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OCUV, HAVS, etc... - what does it mean?

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By rr3636, Member on 20th July 2010, 09:15 AM
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what does all these stand for, and what do they actually do?

OCUV (is this faster with less battery consumption???)
OC
UV
HAVS
r3.1 (or other numbers)
De-odexed
odexed
kernel

what I'v read is that you can have kernel, rom and radio separatly installed and they work together. correct?
 
 
20th July 2010, 10:23 AM |#2  
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ocuv = overclocked/undervolted, means the kernel can be overclocked or undervolted, overclocked means you run the cpu at alot higher clock speed than normal, meaning better performance, undervolted means you run the cpu clock speed at alot less than normal, giving you better battery performance.

oc - overclocked

uv - undervolted

havs - never heard of this

r3.1 - sounds like the rom version a dev has given his rom lol

deodexed - The Java virtual machine in Android is a Dalvik Virtual Machine, designed to operate on processor-constrained and memory-constrained devices like smart phones. The files that a Dalvik Virtual machine consumes are DEX files - which are Java files rendered by a utility called dx. After the files are rendered by DX they are loaded into a virtual machine and the classes in them are optimized by a utility called dexopt. This results in an "optimized DEX" - an ODEX. To hack such code, the files must be "DE-ODEX'ed," if you will, which is accomplished with a utility called deodexerent.

odexed - Odex stands for Optimized DEX. This is just the machine compiled version of the classes.dex file. To get from the odex version to classes.dex the term deodex is used. consider odexed roms as compressed roms that give you alot more space but cannot be themed

kernal - the kernel is the core set of files that run an os, it is responsible for handling data processing at a hardware level it also controls system resorces like battery ect
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20th July 2010, 10:58 AM |#3  
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I believe when people say MCR r3.1, they refer to Modaco Custom Rom version 3.1.
20th July 2010, 11:22 AM |#4  
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havs stands for 'hybrid adaptive voltage scaling'


The purpose of HAVS is to minimize the power used by the CPU by determining and setting the optimal voltage. At the same time, the maximum voltage by which HAVS can scale to is fixed to a specified voltage depending on the CPU frequency in order to prevent scaling to a higher voltage than what is normally used at a specified voltage. The optimal voltage is actively determined for each frequency and temperature. HAVS actively adjusts the CPU voltage as the CPU frequency and temperature changes.

Quote:
Originally Posted by rr3636

what I'v read is that you can have kernel, rom and radio separatly installed and they work together. correct?

You need all of them to operate your phone.
The radio is the basic piece of software on your phone, it comes pre installed but you can update it to a newer version. You don't have to do this all the time as it stays untouched.

With every ROM comes a kernel, but some ROMS offer you different kernel updates that you can apply AFTER you installed the Full ROM.
20th July 2010, 11:25 AM |#5  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by x01a4

havs stands for 'hybrid adaptive voltage scaling'


The purpose of HAVS is to minimize the power used by the CPU by determining and setting the optimal voltage. At the same time, the maximum voltage by which HAVS can scale to is fixed to a specified voltage depending on the CPU frequency in order to prevent scaling to a higher voltage than what is normally used at a specified voltage. The optimal voltage is actively determined for each frequency and temperature. HAVS actively adjusts the CPU voltage as the CPU frequency and temperature changes.

you learn somthing new every day on here
20th July 2010, 11:36 AM |#6  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by AndroHero

undervolted means you run the cpu clock speed at alot less than normal, giving you better battery performance.

No, undervolting means running your CPU at a lower maximum VOLTAGE.
It DOES give you a better battery performance, but some CPUs (not every CPU is produced equally) doesn't like being overclocked/undervolted resulting in an unstable or odd behaviour. You have to test yourself what your CPU can handle
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22nd October 2011, 02:26 PM |#7  
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Quote:
Originally Posted by x01a4

No, undervolting means running your CPU at a lower maximum VOLTAGE.
It DOES give you a better battery performance, but some CPUs (not every CPU is produced equally) doesn't like being overclocked/undervolted resulting in an unstable or odd behaviour. You have to test yourself what your CPU can handle

Quote:
Originally Posted by x01a4

The purpose of HAVS is to minimize the power used by the CPU by determining and setting the optimal voltage. [...] The optimal voltage is actively determined for each frequency and temperature.

The first poster suggests that manual uv tuning is required while the second poster seems to suggest that the uv values are determined by the phone.

If manual, how to you tune it? Increase voltage after each crash/hang?
If auto, how does the phone know when it's pushing the envelope? Considering that the poster claims that it's temp and speed adaptive, that's quite an impressive feat. It's exactly what I'd want to have though.
22nd October 2011, 02:34 PM |#8  
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the kernel's governor decides what CPU frequency the CPU needs to run at under its current load.

On SVS Kernels, this frequency is a SET voltage. On HAVS Kernels, the frequency is a RANGE of voltages which the kernel decides on.

Some kernels do allow you to set those voltages or voltage ranges, see manU kernels for example.

If you follow the red link in my signature, there is a kernel info thread which may help understand a bit better.
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