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[Q&A] Ubuntu on the Transformer (eMMC install)

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By lilstevie, Senior Recognized Developer on 29th July 2011, 06:11 AM
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23rd October 2011, 01:37 AM |#1001  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rdnetto

Oops, my bad. While I've got you, you wouldn't happen to have any ideas about that kernel panic I mentioned earlier, would you?

yeah, it is a change in the way the ramdisk is handled, it is specific to jhintas initrd for some reason
 
 
23rd October 2011, 04:54 AM |#1002  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilstevie

yeah, it is a change in the way the ramdisk is handled, it is specific to jhintas initrd for some reason

OK, so how do I get an initrd that works with your kernel? Is there some script or command I need to run?


Quote:
Originally Posted by mrmrmrmr

thank you.
what is the tool to use for creating a full backup ? (is it nandroid or something else ?)
also, what shall I use for resizing the partition ?

I have :
system.img
data.img
cache.img
on my nandroid backup...

Ok, that should be fine. Run the flash kit, then restore the nandroid backup and you should be fine.

I don't know if you'll need to resize the partition file, since I'm not familiar with how nandroid works. Try it without the resizing and see if it works.
In case you do, here're the instructions:
Use resize2fs then dd to create a copy of the file without the uneeded zeros at the end.
e.g. if you've used resize2fs to reduce it to 4 GB, then 'dd if=original.bin of=smaller.bin bs=1G count=5' (while you probably only really need count=4, I prefer to go a little over in case there's some overhead).
Note that once the file has been restored to the transformer it'll only be 4GB until you use resize2fs under Ubuntu to expand it to fit all available space. This can be avoided by only shrinking it to the new size of the partition instead of the smallest possible size, but increases the amount of time it takes to restore the backup.

(This has to be done under Linux because Windows doesn't understand Linux filesystems).


Quote:
Originally Posted by megacoolrock

i need help with the wpa supplicant, ive tried to do this and i saw a guise for transformer ubuntu, but it was the wrong format, can anyone give me a sudo command or something that will work? the connection i have is a wep

I'd suggest upgrading to WPA since WEP is extremely insecure, but here're some general instructions on wpa_supplicant and here's an example of how to do wep.
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23rd October 2011, 06:28 AM |#1003  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rdnetto

OK, so how do I get an initrd that works with your kernel? Is there some script or command I need to run?




Ok, that should be fine. Run the flash kit, then restore the nandroid backup and you should be fine.

I don't know if you'll need to resize the partition file, since I'm not familiar with how nandroid works. Try it without the resizing and see if it works.
In case you do, here're the instructions:
Use resize2fs then dd to create a copy of the file without the uneeded zeros at the end.
e.g. if you've used resize2fs to reduce it to 4 GB, then 'dd if=original.bin of=smaller.bin bs=1G count=5' (while you probably only really need count=4, I prefer to go a little over in case there's some overhead).
Note that once the file has been restored to the transformer it'll only be 4GB until you use resize2fs under Ubuntu to expand it to fit all available space. This can be avoided by only shrinking it to the new size of the partition instead of the smallest possible size, but increases the amount of time it takes to restore the backup.

(This has to be done under Linux because Windows doesn't understand Linux filesystems).




I'd suggest upgrading to WPA since WEP is extremely insecure, but here're some general instructions on wpa_supplicant and here's an example of how to do wep.


can you post the bootimg that you are having issues with
23rd October 2011, 08:37 AM |#1004  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilstevie

can you post the bootimg that you are having issues with

See attached.
Attached Files
File Type: zip kernel.zip - [Click for QR Code] (3.15 MB, 43 views)
23rd October 2011, 09:52 AM |#1005  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rdnetto

See attached.

if that is a boot.img it is amazing it even goes that far, the bootimg is fubard
23rd October 2011, 10:18 AM |#1006  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rdnetto

Ok, that should be fine. Run the flash kit, then restore the nandroid backup and you should be fine.

