FORUMS
Remove All Ads from XDA

Htc Hd2 Screen

245 posts
Thanks Meter: 40
 
Post Reply Email Thread
Ok, firstly i would like to apologize for posting an ignorant post judging ignorant people. however, I would like to redeem myself by providing my so-called "proof" that the Htc Hd2/Leo uses a resistive touch screen to provide multi-touch capabilities. Might I add that Htc is a company that has historically never fiddled around with expensive capacitive technology on most of its phones. Even on such a highend device such as the Hd. so it only makes sense that they secretly figure out some resistive/capacitive tech for a new powerhouse like the hd2.

So first off i want to post the pictures of the Hd2 which show the previously mentioned dots on the screen which would indicate a dual layer type of setup for the screen, which in turn is an indication of some sort of pressure sensitivity.




AS you can see the dot matrix is very visible. This matrix has been reported to be visible on the palm pre as well. http://forums.palm.com/palm/board/me...cending&page=1

This following website explains the technology behind the capacitive screen which is used on the Iphone. I am only an iphone user because of the multi-touch capability. i have had an htc 8125 (my first smartphone ever) and an Att Tilt. I was able to get used to the ease of usability and decided to get a refurbished low-end 3G. I only paid 150 at the time. so this was a steal compared to my att tilt. any way i digress. that debate has been beaten to death.

http://electronics.howstuffworks.com/iphone2.htm

"Multi-touch Systems
To allow people to use touch commands that require multiple fingers, the iPhone uses a new arrangement of existing technology. Its touch-sensitive screen includes a layer of capacitive material, just like many other touch-screens. However, the iPhone's capacitors are arranged according to a coordinate system. Its circuitry can sense changes at each point along the grid. In other words, every point on the grid generates its own signal when touched and relays that signal to the iPhone's processor. This allows the phone to determine the location and movement of simultaneous touches in multiple locations. Because of its reliance on this capacitive material, the iPhone works only if you touch it with your fingertip -- it won't work if you use a stylus or wear non-conductive gloves.

A mutual capacitance touch-screen contains a grid of sensing lines and driving lines to determine where the user is touching.

A self capacitance screen contains sensing circuits
and electrodes to determine where a user is touching.

The iPhone's screen detects touch through one of two methods: Mutual capacitance or self capacitance. In mutual capacitance, the capacitive circuitry requires two distinct layers of material. One houses driving lines, which carry current, and the other houses sensing lines, which detect the current at nodes. Self capacitance uses one layer of individual electrodes connected with capacitance-sensing circuitry.

Both of these possible setups send touch data as electrical impulses."

So that covers the Iphone. As you can see the dots are nowhere in this technology. So claims that the iphone has them are simply incorrect. In the next website ill show you why the resistive screens require these dots.

http://www.touchscreenguide.com/touchscreen/res.html



"Resistive

Resistive touch screens have a flexible top layer and a rigid bottom layer separated by insulating dots, with the inside surface of each layer coated with a transparent conductive coating. Voltage applied to the layers produces a gradient across each layer. Pressing the flexible top sheet creates electrical contact between the resistive layers, essentially closing a switch in the circuit."



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Resistive_touchscreen

"Resistive touchscreens are composed of two flexible sheets coated with a resistive material and separated by an air gap or microdots. When contact is made to the surface of the touchscreen, the two sheets are pressed together, registering the precise location of the touch. Because the touchscreen senses input from contact with nearly any object (finger, stylus/pen, palm) resistive touchscreens are a type of "passive" technology.
For example, during operation of a four-wire touchscreen, a uniform, unidirectional voltage gradient is applied to the first sheet. When the two sheets are pressed together, the second sheet measures the voltage as distance along the first sheet, providing the X coordinate. When this contact coordinate has been acquired, the uniform voltage gradient is applied to the second sheet to ascertain the Y coordinate. This operation occurs instantaneously, registering the exact touch location as contact is made.
Resistive touchscreens typically have high resolution (4096 x 4096 DPI or higher), providing accurate touch control. Because the touchscreen responds to pressure on its surface, contact can be made with a finger or any other pointing device."

And now i would to provide links to different companies which are offering the NEW RESISTIVE MULTI-TOUCH DISPLAY technology. This is probably what i believe is in the Palm Pre and will be in the new HTC HD2.

http://www.gizmag.com/getac-multi-touch/13078/

here is how that tech works, however from a different company doing the same thing, Stantum Technology.....

http://www.touchuserinterface.com/20...lti-touch.html

http://www.umpcportal.com/2009/02/mu...-touchscreens/

http://www.engadget.com/2009/02/19/s...face-on-video/

So in conclusion i think ive made my argument. If you believe what those trade-show reps say on the showroom floor then thats your prerogative. All im saying is that maybe those people who fumble with the phones on the show floor are just told what to say and what not to say. ive seen countless videos where they are asked questions that they have no idea on how to respond to because they dont understand the technology behind the devices that they are presenting.

