhaps the USB device will work, but I do not have one, and do not intend on buying one at that price.

Something that is not well known is that Torque Pro supports USB ODB2 cables. The product linked earlier from Amazon is an ODB2 scanner by Scantool which is a professional model. (Analagous to buying a Fluke Multimeter vs an Innova) They do have another model that costs a little bit more and supports USB and Bluetooth or even WiFi if you prefer. But, there are some less expensive knock offs that you can get for less a fraction of the price. So, if you know the AN-21 U supports a particular Serial to USB driver then you might be able to use one with Torque Pro. The nice thing about USB ODB2 cables over Bluetooth ones is that the data stream is closer to real time and has less lag than a BT ODB2 adapter around the same price.

Quote:
Originally Posted by KID52

Unfortunately there is no Bluetooth menu on the device. However, there are a few interesting quirks with the unit, one being that the security menu is disabled, however, if you try to enable something (I forget what, maybe storing location data or something), it tells you that a lock code must be set, so you press okay, and what opens? The security menu...

Some places hide various menus from the settings control panel, but you can often them bring them up using intents through Activity Manager. However, finding the available intents sometimes requires root but you do not need to be root to execute them. For example:

Code:
$ su
su
# dumpsys package com.android.settings | grep BluetoothSettings
dumpsys package com.android.settings | grep BluetoothSettings
        4068b7e0 com.android.settings/.bluetooth.BluetoothSettings filter 4068bc48
        4068b7e0 com.android.settings/.bluetooth.BluetoothSettings filter 4068ba78
        4068b7e0 com.android.settings/.bluetooth.BluetoothSettings filter 4068ba78
# exit
exit
$ am start -n com.android.settings/.bluetooth.BluetoothSettings
am start -n com.android.settings/.bluetooth.BluetoothSettings
Starting: Intent { cmp=com.android.settings/.bluetooth.BluetoothSettings }
$
However, not all Bluetooth software conforms to the Android standards and will force close if it doesn't. In most cases if a Bluetooth driver is installed then a good app to get is Bluetooth Auto-Pair. It allows the manual settings to pair various devices even if the manufacturer implements an artificial limitation on the devices that they will support.
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16th November 2013, 05:32 AM |#17  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by donaldta

Snip.

You definitely seem to know your stuff!

That is an extremely informative post, thank you.

I'll take another read tomorrow and do some tests on the unit, see what I can find out.
16th November 2013, 06:06 AM |#18  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Orisai

Android doesn't have NTFS support,

This is actually a pretty bad blanket statement. It actually depends on the Linux modules included with the Android device. And in fact, I played with an Android TV device that had fuse.ko modules installed and supported NTFS partitions. The best way to tell what sort of filesystem that your Android device supports is through "/proc/filesystems".
Code:
$ cat /proc/filesystems
cat /proc/filesystems
nodev   sysfs
nodev   rootfs
nodev   bdev
nodev   proc
nodev   cgroup
nodev   tmpfs
nodev   sockfs
nodev   usbfs
nodev   pipefs
nodev   anon_inodefs
nodev   devpts
        cramfs
        squashfs
nodev   ramfs
        vfat
        msdos
nodev   mqueue
nodev   mtd_inodefs
nodev   oprofilefs
nodev   ubifs
$
The first column signifies whether or not the filesystem is currently present on your android device and the second column shows all the various types that it supports.

---------- Post added at 11:06 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:49 PM ----------

Quote:
Originally Posted by KID52

I'll take another read tomorrow and do some tests on the unit, see what I can find out.

While you're at it, you might consider installing SRT AppScanner. If the device is vulnerable to Master Key either exploit bug 8219321 and/or 9695860 then there's a good chance that Cydia Impactor can root your device.
16th November 2013, 06:17 AM |#19  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by donaldta

While you're at it, you might consider installing SRT AppScanner. If the device is vulnerable to Master Key either exploit bug 8219321 and/or 9695860 then there's a good chance that Cydia Impactor can root your device.

I thought you needed to connect your device to a PC to use Cydia Impactor? Also, not sure if it would be required, but USB debugging is password protected.
16th November 2013, 07:18 AM |#20  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KID52

I thought you needed to connect your device to a PC to use Cydia Impactor? Also, not sure if it would be required, but USB debugging is password protected.

Well, technically you don't have too. It works off of Android Debug Bridge and can work over WiFi or USB. However, it does need debugging to be enabled. I missed the part that it is password protected. However, the masterkey scripts might still be able to help gain access to root if it hasn't been patched on the device.
16th November 2013, 10:54 AM |#21  
Quote:
Originally Posted by sciallo

If we think about it, Android isn't even part of the equation reading those files really, just a bootloader or the unit's firmware.

That was my thought. I'm downloading one of the files now to take a look, but it's saying it'll be over an hour
I doubt I have the skills to "crack" it, but I'm very curious about the whole thing. It just seems so strange.


Edit: Might pay to add some notes to the wiki identifying this model and the new thread - if possible, upload a photo aswell (not that I can say anything - I've not done either about my unit on there yet).

Edit2: File finally finished downloading, and I'd had a quick look. Beyond my skills I'd say... I can spot the obvious (MCU is the 65k, main filesystem is the big file) but that's where it ends. Chance of me succeeding at working anything else out is somewhere between 0% and 1%. I'm leaning towards the 0% Encryption isn't really my thing.
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