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[Release] ADP1 1.1 (official)

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By coolbho3000, Inactive Senior Recognized Developer on 10th March 2009, 01:44 AM
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It's about time! This is not the holiday update - this is ADP1's real RC9/RC33!

http://android-developers.blogspot.c...r-android.html

Download at HTC: http://www.htc.com/www/support/android/adp.html

Back in December, the Android Dev Phone 1 (ADP1) went on sale, giving developers access to unlocked hardware for their work. A few weeks ago, consumers with retail devices received an over the air update with the 1.1 release of Android. I know that many developers will be pleased to hear that today, our colleagues at HTC have released a 1.1 version of Android for the Android Dev Phone which you can install on your device. If you have questions about the process of updating your device, you can ask the mailing list we've set up for such questions.

This new system image is fully compatible with Android 1.1. To see a list of everything that's new, you can review the notes from the 1.1_r1 SDK. This update also includes support for searching by voice, and priced apps in the Android Market.

Some developers have asked about the support for copy-protected apps on developer devices, and indeed there is a limitation you should be aware of. Many developers are concerned about the unauthorized redistribution of their applications, so they make use of the copy-protection feature (known as "forward locking") which prevents applications from being copied off devices. However, developer phones like the ADP1 allow for unrestricted access to the device's contents, making it impossible to enforce copy protection. As a result, the Market application on such devices is not able to access copy protected apps, whether they are free or paid. If you choose to add copy protection when you upload your application to the Android Market, then you won't be able to test it on the ADP1's Android Market client. Your application will always be accessible to users who have standard configurations though, and if your application (whether it is free or paid) is not copy-protected it will appear on all devices, including developer configurations.

If you own an Android Developer Phone, I definitely suggest you take advantage of this update. There's lots of good stuff in there, and the new software is backward compatible with Android 1.0, too. The original 1.0 system image is also now available, you need to downgrade for any reason. Happy coding!
 
 
10th March 2009, 02:22 AM |#2  
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how is this different to the ADP1.1h that we already have thanks to JF?
10th March 2009, 02:47 AM |#3  
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I was wondering that too. I see new one is supposed to have voice search for example, but we alread have that in 1.1h. I guess 1.1h is some kind of "halfway there" image.
10th March 2009, 03:33 AM |#4  
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The new release supports paid applications.
http://blogs.zdnet.com/Burnette/?p=848
10th March 2009, 04:31 AM |#5  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by aoi0123

The new release supports paid applications.
http://blogs.zdnet.com/Burnette/?p=848

The current adp1.1h supports paid apps.
10th March 2009, 04:41 AM |#6  
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You beat me to it
10th March 2009, 06:12 AM |#7  
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I'd really like to see a JF version of this (pretty please JF ) because it's "newer" and way more "official" than the leaked Holiday update.

Oh, and this does not work with DRM apps - and Google simply explains why in their post about this new update. Those other websites clearly misinterpreted it, and didn't read carefully (Google is essentially sugarcoating the situation). Any way to get around it? Maybe install RC33 Market binary? I'd really like to get my hands on some nice games, and stop playing my Stop At 500 game hundreds of times over and over again.
10th March 2009, 07:10 AM |#8  
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Someone mentioned in an earlier thread that installing rc33 then adp1.1 without a wipe allowed them to see all apps. We may just need the odex file, who knows...
5th August 2011, 02:52 AM |#9  
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Angry Will they offer new dev images for the new carrier based devices running 2.3?
Flashing your Android Dev Phone with a Factory System Image

This page provides instructions on how you can flash your Android Dev Phone with a factory Android platform system image and associated radio image. From here, you can also download the actual image binaries, as well as relevant tools to help you flash the images to your device.

With these system image files, you can:

Keep your Dev Phone up to date with the latest Android system images
Test your application on multiple Android platform versions, to ensure compatibility
Restore a corrupted device to a factory state.

Overview

The sections below describe two alternative methods that you use to flash your device with a factory Android system image:

Flashing the device using an updated recovery image (recovery-image method)

This approach involves using the adb tool, available in the Android SDK, to copy updated radio and recovery images to the device's recovery partition on the SD card. It's a straightforward operation that you can run in a Windows, OS X, or Linux environment. If you are an Android application developer, this method of flashing your device is recommended. Note that to use this method, the device must have the original factory bootloader that came with the device (hboot 0.95.3000).
Flashing the device using fastboot commands (fastboot method)

This approach is slightly more complicated and involves using the adb tool to update the radio image and the fastboot tool to flash a system image to the device. Flashing your device in this way is useful if you need to install the radio and system images independently or you are already familiar with fastboot and are using it successfully in your environment. To use this method, your device must have a fastboot-compatible bootloader. Having the original factory bootloader included on ADP devices is not required.

