• Introducing XDA Computing: Discussion zones for Hardware, Software, and more!    Check it out!

Ad Blocker that actually works wanted....

Search This thread

dcarvil

Senior Member
Apr 20, 2016
475
249
Well. I am afraid it did not work.
Everything has been reset after the phone re-start. Static is back to dynamic IP and the Ips are back to the old ones...

I don't know why it would reset, but there are a few things you can try.

1. You may be able to set the DNS servers in your router. Some routers allow it, some don't. Setting it there would block ads for all devices, not just your phone.

2. Maybe deleting the network and adding it back as static would make it stick. You should also mark the device as static in your router settings.

3. If you try the private DNS suggestion, use dns.adguard.com instead of the DNS IPs. On my phone, private DNS works only on mobile data, though, not on wifi.
 

tdvolland

Senior Member
Feb 23, 2015
137
3
I don't know why it would reset, but there are a few things you can try.

1. You may be able to set the DNS servers in your router. Some routers allow it, some don't. Setting it there would block ads for all devices, not just your phone.

2. Maybe deleting the network and adding it back as static would make it stick. You should also mark the device as static in your router settings.

3. If you try the private DNS suggestion, use dns.adguard.com instead of the DNS IPs. On my phone, private DNS works only on mobile data, though, not on wifi.

Thank you, that pretty much answers it...
I DID change to static, but, I may have that expressed myself unclear, that also changes back. The name of the entered private dns.adguard server is still there, but the numbers have changed back. The name has a save options after chnaging, the numbers do NOT.

I never use mobile data, only wifi. So, no chance there.
Thank you for trying. I suppose living with the garbage ads is the price of progress from Android 5 to 11.
 
Last edited:

tdvolland

Senior Member
Feb 23, 2015
137
3
Try this:

Thank you...
Search finally took me to Private DNS Server.
So I set the private dns server to the adguard one, changed the entries to the 94....., , cleared tha cache, and restarted the phone...
dns.adguard.com has remained, as there is a save option..
But all the DNS1 and DNS2 server numbers... have been changed back to original ones...
 
Last edited:

VD171

Senior Member
Jun 21, 2012
1,931
2
1,608
127.0.0.1
LG K10
Samsung Galaxy J7
Thank you...
Search finally took me to Private DNS Server.
So I set the private dns server to the adguard one, changed the entries to the 94....., , cleared tha cache, and restarted the phone...
dns.adguard.com has remained, as there is a save option..
But all the DNS1 and DNS2 server numbers... have been changed back to original ones...
I got you.
 

dcarvil

Senior Member
Apr 20, 2016
475
249
The name has a save options after chnaging, the numbers do NOT.

I think that is your problem, you are not (cannot) saving the DNS settings change. First see if you can scroll down to the Save button - maybe it is just off the screen. If that is not the case, your best bet is to ask in the forum for your phone about how to save network settings.

If you are able to save your DNS settings, you should also set the device as static in your router.
 

sureshbabucmc

New member
Jan 17, 2014
2
1
Dear all,
If you are trying to get rid of removing ads in phone please do the follow the below steps.

1. If you are using a Redmi, MI, Poco ... Go to settings>>Password and Security >> Authorisation and revocation >> Turn off MSA, MIUI daemon, Downloads, Xiaomi Sim activation services, battery and performance, Get apps.

2. Go to settings >> Privacy >>Ads >> opt out of ads personalization.

3. Any other phone.. Do check above remove Authorisation and Remove unwanted Authorisation.


Restart device

Enjoy.
 
On my old phone android 5.1.1 blokada worked really well, basically not a single ad.
Now, with new android and new blokada, I have permanent ads all over the place and I am continuosly harrased by other "free" functions blokada installs without asking .
I can not even switch their vpn off!

What is the best ad blocker now?
I mean an adblocker, that will block ads, and that is it. If I want anything else, I will look for it.

I do NOT mean an ad blocker that works with the browser. I basically never use the browser on the phone. I am talking about ads from apps..


Thank You

Not to suggest the same thing as everyone else, but I use Blokada 5 on my phone right now and it's great.

A tracker blocking app should NOT frequently install functions you don't want. That sounds like a fake copy. The real Blokada 5 is always up to date on F-Droid, the FOSS Android app store.

