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My Android Phone is Communicating with the DoD Network Information Center.

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By Tony Boone, Junior Member on 14th January 2014, 09:20 PM
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I have information that I would like you all to examine. However, I cannot post the three images or the IP addresses of the DoD Network Information Center that are in the log files on my phone.

I think this is important and if not then no harm or foul. Is there someone I can send the post to that can look it over in the event there are any questions as to my motives or its legitimacy? I think this information needs to be made public as soon as possible.
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14th January 2014, 10:22 PM |#2  
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Here is the information that I was going to post above. I'd like to know what this means as relates to their being a .mil IP address (22.230.19.19) associated with the Kernal, Android System, and Google Play services of this phone. I note that at the time of this particular event I had the phone in wifi mode only to update a couple of apps. Then I turned the wifi off. Wifi is only used for updates otherwise it's off.

Wondering if this has something to do with the phone or the home network?

So yesterday I installed the 'Android Firewall' from the Google Playstore and just today went through the settings. It has the ability to log accepted and rejected information requests. There are no hacked or cracked programs on my phone. It's straight out of the box with only five or six paid apps and the rest free and available on the Google Play Store website.

I checked all of the IP addresses in the firewall log file and found this one; 22.230.19.19. It's the IP address of the DoD Network Information Center.

Network Contact Information:
22.230.19.19
OrgTechHandle: MIL-HSTMST-ARIN
OrgTechName: Network DoD
OrgTechPhone: +1-800-365-3642
OrgTechEmail: disa.columbus.ns.mbx.hostmaster-dod-nic@mail.mil
OrgTechRef: http://whois.arin.net/rest/poc/MIL-HSTMST-ARIN

Here is a screen shots and other related information. Note the IP address and the arrows pointing to 22.230.19.19. It's not just any program but it appears the actual Android kernal itself, the Android System, and Google Play services all are devised in such a way as to communicate with the DoD Network Information Center. At least in my case.



So I looked up the IP address 22.230.19.19 on this website and this is what was returned. Red diamond (or square) marks the spot of their facility on this map.



Then I did some further investigation with a program I have that returned this information on the IP address 22.230.19.19.



Anyone smarter than me have some information they'd like to share? Since I was on WiFi at the time would it have anything to do with my home network as opposed to the phone and why would a .mil IP address be interacting with the phone's kernal and android system? I can see it with the Google Play Store since Google was created with CIA seed money.
14th January 2014, 10:54 PM |#3  
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interesting. I am curious as well. I am sure someone has came across this in the past. What phone are you using?
14th January 2014, 11:19 PM |#4  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by big gulps huh?

interesting. I am curious as well. I am sure someone has came across this in the past. What phone are you using?

(Thanks to the admin who allowed me the additional privileges necessary to post the images in this thread!)

It's a T-Mobile Alcatel Onetouch Fierce. Three weeks old at most. Only have a couple of free apps on it and no more than five paid apps. Rooted. Factory ROM.

Something strange happened to my T-Mobile Samsung Exhibit II 4g the day before I had to buy this new one. The Exhibit II 4g was working fine and then went into an unrecoverable boot loop. Not just any boot loop but one that wouldn't take or allow me to perform a factory reset. It was as though someone had sent some malicious code to the phone and sent it into a death spiral.

I could take the battery out of it, put it back in, and it would immediately boot up. Normally I'd have to hold the power button on for about three seconds but not then. Nothing I could do but replace the phone and I lost a lot of precious data in the process.

I called the DoD Network Information Center and spoke with a tech who said that they only deal with military IT at that center. He told me they have no association or affiliation with private corporations () and that I needed to contact my cell phone provider. I called T-Mobile and all the woman in their second level tech support wanted to do was do a complete factory reset on my phone. She didn't seem to understand the potential gravity of the situation and why I was calling.

Here are two more screen shots of the firewall log on the T-Mobile Alcatel Onetouch Fierce except that when these images were taken the phone has been in 4g network access mode only. WiFi has been off for about two hours now.

Android Firewall's 'Allowed' communication:



Android Firewall's 'Blocked' communication:

15th January 2014, 04:48 PM |#5  
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I thought for sure that this would get at least a couple of people curious. Why my phone is communicating almost every minute with the U.S. Department of Defense Network Information Center doesn't seem to be of great interest to most here. With the spying revelations going on I'd have thought that someone here must have seen something similar to what I'm seeing on my phone.

I'm not the most knowledgeable when it comes to the Android OS and individual that has a phone like mine apparently isn't getting the same network filtering through the Department of Defense Network Information Center (22.230.19.19) that I see on my phone as evidenced by their IP being involved in just about anything this phone does.

