A question regarding the google’s support

kfirbep

Senior Member
Feb 9, 2012
439
10
38
Hello everyone, I just bought the new chromecast with google tv, but then I started to read the google will require new devices on March to have AV1 codec. I was surprised to see that the chromecast doesn’t support it. Now I guess that on my end, there is not a big difference if the device supports AV1 but I was wondering, if it doesn’t support AV 1, will it still get updates from google of future android updates like the android 11? If not I would prefer to wait for their next chromecast so I will have better and longer support
thank you in advance!
 
Last edited:

96carboard

Senior Member
Jul 17, 2018
105
52
28
This is a much more interesting requirement than just "I want better stuff". AV1 is basically the "royalty free" alternative to HEVC. Its not necessarily BETTER than HEVC, but you don't have to pay royalties to MPEG-LA for its use.

Basically, what is going on is this; Google believes that their media streaming mass is now enough that they can beat down MPEG-LA. Up until now, MPEG-LA has railroaded every silicon vendor into paying them royalties to include AVC and HEVC, and to LEAVE OUT royalty free codecs like Theora, VP9, and AV1. This has, in turn, forced MEDIA VENDORS to use AVC and HEVC encoding for the media that they are distributing, and also paying royalties to MPEG-LA on those -- because they have no alternative since the recipient hardware doesn't support Theora, VP9, or AV1.

But now that Google is making it a requirement, the expectation is that silicon vendors are now going to go back to MPEG-LA and say "Hey screw you, I'll still pay you the royalties for HEVC, but we have to strike out this part of the contract that says we can't also include AV1. We can't sell the chip at all without it, so if you don't like it, suck an egg."

In the short term, which means over the next few YEARS, this will have no impact on you at all, because the media vendors will continue to have to support legacy hardware. But after all of the hardware in use was made AFTER the AV1 requirement came into effect, the media vendors will have the option to drop HEVC and save on the royalties. After the media vendors drop HEVC, then so can the hardware vendors and MPEG-LA can die.

Even if you are a consumer of pirated media, remember that pirates don't pay royalties and operate with the objective of sticking it to "the man". That means that the stuff pirates encode will continue to use AVC and HEVC in order to maximize consumption.


Now as far as gaining future updates goes, Google is saying that they want NEW devices to support it. Legacy hardware will certainly NOT be limited in this manner. Also, Google isn't subject to these requirements -- hypocrisy is legally permissible, although it would likely be bad form.


And don't get caught up in the wait for all the amazing stuff that is coming "next year". There will *always* be something better just around the corner if you wait, so you will end up waiting literally forever.
 
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kfirbep

Senior Member
Feb 9, 2012
439
10
38
This is a much more interesting requirement than just "I want better stuff". AV1 is basically the "royalty free" alternative to HEVC. Its not necessarily BETTER than HEVC, but you don't have to pay royalties to MPEG-LA for its use.

Basically, what is going on is this; Google believes that their media streaming mass is now enough that they can beat down MPEG-LA. Up until now, MPEG-LA has railroaded every silicon vendor into paying them royalties to include AVC and HEVC, and to LEAVE OUT royalty free codecs like Theora, VP9, and AV1. This has, in turn, forced MEDIA VENDORS to use AVC and HEVC encoding for the media that they are distributing, and also paying royalties to MPEG-LA on those -- because they have no alternative since the recipient hardware doesn't support Theora, VP9, or AV1.

But now that Google is making it a requirement, the expectation is that silicon vendors are now going to go back to MPEG-LA and say "Hey screw you, I'll still pay you the royalties for HEVC, but we have to strike out this part of the contract that says we can't also include AV1. We can't sell the chip at all without it, so if you don't like it, suck an egg."

In the short term, which means over the next few YEARS, this will have no impact on you at all, because the media vendors will continue to have to support legacy hardware. But after all of the hardware in use was made AFTER the AV1 requirement came into effect, the media vendors will have the option to drop HEVC and save on the royalties. After the media vendors drop HEVC, then so can the hardware vendors and MPEG-LA can die.

Even if you are a consumer of pirated media, remember that pirates don't pay royalties and operate with the objective of sticking it to "the man". That means that the stuff pirates encode will continue to use AVC and HEVC in order to maximize consumption.


Now as far as gaining future updates goes, Google is saying that they want NEW devices to support it. Legacy hardware will certainly NOT be limited in this manner. Also, Google isn't subject to these requirements -- hypocrisy is legally permissible, although it would likely be bad form.


And don't get caught up in the wait for all the amazing stuff that is coming "next year". There will *always* be something better just around the corner if you wait, so you will end up waiting literally forever.
Thank you!! I didn’t know all of that, this whole thing is way more clear to me right now.