Blokada 5 doesn't use a VPN unless you pay for that service, but it does use your device's VPN slot. I recommend setting it as an always-on VPN, which still allows you to turn it off from the app or a quick settings button.
 

pucko1

New member
Dec 30, 2016
3
1
AdGuard is the most advanced adblocker. I have been using it for a couple of years now, on both my Android phone and Win10 laptop.

It works also in apps, and is highly configurable. It costs money, but is worth it.

For the moment it has been blocked on Google Playstore, but it can easily be downloaded as an APK from the internet.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SeriesXM

smithbill

Senior Member
Jun 24, 2007
232
59
Liverpool
If your phone is rooted, install AdAway. It's the simplest & easiest solution. AdAway also includes a VPN based ad blocker option (which I have not used) which may also work on non-rooted phones.

Blockada is a VPN based ad blocking solution. These work by creating a 'local VPN' server on your phone (used to be a 'key' icon appears in the status bar) with filter lists to block ad server IP addresses. Then all your phone network traffic goes 'through' the local VPN on your phone and because of the filter lists, ads get blocked. So Blockada depends on creating a local VPN on your phone through which all internet traffic must pass in order to be filtered of ads. If you switch off the VPN or use an app that is able to circumvent the VPN created by Blockada on your phone, then ads won't be filtered.

I believe AdGuard is also a VPN based solution, although the 'ad blocking VPN' is at their end, not on your phone. Hence you have to pay them for the service. I believe it works very well, but obviously costs money.

Changing DNS servers is not really going to help you block in-app ads. It might help with some web browser ads, but in general, it's not worth fiddling with your DNS server IP addresses.

The DNS servers your phone uses on WiFi, are handed out by your WiFi router. And your router in turn gets the DNS IP addresses from your ISP. You can configure most routers to hand out different DNS IP addresses rather than those your ISP wants you to use. You can use Google DNS IPs, Cloudflare, OpenDNS etc etc. They may help speed up your internet lookups & may block some ads (try OpenDNS).

Network based ad blockers such as Pihole (can run on a £10 Raspberry Pi Zero) can be set up on your local home WiFi network and it can help to block ads on your WHOLE network, not just on your phone. However, it's not exactly 'childs-play' to set up.

My recommendations:
1) if rooted, used the root based ad blocker in AdAway
2) if not rooted, try the VPN based ad blocker in AdAway
3) use Blockada but do not mess with trying to switch off VPN stuff - that's how Blockada works & it needs it!
4) if IT knowledgeable, set up Pihole on your network
5) if none of the above, pay for AdGuard
6) if you don't want to pay, live with the intrusive ads
 
  • Like
Reactions: Wills_X

smithbill

Senior Member
Jun 24, 2007
232
59
Liverpool
One other thing to clarify - I believe Blockada includes a VPN server service which is paid for. This routes your internet traffic through their VPN servers (to encrypt, speed up & remove ads etc). This is a paid VPN service (like NordVPN, Windscribe etc).

This should not be confused with the local VPN server that Blockada sets up on your phone in order to allow it to filter out ads on your phone's internet traffic. If you fiddle with that or switch it off, then you're effectively switching off Blockada (hence the reason you may believe Blockada doesn't actually work).
 

pucko1

New member
Dec 30, 2016
3
1
If your phone is rooted, install AdAway. It's the simplest & easiest solution. AdAway also includes a VPN based ad blocker option (which I have not used) which may also work on non-rooted phones.

Blockada is a VPN based ad blocking solution. These work by creating a 'local VPN' server on your phone (used to be a 'key' icon appears in the status bar) with filter lists to block ad server IP addresses. Then all your phone network traffic goes 'through' the local VPN on your phone and because of the filter lists, ads get blocked. So Blockada depends on creating a local VPN on your phone through which all internet traffic must pass in order to be filtered of ads. If you switch off the VPN or use an app that is able to circumvent the VPN created by Blockada on your phone, then ads won't be filtered.

I believe AdGuard is also a VPN based solution, although the 'ad blocking VPN' is at their end, not on your phone. Hence you have to pay them for the service. I believe it works very well, but obviously costs money.

Changing DNS servers is not really going to help you block in-app ads. It might help with some web browser ads, but in general, it's not worth fiddling with your DNS server IP addresses.