Even if Htc is implementing multi-touch tech in this new device, i am not convinced that it is being executed through the same means as the Iphone capacitive screen. I am NOT saying that it is better in any way. I am just stating the differences between the two that i think most people will not understand when the phone comes out.

please comment with sources if youd like to refute any of this. thanks. hope im not bursting anyones bubble here.

vince

p.s. i will go back to winmo for this phone next year!!
24th October 2009, 11:43 PM |#2  
Member
Flag Ashrafieh
Thanks Meter: 1
 
More
What about those reviews that specified that styluses don't work like this one?
25th October 2009, 12:18 AM |#3  
Dark Fire's Avatar
Senior Member
Thanks Meter: 1
 
More
You obviously don't realise that HTC has officially confirmed that the HD2 has a capacitive touchscreen. Read this.

Also, capacitive technology and multi-touch was experimented with on the Touch Diamond and Touch Pro, and most of their Android-powered devices have had capacitive touchscreens.
25th October 2009, 12:56 AM |#4  
tazbo28's Avatar
OP Senior Member
Flag Davis, CA
Thanks Meter: 40
 
Donate to Me
More
i actually am aware that they have officially declared a multi-touch screen. and have called it capacitive. however that does NOT explain the dots on the screen. i am just stating the obvious. if there exists a capacitive-titled screen that uses those micro-dots and layers please show me where to find it.

also, the article simply stated "the stylus is gone". they seemingly assumed this from the claims of capacitive screen. However it is very difficult to know for sure if anyone has ever tried using a stylus in the screen ON CAMERA. i havent seen it tested yet in any video or in any article. please direct me. without a proper test i still wont believe it. also i was under the the impression that the Touch Diamond and Pro actually had two separate screen technologies being used on the same phone. however they were not both used for the screen alone. so this fact is useless in relation to my argument above.
25th October 2009, 01:37 AM |#5  
Dark Fire's Avatar
Senior Member
Thanks Meter: 1
 
More
It is not useless in relation to your argument because one of the points that you use to support your argument is that HTC has not been experimenting with capacitive technology. The Touch Diamond and Touch Pro capacitive scroll wheels, followed by capcitive screens on the Dream, Magic and Hero, and then the capacitive stylus patent, clearly demonstrate the fact that they are playing with, and shifting towards, capacitive technology.

Don't forget that at least most the HD2's currently floating around do not have the final hardware.

I have no doubt that HTC is using capacitive touch sensitivity in the HD2 (have you ever heard of them getting their own specs wrong!?), but it is quite possible that they are doing it in a different way to Apple. I did read somewhere that one of HTC's excuses for lack of multi-touch until recently was Apple's patents - the presence of dots on the Pre too supports that argument. However, if that were the case, the Hero should have dots too - can anyone confirm/deny dots on the Hero?
25th October 2009, 04:31 AM |#6  
tazbo28's Avatar
OP Senior Member
Flag Davis, CA
Thanks Meter: 40
 
Donate to Me
More
very interesting indeed. I would be convinced if someone could confirm this also. i guess the real issue im trying to figure out is if the screen is using the electric conductivity of the finger for input and not pressure sensitivity. i believe some people are labeling this phone as a capacitive phone merely based on the fact that it has multi-touch capabilities, even though htc is making its own claims. as stated resistive screens can do this as well and so they shouldnt be labeled as capacitive. i guess we wont know until SOMEONE just tries it out!!!
25th October 2009, 04:34 AM |#7  
Member
Thanks Meter: 0
 
More
Look i'll admit I don't really understand the technologies behind these phones, but if I do understand what you are saying, doesn't that mean if HTC are making a phone which does all the multi touch stuff an iphone/capacitive screen can and has somehow used resistive touch tech with it (meaning we can use styluses as well as fingers) mean that this is a really good thing?

seems to me if this were true would there be anything negative about it?
25th October 2009, 11:23 AM |#8  
Senior Member
Flag Huntington Beach, CA
Thanks Meter: 72
 
More
didnt someone (possibly bel3rfonte) verified that the HD2 has a glass-like screen? If it did, wouldnt that eliminate the notion of pressure/resistive screen?

I totally get your point, that HTC is labeling this resistive multi-touch technology as "capacitive," but on the other hand, we won't know until we (the consumers) get the final hardware in our hands. HTC have had capacitive screens on their android phones so it's not like they havent played around with it.

I'd say let's give HTC the benefit of the doubt for now and reserve judgment until we can get a clear answer on what kind of screen they're actually using.
25th October 2009, 11:40 AM |#9  
Senior Member
Flag ASDA
Thanks Meter: 4
 
More
all things said, i think resistive multi-touch has its own advantages. if it is that is!
25th October 2009, 12:45 PM |#10  
Senior Member
Flag Sydney
Thanks Meter: 7
 
More
Please, correct me if I'm wrong.

However, all I see is that there is a new generation of resistive screens on to the market to multi-touch capabilities... As stated in the first post the technology is similar but very different all the same.

But would you all not agree the acid-test would be... will the Leo work with a stylus? As all new resistive multitouch screens allow this (this is from the links in the first post) and as we all know that capacitive will not.

Cheers
25th October 2009, 01:58 PM |#11  
Dark Fire's Avatar
Senior Member
Thanks Meter: 1
 
More
I've just been looking through the official specs of HTC's android devices, and they don't actually say in the specs that the devices have capacitive screens. The HD2's capacitive screen is mentioned in its specs. Weird...
Post Reply Subscribe to Thread

Guest Quick Reply (no urls or BBcode)
Message:
Previous Thread Next Thread
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes