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Android 11 Loss of "HD Audio" in Developer Settings

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bobbarker2

Senior Member
Aug 30, 2013
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I know before upgrading to 11, under Developer Settings in the bluetooth section, HD Audio was an accessible toggle that was on by default. I've upgraded to 11 and now HD Audio is off and inaccssible. I've since rooted the device, it passes safetynet, but I noticed this change before rooting.

AKxoWKP.jpg


Further, the 4a support LDAC, Sony's proprietary codec, but when connecting my Sony MDR-1000x to the device, it only gives me the option of SBC.
yD8ayjO.jpg


Has anyone else experienced problems with Bluetooth as shown above? It could be an 11 bug or related to unlocking the bootloader. I could see google doing something like that, where if the bootloader is unlocked, proprietary codecs like aptx, aptx HD, LDAC are no longer accessible. Audio quality is so much worse now, even SBC vs AAC.
 
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add144

Senior Member
Nov 30, 2009
570
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Jackson, MS
He's correct. Both the broadcasting and receiving devices must support the same codecs. It is unfortunate and surprising but still very much the case that a large (if not the majority) of bluetooth devices still don't support higher quality codecs like aptx, LDAC, etc.
 

bobbarker2

Senior Member
Aug 30, 2013
1,516
528
Sorry, i wasn't clear. There are two issues here:

The first being the "HD Audio" grayed out an toggled off, when it was not previously.

The second is the P4a on 11 is not using the LDAC codec when it did previously. The Sony headphones I referred to have connected to the P4A on 10 using LDAC. On 10, my car used AAC, now it uses SBC. It is not a matter of the device it is connecting to, something changed in the phone itself. Whether this is a bug in 11, a cause of unlocking the bootloader or something else needs to be tested.

Unless i'm just a fringe case and no one else sees these problems on their devices.
 

ngocdaothanh

New member
Oct 15, 2020
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> Has anyone else experienced problems with Bluetooth as shown above?

My Pixel 3 is not rooted. I'm experiencing this problem after upgrading to Android 11.

I could enable LDAC before, so I think this is a problem of Android 11.

> Try disable and enable again the Developer Options

On my Pixel 3, it's always disabled. I cannot enable it.

Edit:
I could enable LDAC:
* Install Sony's "Headphone" app.
* Connect headphone.
* Go to "Sound" tab, change "Sound Quality Mode" from "Priority on Stable Connection" to "Priority on Sound Quality".
 
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pasha_d

Senior Member
Nov 11, 2016
58
24
> Has anyone else experienced problems with Bluetooth as shown above?

My Pixel 3 is not rooted. I'm experiencing this problem after upgrading to Android 11.

I could enable LDAC before, so I think this is a problem of Android 11.

> Try disable and enable again the Developer Options

On my Pixel 3, it's always disabled. I cannot enable it.

Edit:
I could enable LDAC:
* Install Sony's "Headphone" app.
* Connect headphone.
* Go to "Sound" tab, change "Sound Quality Mode" from "Priority on Stable Connection" to "Priority on Sound Quality".
The proposed workaround was to toggle Developer Options slider itself. After you switch Developer Options on again, then option to enable HD audio wouldn't be greyed out and can be switched on.
 

_a!

Senior Member
Sep 13, 2018
171
38
Amazon Fire HD 8 and HD 10
What is HD audio? A search doesn't pull anything up

It means different things, depending on the context. Aptx-hd is a higher quality protocol than aptx. Bluetooth is a bit crap and can't transfer enough data for a losslessly encoded file - think flac, lossless wav etc - in realtime so they are lossily compressed. Depending on the ears, protocol, music and listener this may or may not have an audible difference. Different protocols (aptx, ldac etc) take different approaches, and there are licencing and "not invented here" elements too, as well as differing support for apple, android, linux, windows etc. Sony, for example, in recent months, has released some headphones without support for aptx-hd, opting for either higher-end ldac, or crappier common-denominator sbc. Not all devices support ldac. (Sony might implemented aptx-hd at a later date but it would be foolish to buy the newer headphones now and hope this will happen.)

HD audio also has a meaning apart from headphones and relating to the bitrate and sample depth of the music. It's silly to bother with anything at better quality rate than regular CD as both theory and practice demonstrates there's no audible difference. But it does allow marketing types - as well as deluded self-styled "audiophiles" - to suggest the wasting of a lot of money on useless placebos.

https://youtu.be/cIQ9IXSUzuM
https://xiph.org/video/vid2.shtml

https://web.archive.org/web/20200106153341/https://people.xiph.org/~xiphmont/demo/neil-young.html

(Not sure why the original page is no longer up!)
 