The DNS servers your phone uses on WiFi, are handed out by your WiFi router. And your router in turn gets the DNS IP addresses from your ISP. You can configure most routers to hand out different DNS IP addresses rather than those your ISP wants you to use. You can use Google DNS IPs, Cloudflare, OpenDNS etc etc. They may help speed up your internet lookups & may block some ads (try OpenDNS).

Network based ad blockers such as Pihole (can run on a £10 Raspberry Pi Zero) can be set up on your local home WiFi network and it can help to block ads on your WHOLE network, not just on your phone. However, it's not exactly 'childs-play' to set up.

My recommendations:
1) if rooted, used the root based ad blocker in AdAway
2) if not rooted, try the VPN based ad blocker in AdAway
3) use Blockada but do not mess with trying to switch off VPN stuff - that's how Blockada works & it needs it!
4) if IT knowledgeable, set up Pihole on your network
5) if none of the above, pay for AdGuard
6) if you don't want to pay, live with the intrusive ads
Hi, Smithbill!

Yes to all, especially point 5: "if none of the above, pay for AdGuard". I am constantly travelling, and want an easy solution to work on all my devices, and since I'm dealing in crypto and other banking stuff, I'd rather not use a rooted phone.

Yes, AdGuard is VPN-based, and promises to stop phishing, etc. They also seem to have many servers in the world, and when I use their dedicated DNS:s browsing is fluent enough.

Thank's for your info!
 

tdvolland

Senior Member
Feb 23, 2015
137
3
One other thing to clarify - I believe Blockada includes a VPN server service which is paid for. This routes your internet traffic through their VPN servers (to encrypt, speed up & remove ads etc). This is a paid VPN service (like NordVPN, Windscribe etc).

This should not be confused with the local VPN server that Blockada sets up on your phone in order to allow it to filter out ads on your phone's internet traffic. If you fiddle with that or switch it off, then you're effectively switching off Blockada (hence the reason you may believe Blockada doesn't actually work).

Thanks, but that is exactly what I meant when I complained about receiving garbage apps, when all I want is an ad-blocker THAT WORKS !!!
Btw I have been using a real VPN for over ten yerars...
 

tdvolland

Senior Member
Feb 23, 2015
137
3
If your phone is rooted, install AdAway. It's the simplest & easiest solution. AdAway also includes a VPN based ad blocker option (which I have not used) which may also work on non-rooted phones.

Blockada is a VPN based ad blocking solution. These work by creating a 'local VPN' server on your phone (used to be a 'key' icon appears in the status bar) with filter lists to block ad server IP addresses. Then all your phone network traffic goes 'through' the local VPN on your phone and because of the filter lists, ads get blocked. So Blockada depends on creating a local VPN on your phone through which all internet traffic must pass in order to be filtered of ads. If you switch off the VPN or use an app that is able to circumvent the VPN created by Blockada on your phone, then ads won't be filtered.

I believe AdGuard is also a VPN based solution, although the 'ad blocking VPN' is at their end, not on your phone. Hence you have to pay them for the service. I believe it works very well, but obviously costs money.

Changing DNS servers is not really going to help you block in-app ads. It might help with some web browser ads, but in general, it's not worth fiddling with your DNS server IP addresses.

The DNS servers your phone uses on WiFi, are handed out by your WiFi router. And your router in turn gets the DNS IP addresses from your ISP. You can configure most routers to hand out different DNS IP addresses rather than those your ISP wants you to use. You can use Google DNS IPs, Cloudflare, OpenDNS etc etc. They may help speed up your internet lookups & may block some ads (try OpenDNS).

Network based ad blockers such as Pihole (can run on a £10 Raspberry Pi Zero) can be set up on your local home WiFi network and it can help to block ads on your WHOLE network, not just on your phone. However, it's not exactly 'childs-play' to set up.