Before you get started, decide which of these two methods is appropriate for you, then follow the instructions below, in the order given. The flashing process for both methods is similar ??the main difference is that the recovery-image method does not require the fastboot tool. Rather than using fastboot to flash a system image to the device, you use adb to copy an updated recovery image to the device. All other steps are the same.


Supported Devices

The system images provided on this page are designed only for installation on devices that meet the following requirements:

HTC Dream hardware platform only
Device must have the original factory bootloader (hboot 0.95.3000) or a development bootloader that supports fastboot

You cannot flash these system images to other hardware platforms or to a version of HTC Dream hardware that doesn't have an original factory bootloader, unless the device bootloader supports fastboot (fastboot is described in the next section). Additionally, you cannot flash these images to a retail devices such as the T-Mobile G1 because the images do not have the appropriate cryptographic signatures.


Get the Tools

To flash a system image to your device, you need to have access to the proper tools.

If you are flashing your device using the recovery-image method, you need the adb tool, included in the Android SDK.
If you are flashing your device using the fastboot method, you need the fastboot tool, in addition to the adb tool.
For either method, if you are working in a Windows development environment, you should update your USB driver to the version provided in the Android SDK.

Adb Tool

The adb tool is included in the Android SDK. If you have already installed the Android SDK on your local machine, you will find adb in the <sdk>/tools/ directory.

If you do not have the Android SDK, download the latest version from this location and install it:

http://developer.android.com/sdk/index.html

Once you install the SDK, the adb tool will be available to you.

Fastboot Tool

If you are flashing your device using the fastboot method, you need the command-line tool called fastboot.

The fastboot source code is available in the Android open source repository and is compiled whenever you build from that tree. If you've built from the Android open source tree, you will find the fastboot executable in this location:

<build-dir>/out/host/<platform>/bin/


For your convenience, you can also download the fastboot executable directly, using the links below.
Platform Download Size (bytes) Checksum
Fastboot binary, Windows fastboot.exe 992202 6bbf05d97585c3c515bdb172eb9e7d12
Fastboot binary, OS X
(Unzip the file before executing) fastboot-mac 59071 ed784e50cfcaba3c60380c5f448aa354
Fastboot binary, Linux
(Unzip the file before executing) fastboot 61887 9851bb6ad29cd4b60c9ba9d011ba9efd

On OS X and Linux, you can store the fastboot executable anywhere on your machine. On Windows, you must store the fastboot executable where it can find the AdbWinApi.dll file (included with the Android SDK), otherwise it will not work properly. The recommended place to store the fastboot executable on Windows is with the other tools in the Android SDK, in the <sdk>/tools directory. On all platforms, you may want to add the location to your PATH, for convenience.

USB Driver

If your development machine is running Windows, you should make sure to update your USB driver before continuing. For your convenience, the Android SDK (1.0 r2 or later) includes an updated USB driver that you can install. For more information, see Setting up a Device for Development on the Android Developers Site.


Download the Image Packages

To flash a new system image to your device, you need to download two image packages to your local machine.

If you are flashing your device using the recovery-image method, you need to download a recovery image package and a radio image package only.
If you are flashing your device using the fastboot method, you need to download a system image package and a radio image package only.

The table below provides links to the downloadable image packages. The sections provide more information about the contents of each package and how you should handle it after download.
Version Image Download Size (bytes) Checksum
Android 1.6 Radio Image ota-radio-2_22_19_26I.zip 9181622 aeecdb49b74a0d4bb67f9d8af70c1889
System Image signed-dream_devphone_userdebug-img-14721.zip 40118457 a06a3d24ff4cbe5c81317e41891e6965
Recovery Image signed-dream_devphone_userdebug-ota-14721.zip 47202626 b3e12b004c155761a10b1a848288e0c3
Android 1.5 Radio Image ota-radio-2_22_19_26I.zip 9181622 aeecdb49b74a0d4bb67f9d8af70c1889
System Image signed-dream_devphone_userdebug-img-150275.zip 38027127