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DB126

Senior Member
Oct 15, 2013
15,266
10,043
...HD audio also has a meaning apart from headphones and relating to the bitrate and sample depth of the music. It's silly to bother with anything at better quality rate than regular CD as both theory and practice demonstrates there's no audible difference. But it does allow marketing types - as well as deluded self-styled "audiophiles" - to suggest the wasting of a lot of money on useless placebos.
Outstsnding - applies to many things in life (90% of XDA content) :)
 

bobbarker2

Senior Member
Aug 30, 2013
1,516
528
It means different things, depending on the context. Aptx-hd is a higher quality protocol than aptx. Bluetooth is a bit crap and can't transfer enough data for a losslessly encoded file - think flac, lossless wav etc - in realtime so they are lossily compressed. Depending on the ears, protocol, music and listener this may or may not have an audible difference. Different protocols (aptx, ldac etc) take different approaches, and there are licencing and "not invented here" elements too, as well as differing support for apple, android, linux, windows etc. Sony, for example, in recent months, has released some headphones without support for aptx-hd, opting for either higher-end ldac, or crappier common-denominator sbc. Not all devices support ldac. (Sony might implemented aptx-hd at a later date but it would be foolish to buy the newer headphones now and hope this will happen.)

HD audio also has a meaning apart from headphones and relating to the bitrate and sample depth of the music. It's silly to bother with anything at better quality rate than regular CD as both theory and practice demonstrates there's no audible difference. But it does allow marketing types - as well as deluded self-styled "audiophiles" - to suggest the wasting of a lot of money on useless placebos.

The HD Audio is an Android Developer Settings unique. Who knows what it actually does.

Of course you're never going to get the same fidelity from wired vs bluetooth, but you are 100% wrong if you think the codec (not protocol as you refered to them) makes no difference. SBC is the baseline codec supported on all audio bluetooth devices. AAC is the next step up, where even the untrained ear can hear the difference in quality. Sony has never released any audio device that support APTX/APTX-HD codecs because they are Qualcomm proprietary codecs. Meaning its direct competition to their own proprietary codec, LDAC. No audio devices besides Sony-made support LDAC. SBC has a bit rate is 330kbps at 44.1kHz while LDAC is 990kbps at 24bit/96kHz.

And audio is a lot more complex than "CD quality is best everything else is marketing BS". Many audiophiles prefer vinyl over CD as there is no digital to analog conversion. You should look up how digital audio becomes analog and the different properties that go along with this process. Basically everything you said is quantifiably wrong.
 
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_a!

Senior Member
Sep 13, 2018
171
38
Amazon Fire HD 8 and HD 10
Of course you're never going to get the same fidelity from wired vs bluetooth, but you are 100% wrong if you think the codec (not protocol as you refered to them) makes no difference.
I literally opened with "Aptx-hd is a higher quality protocol than aptx".

Sony has never released any audio device that support APTX/APTX-HD codecs because they are Qualcomm proprietary codecs.
Wrong:
https://www.sony.co.uk/electronics/headband-headphones/wh-ch700n/specifications

Meaning its direct competition to their own proprietary codec, LDAC. No audio devices besides Sony-made support LDAC.
LDAC has been part of the Android standard since Android 8, and is included in millions of phones and other devices. If something supports LDAC it is by definition an "audio device".


Many audiophiles prefer vinyl over CD as there is no digital to analog conversion. You should look up how digital audio becomes analog and the different properties that go along with this process.
Given that most music these days is recorded and edited digitally there has to be at least one D/A conversion so that it can be cut on vinyl, yes? There's no point quoting what audiophiles prefer as proof for anything, by the way. Red Book quality audio is objectively better on any metric. If you'd read/watched (and understood) the resources I linked to you'd know that, and that it's possible to *completely* and accurately sample analogue source, store digitally, and convert back to analogue without loss. Unless, of course, you're going to stand with the "audiophiles" against the likes of Shannon and Nyquist.

Basically everything you said is quantifiably wrong.
LOL!
 

bobbarker2

Senior Member
Aug 30, 2013
1,516
528

Wow you really got me there, I didn't know Sony had Made for Apple headphones. Notice what it doesn't support thoufh? LDAC. Why? Because the iPhone doesn't support LDAC.