My recommendations:
1) if rooted, used the root based ad blocker in AdAway
2) if not rooted, try the VPN based ad blocker in AdAway
3) use Blockada but do not mess with trying to switch off VPN stuff - that's how Blockada works & it needs it!
4) if IT knowledgeable, set up Pihole on your network
5) if none of the above, pay for AdGuard
6) if you don't want to pay, live with the intrusive ads

Thank you.
But the point of my questions is your #3... Blokada does NOT work.
My mistake was, that I should have made it clear that I am not talking about internet, I am talking about the apps on the phone, which include installed ads.
 

smithbill

Senior Member
Jun 24, 2007
232
59
Liverpool
Thank you.
But the point of my questions is your #3... Blokada does NOT work.
My mistake was, that I should have made it clear that I am not talking about internet, I am talking about the apps on the phone, which include installed ads.
"Not all adverts are created equal"

There are different types of ads and I'm unclear as to which ones you are referring to - those contained in the Onkyo Flac Music player app? those that tend to appear on web pages? or as you say "not talking about internet, I am talking about the apps on the phone" by which I assume you mean intrusive OS/launcher ads 'foisted' upon the user by the likes of Amazon. The latter are indeed insidious and should (in my opinion) be stamped-out - in particular I object to Amazon charging an extra few £'s to sell consumers a device with the ads switched off. To be clear, it's unlikely Blokada can help you with these kind of ads (although I've not actually tested it), but there are other methods available.

Also, to be clear with the internet/browser based ads - Blokada DOES work at blocking these ads and it does it by clever & ingenious use of your phone's own ability to set up a VPN connection and using the VPN to literally filter out the URLs of the ad serving sites.

However, not all ads are served by 3rd party ad serving sites. Some are actually coded into the app itself. This might be the case with your Onkyo Flac Music Player. My own opinion is that these are objectionable & may even violate PlayStore policy depending on the nature of the ads. Building ads into the app in this way, I believe to be 'bloat' and much worse than what you described as "garbage apps" which have a tendency towards adding additional 'paid for' features which you don't need or want in the app.

Perhaps the reason you see your Onkyo Flac Music Player ad'less on old Androids using Blokada, but with ads on newer Android even with Blokada, is not because Blokada doesn't work any longer, but because the app developer moved from 3rd party served ads to in-app bloat ads purposely to frustrate those using apps like Blokada and AdAway to disrupt their revenues by blocking their ads.

For this reason, if I were you, I would consider dumping Onkyo Flac Music Player who think it's okay to bloat their app with ads unless you're prepared to pay them £7.99 for the 'Unlocker', and consider switching to other Flac capable players such as VLC.

I hope the above ramblings have helped to provide some options, but to be clear once again, Blokada does indeed work at blocking ads, but perhaps just not the particular ads you want rid of in the free version of Onkyo Flac Music Player.
 
Last edited:

tdvolland

Senior Member
Feb 23, 2015
137
3
"Not all adverts are created equal"

There are different types of ads and I'm unclear as to which ones you are referring to - those contained in the Onkyo Flac Music player app? those that tend to appear on web pages? or as you say "not talking about internet, I am talking about the apps on the phone" by which I assume you mean intrusive OS/launcher ads 'foisted' upon the user by the likes of Amazon. The latter are indeed insidious and should (in my opinion) be stamped-out - in particular I object to Amazon charging an extra few £'s to sell consumers a device with the ads switched off. To be clear, it's unlikely Blokada can help you with these kind of ads (although I've not actually tested it), but there are other methods available.

Also, to be clear with the internet/browser based ads - Blokada DOES work at blocking these ads and it does it by clever & ingenious use of your phone's own ability to set up a VPN connection and using the VPN to literally filter out the URLs of the ad serving sites.

However, not all ads are served by 3rd party ad serving sites. Some are actually coded into the app itself. This might be the case with your Onkyo Flac Music Player. My own opinion is that these are objectionable & may even violate PlayStore policy depending on the nature of the ads. Building ads into the app in this way, I believe to be 'bloat' and much worse than what you described as "garbage apps" which have a tendency towards adding additional 'paid for' features which you don't need or want in the app.

Perhaps the reason you see your Onkyo Flac Music Player ad'less on old Androids using Blokada, but with ads on newer Android even with Blokada, is not because Blokada doesn't work any longer, but because the app developer moved from 3rd party served ads to in-app bloat ads purposely to frustrate those using apps like Blokada and AdAway to disrupt their revenues by blocking their ads.

For this reason, if I were you, I would consider dumping Onkyo Flac Music Player who think it's okay to bloat their app with ads unless you're prepared to pay them £7.99 for the 'Unlocker', and consider switching to other Flac capable players such as VLC.