I don't know if you'll need to resize the partition file, since I'm not familiar with how nandroid works. Try it without the resizing and see if it works.
In case you do, here're the instructions:
Use resize2fs then dd to create a copy of the file without the uneeded zeros at the end.
e.g. if you've used resize2fs to reduce it to 4 GB, then 'dd if=original.bin of=smaller.bin bs=1G count=5' (while you probably only really need count=4, I prefer to go a little over in case there's some overhead).
Note that once the file has been restored to the transformer it'll only be 4GB until you use resize2fs under Ubuntu to expand it to fit all available space. This can be avoided by only shrinking it to the new size of the partition instead of the smallest possible size, but increases the amount of time it takes to restore the backup.

(This has to be done under Linux because Windows doesn't understand Linux filesystems).

Please excuse me if I'm sounding too novice.
I didn't understand how this works; how will I know which partition file to resize (if it needs to be resized) ?
How can I understand if nandroid needs resizing before I restore ?

Also, I have a few questions before doing that operation and taking the risk of losing my Android ROM:
1. how shall I update Android rom once I have dual boot ? (How to gointo recovery)
2. is there a windows toolkit to use under Windows ? (I only have Linux setup under my VMware environment, would that work with the Linux toolkit ?)
3. Once I have Ubuntu running, shall I be able to upgrade to latest Ubuntu (11.10) ?

Thank you sir...
23rd October 2011, 12:52 PM |#1007  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilstevie

if that is a boot.img it is amazing it even goes that far, the bootimg is fubard

Odd, I just used abootimg with the same commands as in the flashkit. We are talking about the file inside zip, right? I ran it on the netbook, but it shouldn't make that much difference...
I've been using the latest copy of abootimg from the git, so I don't think it's that..


Quote:
Originally Posted by mrmrmrmr

Please excuse me if I'm sounding too novice.
I didn't understand how this works; how will I know which partition file to resize (if it needs to be resized) ?
How can I understand if nandroid needs resizing before I restore ?

Also, I have a few questions before doing that operation and taking the risk of losing my Android ROM:
1. how shall I update Android rom once I have dual boot ? (How to gointo recovery)
2. is there a windows toolkit to use under Windows ? (I only have Linux setup under my VMware environment, would that work with the Linux toolkit ?)
3. Once I have Ubuntu running, shall I be able to upgrade to latest Ubuntu (11.10) ?

Thank you sir...

0. If none of the files are >5GB, just skip the resizing step. If they are, the biggest is the one to resize.
1. Recovery/CWM works the same as always. It's actually used as an (interim) boot manager.
2. There's a Windows flashkit, and you can use the copy of nvflash included to do backups, etc. if you convert the .sh files into .bat ones. (This is only possible for simple scripts like the backup.)
I'd suggest trying to make it work with the Linux one though (either through the virtual machine or with a live CD) since I had no end of problems getting the drivers for nvflash to work under Windows.
3. You can, though I haven't tried it. To be perfectly honest, you're probably better off just installing 11.10 now. To do so, create an image with rootstock and use it as the root filesystem. After that run the driver injection script, get wifi working, then run 'apt-get install ubuntu-desktop'. (alter as required if you prefer a different desktop environment). Keep in mind you'll need to do all that in the terminal, since until you install it there won't be a GUI.
Alternatively you could use the official rootfs for Tegra 2 systems. That would be a lot easier, but AFAIK no-one's tested it with the transformer yet. Since there are some differences between the systems, I don't know how that would turn out.