So Sony was forced to buy licensing from Qualcomm so their Made for Apple headphones could use the higher quality codec and not just AAC or SBC.

My point still stands.


LDAC has been part of the Android standard since Android 8, and is included in millions of phones and other devices. If something supports LDAC it is by definition an "audio device".

Uh k? Not sure what you are even replying to.

Given that most music these days is recorded and edited digitally there has to be at least one D/A conversion so that it can be cut on vinyl, yes? There's no point quoting what audiophiles prefer as proof for anything, by the way. Red Book quality audio is objectively better on any metric. If you'd read/watched (and understood) the resources I linked to you'd know that, and that it's possible to *completely* and accurately sample analogue source, store digitally, and convert back to analogue without loss. Unless, of course, you're going to stand with the "audiophiles" against the likes of Shannon and Nyquist.

You obviously don't know what digital to analog means. There's no point in me typing more.
 

_a!

Senior Member
Sep 13, 2018
171
38
Amazon Fire HD 8 and HD 10
Wow you really got me there, I didn't know Sony had Made for Apple headphones. Notice what it doesn't support thoufh? LDAC. Why? Because the iPhone doesn't support LDAC.

So Sony was forced to buy licensing from Qualcomm so their Made for Apple headphones could use the higher quality codec and not just AAC or SBC.

My point still stands.




Uh k? Not sure what you are even replying to.



You obviously don't know what digital to analog means. There's no point in me typing more.

Not sure why you're bringing up Apple and iPhones. "Made for apple headphones?" Dunno about that; I bought it for my Android phone. It's made for anything with a compatible codec, no? Not sure why you're confused when I wrote (in a well-quoted message) that all Android devices supported LDAC in response to your incorrect comment "No audio devices besides Sony-made support LDAC". Not sure why you're confused about the obvious need to convert digital source material into analog for the production of vinyl. Everything I wrote was a fairly basic statement of fact; it's hard to see how anyone could misread it.
 

bobbarker2

Senior Member
Aug 30, 2013
1,516
528
Not sure why you're bringing up Apple and iPhones. "Made for apple headphones?" Dunno about that; I bought it for my Android phone. It's made for anything with a compatible codec, no? Not sure why you're confused when I wrote (in a well-quoted message) that all Android devices supported LDAC in response to your incorrect comment "No audio devices besides Sony-made support LDAC". Not sure why you're confused about the obvious need to convert digital source material into analog for the production of vinyl. Everything I wrote was a fairly basic statement of fact; it's hard to see how anyone could misread it.

The headphones you found have the Made for iPod and Made for iPhone trademarks on the cover sheet of the guide.

"Made for iPod” “Made for iPhone” mean that an electronic accessory has been designed to connect specifically
to iPod or iPhone, respectively, and has been certified by the developer to meet Apple performance standard."

AAC is mainly used by Apple products such as iPhones, and it provides higher sound quality than that of SBC

aptX is used by some Android smartphones, and it provides higher sound quality
than that of SBC.

aptX HD is used by some Android smartphones, and it provides higher sound
quality than that of aptX.

Is english not your first language?

Of course Sony isn't going to make Bluetooth headphones specifically for Apple or Android, but it's seems pretty clear that they could not include LDAC otherwise they would not be able to license the Apple trademarks, which for whatever reason they decided were more important than inclusion of the codec.

Android devices support LDAC. That means your BT audio will use LDAC if you are using a phone with Android 8.0+ AND a LDAC compatible bluetooth output device. And since LDAC is a Sony proprietary codec, It can not be utilized without a Sony-made hardware counterpart that supports LDAC. Is that worded precisily enough for you?

Vinyl is not the conversion of digital to audio. A vinyl record is an analog storage of an audio recording. When you play a vinyl record, there is no digital to analog conversion taking place. It is an analog source that is reproduced as sound waves through your speaker vibrations (analog).

a CD is a digital storage of an audio recording. Therefore in order to create sound waves via speaker vibration (analog), a digital to analog conversion must take place. The component that does this is called a DAC.

Saying the recording and mastering of the audio uses electronic devices has nothing to do with the playback of the stored media and whether a Digital to Analog Conversion (DAC) took place.

It gets much more nuanced but frankly I shouldn't have even taken the time to write this post so you can Google for more information.
 
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