I hope the above ramblings have helped to provide some options, but to be clear once again, Blokada does indeed work at blocking ads, but perhaps just not the particular ads you want rid of in the free version of Onkyo Flac Music Player.

Thank you very much for your comprehensive answer. Unless many others I ceratinly do not considerthis to be ramblings...

I basically use my phone only to be able to reached when needed, I mysealf make maybe one call a month.
I use it as translator, navigator, musicplayer, camera and very rarely the internet. I am a great and longtime friend of VLC, but found the android version a lot less satisfying.
I basically do everything on this desktop and usually stay off-line the rest of the day. And of course I stll use Win7 at least as they still deliver updates.... Do I need to mention that I am too busy with better things thanto be a gamer? :)

If Blokada works perfectly on Android 5, but they are unwilling to update it to the same quality for newer Androids, why would I use it? I now KNOW, that adguard pro works, so it cannot be that complicated to write an update. The phone is off wifi most of the time, and has a no-mobile-data setting, yet adguard still works...

So, thank you for your help, I really appreciate it. Quality answers like yours are rarity
 

Top Liked Posts

  • There are no posts matching your filters.
  • 4
    On my old phone android 5.1.1 blokada worked really well, basically not a single ad.
    Now, with new android and new blokada, I have permanent ads all over the place and I am continuosly harrased by other "free" functions blokada installs without asking .
    I can not even switch their vpn off!

    What is the best ad blocker now?
    I mean an adblocker, that will block ads, and that is it. If I want anything else, I will look for it.

    I do NOT mean an ad blocker that works with the browser. I basically never use the browser on the phone. I am talking about ads from apps..


    Thank You

    I use the adguard DNS servers - https://adguard.com/en/adguard-dns/overview.html
    2
    I use uBlock Origin, Ghostery, and Privacy Badger in my browser.
    AdAway at the device level.
    piHole at the Network level.
    1
    AdGuard is the most advanced adblocker. I have been using it for a couple of years now, on both my Android phone and Win10 laptop.

    It works also in apps, and is highly configurable. It costs money, but is worth it.

    For the moment it has been blocked on Google Playstore, but it can easily be downloaded as an APK from the internet.
    1
    If your phone is rooted, install AdAway. It's the simplest & easiest solution. AdAway also includes a VPN based ad blocker option (which I have not used) which may also work on non-rooted phones.

    Blockada is a VPN based ad blocking solution. These work by creating a 'local VPN' server on your phone (used to be a 'key' icon appears in the status bar) with filter lists to block ad server IP addresses. Then all your phone network traffic goes 'through' the local VPN on your phone and because of the filter lists, ads get blocked. So Blockada depends on creating a local VPN on your phone through which all internet traffic must pass in order to be filtered of ads. If you switch off the VPN or use an app that is able to circumvent the VPN created by Blockada on your phone, then ads won't be filtered.

    I believe AdGuard is also a VPN based solution, although the 'ad blocking VPN' is at their end, not on your phone. Hence you have to pay them for the service. I believe it works very well, but obviously costs money.

    Changing DNS servers is not really going to help you block in-app ads. It might help with some web browser ads, but in general, it's not worth fiddling with your DNS server IP addresses.

    The DNS servers your phone uses on WiFi, are handed out by your WiFi router. And your router in turn gets the DNS IP addresses from your ISP. You can configure most routers to hand out different DNS IP addresses rather than those your ISP wants you to use. You can use Google DNS IPs, Cloudflare, OpenDNS etc etc. They may help speed up your internet lookups & may block some ads (try OpenDNS).

    Network based ad blockers such as Pihole (can run on a £10 Raspberry Pi Zero) can be set up on your local home WiFi network and it can help to block ads on your WHOLE network, not just on your phone. However, it's not exactly 'childs-play' to set up.

    My recommendations:
    1) if rooted, used the root based ad blocker in AdAway
    2) if not rooted, try the VPN based ad blocker in AdAway
    3) use Blockada but do not mess with trying to switch off VPN stuff - that's how Blockada works & it needs it!
    4) if IT knowledgeable, set up Pihole on your network
    5) if none of the above, pay for AdGuard
    6) if you don't want to pay, live with the intrusive ads