As I said before, there are no cracked or hacked apps. It being rooted is as close to it being hacked as it's going to get and there are no custom ROMs available for this phone; the T-Mobile Alcatel Onetouch Fierce. I thought that maybe it had something to do with the weather app I have installed but that app developer wouldn't be using military computers that I've been told are for military use only according to the DoD Network Information Center technician I spoke with yesterday.

Was just told that I could take screen shots and not have to photograph the screen as I did yesterday. Not up to speed on Android yet but getting there.

Here are two more screen shots this morning. It appears that any time an app accesses the Internet that information is sent to the DoD Network Information Center or passes through that facility. Their IP address is 22.230.19.19.

Android Firewall allowed apps access log file:



Android Firewall blocked apps access log file:

15th January 2014, 05:13 PM |#6  
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Is it possible that someone is spoofing the DoD address and if so wouldn't it have to be a pretty sophisticated operation to know what network my cell phone is on at any given moment?

Again, there is no cracked or hacked software on my phone. What is on it is straight from the Play Store either purchased or free.
16th January 2014, 12:03 AM |#7  
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There is one major cell phone carrier routing their cell phone network through the Department of Defense Network Information Center and only one person seems interested in this issue? I would have thought that this thread would have had many posts other than mine and the other lone post.
17th January 2014, 03:08 AM |#8  
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It's nothing. No disrespect to your curiosity. But the Internet and its infrastructure is massive and those websites that supposedly trace IPs to maps are way off. It's just a data centre it's referencing and it could be anything that is hitting that IP, such as a time and date check. Time and date servers are often based on the most reliable large data centres. Those large data centres often have contracts with large clients such as the DoD.
17th January 2014, 10:52 PM |#9  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by BlobLobba

It's nothing. No disrespect to your curiosity. But the Internet and its infrastructure is massive and those websites that supposedly trace IPs to maps are way off. It's just a data centre it's referencing and it could be anything that is hitting that IP, such as a time and date check. Time and date servers are often based on the most reliable large data centres. Those large data centres often have contracts with large clients such as the DoD.

No. It is something. I called the data center myself and was told that they only provide service to the military. They have no commercial customers and have no relationship with cell phone companies. It's strictly for the U.S. military and its various branches, agencies, and organizations. Others have seen this on their phones as well and straight out of the box.

Here are two blog articles from THREE YEARS AGO when someone else noticed this more than suspicious activity.

Why is the Defense Department snooping on my phone?

DoD IP address mysteriously unreachable

The above blog writer believes he may have solved the mystery but many of those commenting on his conclusion aren't so convinced.
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17th January 2014, 11:52 PM |#10  
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Revolution!
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Boone

No. It is something. I called the data center myself and was told that they only provide service to the military. They have no commercial customers and have no relationship with cell phone companies. It's strictly for the U.S. military and its various branches, agencies, and organizations. Others have seen this on their phones as well and straight out of the box.

I hear ya bro. Problem is the "sheople" won't, and don't want to. One thing to consider here is that this site seems to cater more toward the "big guys" who are ultimately THE problem. For example; I am on a smaller carrier, but I have one of the most popular Android devices on the planet. There is all kinds of info here for the same phone offered by the "big guys" but in order to get anywhere with my device, I had to go elsewhere to find what I needed. They ARE part of the problem! Anyone who is "in bed" with the "big guys" aren't going to give you the time of day.

I'm definitely not qualified to offer any educated advise or answers but I can say that you would most likely be taken more seriously if you find other arenas to discuss this issue. I am just as concerned as you may be, if not more so because it goes much deeper than cellular devices, or even technology of any kind. I have my suspicions about almost anything these days. That's what comes with being a thinker and seeking truth.

Best of luck to you, keep up the good work. A revolution is in order!
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20th January 2014, 04:28 AM |#11  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tony Boone

It's a T-Mobile Alcatel Onetouch Fierce. Three weeks old at most. Only have a couple of free apps on it and no more than five paid apps. Rooted. Factory ROM.

Something strange happened to my T-Mobile Samsung Exhibit II 4g the day before I had to buy this new one. The Exhibit II 4g was working fine and then went into an unrecoverable boot loop. Not just any boot loop but one that wouldn't take or allow me to perform a factory reset. It was as though someone had sent some malicious code to the phone and sent it into a death spiral.

I could take the battery out of it, put it back in, and it would immediately boot up. Normally I'd have to hold the power button on for about three seconds but not then. Nothing I could do but replace the phone and I lost a lot of precious data in the process.

Interesting scenario you seem to be having, sounds as though you are or were forced to buy this unit....which relates to some topics
in [INFO][Who is Spying & Monitoring you] Google removes privacy feature from Android , that's why I linked this thread there, maybe when you get to the bottom of this, we will know for sure. one option would be to test your SIM card on another phone using the same setup wifi. or try assigning a static IP to your phone and observe it.

Frankly, hackers are much more sophisticated than being able to be blocked / tracked by a simple firewall. But all avenues should be explored. good luck

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