5ca85a135ff1ddd41643237577cb8ec4
Recovery Image signed-dream_devphone_userdebug-ota-150275.zip 46907411 01c19785eef97b06409f52fed568feff
Android 1.1 Radio Image ota-radio-1_22_14_11.zip 9131603 5520b3386707b570afc0e593aa854586
System Image signed-dream_devphone-img-142608.zip
(Same as img-130444, except with Voice Dialing enabled.)
36845408 5278ae25c10946cb12f449ac1edc5923
signed-dream_devphone-img-130444.zip 36794552 b74cee3f66f673bd09954bf990985ec2
Recovery Image signed-dream_devphone-ota-142608-b.zip
(Replaces 142608. Adds support for downgrade. See troubleshooting note)
45680454 c3436df93e4cbdd946868d6badafddb0
Android 1.0 Radio Image ota-radio-1_22_12_29.zip 9128783 66853a7ffbb14f291d9fa446494ca420
System Image signed-dream_devphone-img-116222.zip 35840707 3a9c88935d8772405b6094b68f449095

Radio Image Download

For both methods of flashing your device, you need to download a radio image package from the list of links in the table above.

Each Android platform version is designed to run on top of a specifc version of the radio firmware. Typically, each successive release of the Android platform relies on a newer version of the radio firmware, so whenever you are planning to flash a new system image to your device, whether upgrade or downgrade, you should also update the radio firmware to the version expected by the platform. If you do not update your radio image, the system may encounter problems.

Use the links provided in the previous section to download the radio image package that corresponds to the system image you downloaded.

Once you've downloaded a radio image package, you do not need to extract it - you can reference the image package directly from adb commands, as described in the sections below. You can store the radio image package anywhere on your machine, but make sure to store to maintain its version-specific naming.

System Image Download

If you are flashing your device using the fastboot method, download the signed system image package(s) that you need from the list of links in the table above. Multiple versions of the Android platform are available, so make sure that you understand what version(s) you need and what version(s) you are downloading.

For development, you should select the lowest possible Android platform version that meets the needs of your applications. For example, if you are working in the Android 1.1 SDK and your application is using APIs introduced in Android 1.1, then you should download the Android 1.1 system image. If you are using the Android 1.1 SDK but your application does not use Android 1.1 APIs, then using Android 1.0 image is sufficient.

For testing, consider downloading all platform versions with which your application is compatible, then running your applications on those platform versions to ensure that they work as designed.

Each system image package is a .zip archive that includes several images that you will flash to your device:

A boot image - contains the kernel and initrd.
A recovery image - contains files used for rebuilding/updating the system.
A system image - contains the Android platform/apps of the specified version.

Note that the images in each package are mutually dependent, so you must flash them all to your device together. For example, you should not flash a system image to the device without also flashing the boot and recovery images included in the same image package.

Once you've downloaded a system image package, you do not need to extract it ??you can reference the image package directly from fastboot commands, as described in the sections below. You can store the system image package anywhere on your machine, but make sure to store to maintain its version-specific naming.

Recovery Image Download

If you are flashing your device using the recovery-image method, download the recovery image package(s) that you need from the list of links in the table above. Currently, a recovery image packages is available only for the Android 1.1 platform version.

Each recovery image package is a .zip archive containing the full contents of a recovery partition, including:

A boot image - contains the kernel and initrd.
A recovery image - contains files used for rebuilding/updating the system.
A system image - contains the Android platform/apps of the specified version.
A radio image - contains the compatible radio firmware.

Note that the images in each recovery package are mutually dependent, so you must copy them all to your device together. For example, you should not copy a system image to the device without also copying the boot and recovery images included in the same image package.

Once you've downloaded a recovery image package, you do not need to extract it - you can reference the image package directly from adb commands, as described in the sections below. You can store the recovery image package anywhere on your machine, but make sure to store to maintain its version-specific naming.


Update the Device Radio Firmware

For both the recovery-image and fastboot methods, you need to update the radio firmware on the device before you go on to update the system. This step is necessary both to ensure that a compatible radio image exists on the device and to satisfy version prerequisites enforced by the bootloader when loading the updated recovery image.

After you've installed the tools and downloaded a system/recovery image package and corresponding radio image package, follow the steps below to update the radio firmware on the device.