For reference, here's the command to create a new root filesystem:
Code:
sudo rootstock -f TF101 -l user -p mypassword --seed build-essential,openssh-server,nano,aptitude --imagesize 8G --components main,restricted,multiverse,universe --notarball -m http://ports.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-ports -d oneiric
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23rd October 2011, 01:10 PM |#1008  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rdnetto

Odd, I just used abootimg with the same commands as in the flashkit. We are talking about the file inside zip, right? I ran it on the netbook, but it shouldn't make that much difference...
I've been using the latest copy of abootimg from the git, so I don't think it's that..

yeah that was a mybad, was using the wrong tool, however I can confirm that your initrd is buggered
Code:
[email protected]:~/android_linux$ file initrd.img.gz 
initrd.img.gz: gzip compressed data, from Unix, last modified: Tue Jul 26 14:04:33 2011
[email protected]:~/android_linux$ gunzip initrd.img.gz 

gzip: initrd.img.gz: unexpected end of file
23rd October 2011, 04:56 PM |#1009  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lilstevie

Code:
[email protected]:~/android_linux$ gunzip initrd.img.gz 

gzip: initrd.img.gz: unexpected end of file

Ah, so that's how you test it. My original copy of the initrd had gotten corrupted (not sure how), which explains why none of my attempts were working. Redownloading the flashkit fixed it. Thanks for that.
23rd October 2011, 06:34 PM |#1010  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rdnetto

Odd, I just used abootimg with the same commands as in the flashkit. We are talking about the file inside zip, right? I ran it on the netbook, but it shouldn't make that much difference...
I've been using the latest copy of abootimg from the git, so I don't think it's that..



0. If none of the files are >5GB, just skip the resizing step. If they are, the biggest is the one to resize.
1. Recovery/CWM works the same as always. It's actually used as an (interim) boot manager.
2. There's a Windows flashkit, and you can use the copy of nvflash included to do backups, etc. if you convert the .sh files into .bat ones. (This is only possible for simple scripts like the backup.)
I'd suggest trying to make it work with the Linux one though (either through the virtual machine or with a live CD) since I had no end of problems getting the drivers for nvflash to work under Windows.
3. You can, though I haven't tried it. To be perfectly honest, you're probably better off just installing 11.10 now. To do so, create an image with rootstock and use it as the root filesystem. After that run the driver injection script, get wifi working, then run 'apt-get install ubuntu-desktop'. (alter as required if you prefer a different desktop environment). Keep in mind you'll need to do all that in the terminal, since until you install it there won't be a GUI.
Alternatively you could use the official rootfs for Tegra 2 systems. That would be a lot easier, but AFAIK no-one's tested it with the transformer yet. Since there are some differences between the systems, I don't know how that would turn out.

For reference, here's the command to create a new root filesystem:

Code:
sudo rootstock -f TF101 -l user -p mypassword --seed build-essential,openssh-server,nano,aptitude --imagesize 8G --components main,restricted,multiverse,universe --notarball -m http://ports.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-ports -d oneiric

what is "driver injection script" and where can I find it ?
also where can I find rootstock ?

edit: Ok; I got rootstock. But I still don't know what driver injection script is...

problem with rootstock:

[email protected]:~/tf/rootfs# sudo rootstock -f TF101 -l user -p mypassword --seed build-essential,openssh-server,nano,aptitude --imagesize 8G --components main,restricted,multiverse,universe --notarball -m http://ports.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-ports -d oneiric
I: Running on a i686 machine
Your debootstrap installation does not seem to have support for the oneiric distribution
[email protected]:~/tf/rootfs#
23rd October 2011, 07:14 PM |#1011  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrmrmrmr

what is "driver injection script" and where can I find it ?
also where can I find rootstock ?

edit: Ok; I got rootstock. But I still don't know what driver injection script is...

problem with rootstock:

[email protected]:~/tf/rootfs# sudo rootstock -f TF101 -l user -p mypassword --seed build-essential,openssh-server,nano,aptitude --imagesize 8G --components main,restricted,multiverse,universe --notarball -m http://ports.ubuntu.com/ubuntu-ports -d oneiric
I: Running on a i686 machine
Your debootstrap installation does not seem to have support for the oneiric distribution
[email protected]:~/tf/rootfs#

Driver injection script is in the flashkit.

Are you running rootstock on a 11.10 installation?
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