Ensure that a SD card is inserted in the device
Boot the device normally
Connect the device to your development machine over USB.
At a command line, ensure that adb recognizes your device by issuing this command:

$ adb devices


You should see your device in the console output generated by the command
Use the adb push command to copy the contents of the radio image package to the update.zip archive on the device's SD card:

$ adb push <radio-image-package>.zip /sdcard/update.zip


The command prints the number of bytes copied and the elapsed time, then completes. However, note that the files are still being copied in the background, so wait a minute or two before continuing. If you continue too soon and terminate the operation before it is complete, you will get a "bad update.zip" error later, when you try to install the update.

To ensure that the entire radio image package is copied before you continue, use this command:

$ adb shell sync


When sync returns, all of the data has been copied to the device.
Reboot the device into recovery mode by holding down the HOME key during reboot. When the device enters recovery mode, it displays a "!" icon.
With the recovery console displayed, open the sliding keyboard and hold down the ALT+l key combination to enable log output in the recovery console.
Next, hold down the ALT+s key combination to install the update. An "installing update" icon and progress bar (or a similar status message) are displayed ??when the progress bar completes, the installation is finished.
Press the HOME-BACK key combination to write the radio image, update the firmware, and automatically reboot. Note that if you do not use HOME-BACK at this point, the device will not load the updated radio image. After writing the radio image, the device shows a "updating firmware" icon for a few seconds and then automatically reboots in normal mode.

After the device reboots normally, you can update the system image or recovery image, as described in the next sections. To check the radio image version, you can start the device in fastboot mode.


Copy the Recovery Image Package to the Device

For the recovery-image method only, after you've successfully updated the radio firmware, the next (and final) step is using the adb tool to copy the recovery image package to the device SD card. (If you are using the fastboot method, you do not need to copy a recovery image to the device - see Flash the System Image Package to the Device instead.)

To copy the recovery image to the device SD card, follow these steps:

Ensure that the SD card containing the updated radio image is inserted in the device
Boot the device normally
Connect the device to your development machine over USB.
At a command line, ensure that adb recognizes your device by issuing this command:

$ adb devices


You should see your device in the console output generated by the command
Use the adb sync command to copy the contents of the radio image package to the update.zip archive on the device's SD card:

$ adb push <recovery-image-package>.zip /sdcard/update.zip


The command prints the number of bytes copied and the elapsed time, then completes. However, note that the files are still being copied in the background, so wait a minute or two before continuing. If you continue too soon and terminate the operation before it is complete, you will get a "bad update.zip" error later, when you try to install the update.

To ensure that the entire recovery image package is copied before you continue, use this command:

$ adb shell sync


When sync returns, all of the data has been copied to the device.
Reboot the device into recovery mode by holding down the HOME key during reboot. When the device enters recovery mode, it displays a "!" icon.
With the recovery console displayed, open the sliding keyboard and hold down the ALT+l key combination to enable log output in the recovery console.
Next, hold down the ALT+s key combination to install the update. An "installing update" icon and progress bar (or a similar status message) are displayed ??when the progress bar completes, the installation is finished.
Press the HOME-BACK key combination to write the recovery image, update the firmware, and automatically reboot. Note that if you do not use HOME-BACK at this point, the device will not load the updated radio image. After writing the image, the device shows a "updating firmware" icon for a few seconds and then automatically reboots in normal mode.

After the device reboots normally, the operation is complete.

For discussions and support about updating your Android Dev Phone, please head over to the Android-DevPhone-Updating group.


Flash the System Image Package to the Device

For the fastboot method only, after you've successfully updated the radio firmware, the next (and final) step is using the fastboot tool to flash the system image package to the device. Note that you should always update the radio image whenever you update the Android system image on your device. (If you are using the recovery-image method, you do not need to flash the system image package to the device - see Copy the Recovery Image Package to the Device instead.)

Follow the steps below to flash a system image package to your device:

Boot the device in fastboot mode.

To enter fastboot mode, power up the device (or reboot it) while holding down the BACK key. Hold the BACK key down until the bootloader screen is visible and shows "FASTBOOT". The device is now in fastboot mode and is ready to receive fastboot commands. If you want to exit fastboot mode at this point, you can hold down the keys MENU+SEND+END (on the Android Dev Phone, SEND is the "Call" key and END is the "End call" key).

Note that the bootloader screen may vary across devices. For Android Dev Phone devices, the bootloader screen shows an image of skateboarding robots. Other devices may show a different image or color pattern. In all cases, the bootloader screen shows the text "FASTBOOT" when in fastboot mode. The bootloader also shows the radio version.
Connect the device to your development machine over USB, if it isn't currently connected.
You may want erase the contents of the userdata partition, by using this fastboot command:

$ fastboot erase userdata


This will remove all of the installed applications and their data, but it is a useful step when debugging because it ensures a clean execution environment for the application. Erasing the user data may also be necessary when you are flashing a lower (downgrade) platform version to your device. However, it is not strictly necessary to erase the userdata partition when upgrading to a higher (upgrade) platform version, which is the typical use-case in consumer devices.
You may also want to erase the cache partition, using this fastboot command:

$ fastboot erase cache


Note that, rather than using separate fastboot commands to erase the userdata and cache partitions, as described in the previous steps, you can simply supply the -w option when flashing the system image, which has the same result.
Next, use this fastboot command to flash the contents of the image package to the device:

$ fastboot update <imagepackage>.zip [-w]


With this command, fastboot copies all of the images in <system-image-package>.zip to the appropriate partitions on the device. During the process, it prints status messages to the command shell. Depending on your bootloader version, fastboot may also print status messages to the bootloader screen.

When all image are copied to the device successfully, fastboot displays a success message.

For information about other fastboot commands, use

$ fastboot


Reboot the device. In most cases, fastboot should reboot the device automatically after copying the image files.

If necessary, you can reboot the device manually using these fastboot commands:

$ fastboot reboot


or

$ fastboot reboot-bootloader


You can also reboot from the device by holding down the key combination MENU+SEND+END.

After rebooting, the device should start normally. If the device does not start normally, you can try flashing it again. If you did not erase the userdata partition and the device hangs during boot, try erasing the userdata partition and then reboot.

For discussions and support about updating your Android Dev Phone, please head over to the Android-DevPhone-Updating group.


Troubleshooting

fastboot.exe (on Windows) doesn't detect the ADP device properly

In some cases, Windows detects the ADP1 bootloader as a USB mass storage device, preventing fastboot.exe from accessing it. To resolve the issue, you can dissociate the USB Mass Storage driver from your ADP1 on your Windows machine and install the proper driver instead, as described in the steps below:

Boot the device into fastboot mode, as described above, and connect the device to your machine over USB.
Navigate to Start > Control Panel > System > Hardware > Device Manager > Universal Serial Bus Controllers. Observe that the ADP device is listed as a USB Mass Storage Device.
Right-click USB Mass Storage Device and select Uninstall. Windows then prompts you with a "New Hardware Found Wizard" message. If Windows doesn't prompt you, you can manually re-detect devices by selecting Action > Scan for hardware changes.
Install the USB driver included in the Android SDK, as described in Setting up a Device for Development on the Android Developers site.

If you are unable to use fastboot successfully, note that you can use the recovery-image method to flash an updated system image to the device, provided the device has the original factory bootloader. See the Overview for more information, then follow the instructions starting from the top of this document.

When installing updated radio firmware, the recovery console fails to open the update.zip file

As described in Update the Device Radio Firmware, you need to copy the contents of the radio image package to the update.zip archive on the device's SD card, then install the update using the recovery console. In some cases, when you try to install the update, the operation fails because of a problem with the update.zip file. This type of failure usually occurs when you start the installation before all of the radio files are copied to the update.zip archive. To resolve the issue, copy the files again to update.zip, this time waiting a minute or two before starting the installation, to ensure that all of the files are copied successfully.

Cannot downgrade to Android 1.1 with recovery package 142608

If you are using the recovery-image method and had previously downloaded and the Android 1.1 recovery package signed-dream_devphone-ota-142608.zip, you should make sure to download the replacement recovery package signed-dream_devphone-ota-142608-b.zip (see the download link at the top of this page).

This is necessary because the recovery package signed-dream_devphone-ota-142608.zip prevents you from downgrading to it from a higher version of the recovery image. Therefore, if you upgrade to the Android 1.5 recovery image, you won't be able to downgrade to Android 1.1 unless you use the replacement package signed-dream_devphone-ota-142608-b.zip.
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