How To Guide Android 13 is OUT! (August 15, 2022 - TP1A.220624.021) - Unlocking the Pixel 6 Pro bootloader & central repository of relevant links

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roirraW "edor" ehT

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Android 13 is OUT!

My tiny, early, very mini-review of Android 13 is here.

NOTE that if you use the full factory image to flash, to be safe, you'll want to flash to your current slot, change slots, and then flash again to the new slot.
Thanks to @Lughnasadh for sharing the news about this, starting here.

Also see here for the reason this was done:
Tweet about not being able to downgrade from Android 13.PNG



I've been following the android 13 upgrade postings and I'm surprised not more people know this.
If you add --force to fastboot update "fastboot --force update image-*" you can downgrade back to Android 12 as long as you wipe data.
I tried this as soon as I upgraded to 13 and yes you can downgrade down to Android 12 after upgrading with no noticable issues. The radio and every other image but the bootloader can be downgraded. But I only tried 003, 004 July images for oriole so I don't know about anything lower personally.

How to flash both slots using the full factory image BOTH SLOTS at the same time:
I don't know why, but it could be because of this: https://blog.quarkslab.com/attacking-titan-m-with-only-one-byte.html

The time frame lines up, antirollback commit was implemented in the days after Google told the researcher they are developing a fix.

And it's pretty big, allowing the ex-filtration of the secret keys inside the Titan and doing arbitrary code execution right on the Titan, a complete permanent compromise of the device. This is probably why Google is trying to stop people from downgrading to Android 12. Understandable why this is the first time Google is doing this, someone can resell this permanently compromised device to anyone, or do this to someone's phone. It's too late though, any Tensor device not updated to Android 13 could be forever compromised, so really the security theater of Pixel devices has just been torn down. We'll see if the Pixel 7 or Titan M3 fares better. Previous Pixel phones do not implement these OTP bit checks inside their bootloaders so I believe they are never going to have to worry about being stopped from downgraded, although they are susceptible to compromise.

The average person should never brick their phone from this, the GrapheneOS tester only had this happen because they were testing GrapheneOS on Android 13 and were capable of flashing a borked ROM.
But yes if you're updating to Android 13 manually via fastboot just run

  1. fastboot --slot all flash bootloader bootloader.img
  2. fastboot --slot all flash radio radio.img
  3. fastboot reboot bootloader
  4. fastboot --slot all update image.zip
    1. If using Magisk then use fastboot --slot all --skip-reboot update image.zip and select reboot to bootloader in fastbootd once fastboot is done flashing to flash your patched Magisk boot image.
If you are already on Android 13 then just perform steps 1-2-3.

How to flash both slots using the full factory image ONE SLOT at a time:
I use the full Pixel 6 Pro Factory Image to update each month. Use the same official latest ADB/Fastboot (SDK Platform Tools) you normally use. Edit the flash-all.bat (if on Windows - if on something else, edit the appropriate flash-all script file) and remove the "-w" and re-save it. If you want to keep the flash-all.bat from rebooting automatically after the update so that you can change slots and flash again, add fastboot --skip-reboot in the flash-all.bat after the fastboot update image-raven-xyNz.YYMMDD.BBB.zip line. Thanks, @Homeboy76 and @Lughnasadh!

Re-open the script file and confirm that you saved it with the "-w" removed, so it doesn't wipe your device.

From running Android:
Code:
adb reboot bootloader
(Let it reboot into Fastboot mode.  Make note of which active slot is listed on the Fastboot screen, third item from the bottom.)

flash-all.bat
(WITH "-w" removed.  Let it flash everything, will take several minutes.)

Let it boot up (and check the notifications for the update process to finish while Android is running)

adb reboot bootloader

On the Fastboot screen, change to the opposite slot with either:

fastboot --set-active=a
(If you're on slot b)

OR

fastboot --set-active=b
(If you're on slot a)

OR

[QUOTE="Homeboy76, post: 87298957, member: 4810220"]
I think you may want to use
[ICODE] fastboot --set-active=other[/ICODE]
it lowers the mistake threshold.
[/QUOTE]

flash-all.bat
(again)

13.0.0 (TP1A.220624.021, Aug 2022)FlashLinkd8ddfdca3af0b97b3b99460afdab3cf95a741f988dccd5122564c855a64baa36

Note that this is mainly for the officially listed "Unlocked" Pixel 6 Pro, available directly from the Google Store. All of this will also apply to any other (carrier-specific) variant of the Pixel 6 Pro which you can achieve an unlocked bootloader on. This includes T-Mobile and AT&T variants. It's likely Verizon variants will never be able to unlock their bootloader, or if so it will require paying the right person to do so.

Feel free to ask about general questions, but for anything that's specific to your variant, you should use one of the other already existing threads. You'll find Verizon, AT&T, and T-Mobile-related threads in those respective search results.

Here there be dragons. 🐉 I am not responsible for anything at all. 😹

Unlocking or locking the bootloader will wipe the device every single time, so be sure to have your data backed up before doing so, or better yet, just unlock it as soon as you get the device.


Keep in mind that unlocking the bootloader or rooting might affect your phone's capability to use banking apps such as Google Pay, your local bank's app, or even the ability to install some apps like NetFlix. See @Pekempy's thread Working SafetyNet with Pixel 6 Pro Android 12

If you're going to re-lock the bootloader, make sure the ROM you have on your phone is completely stock (by flashing the latest official firmware) BEFORE re-locking it.

There are no negative consequences if you unlock or re-lock the bootloader other than it will wipe your phone, and while unlocked you get a brief screen when you boot the phone telling you (and anyone who sees your phone at the time) that the bootloader is unlocked. You will also continue to receive updates (if you've merely unlocked the bootloader, you can take updates as normal) unlike Samsung, Sony, et cetera, which have permanent major consequences with reduced functionality even if you un-root and re-lock your bootloader. If you're actually rooted (not just bootloader unlocked), you'll have to perform extra steps to manually update each month, and to keep root/re-root.


All posts about Google Pay or banking will be reported to be deleted. Please keep this thread on-topic. There are at least one or two other How To Guide threads in this section in which folks discuss how to get around banking app restrictions when you're rooted or just have an unlocked bootloader. See @Pekempy's thread Working SafetyNet with Pixel 6 Pro Android 12
If users persist in discussing banking apps in this thread, I will have this thread locked and only update this first post when there is new and updated information regarding the subjects of the title of the thread: Unlocking the Pixel 6 Pro bootloader, rooting, and TWRP. See @Pekempy's thread Working SafetyNet with Pixel 6 Pro Android 12

Honorable mention to @Jawomo's aodNotify - Notification Light / LED for Pixel 6 Pro! (XDA link) / Notification light / LED for Pixel - aodNotify (Play Store link), which in my opinion restores useful functionality missing in most phones these days. It also solves some subjective issues some folks have with AOD (Always On Display), and/or solves/works around the problem where AOD is required for the optical fingerprint reader to work without the screen being on.​


Check warranty status - *may* reveal if a phone is refurbished, only if the phone was refurbished through Google - thanks to @Alekos for making me aware of the site.
Official Google Pixel Update and Software Repair (reported as of January 23, 2022 to still not be updated for the Pixel 6/Pro yet)

Google's Help Page for Find problem apps by rebooting to safe mode - this can be a lifesaver and keep you from having to do a restore to 100% complete stock or even from having to do a factory reset. This will deactivate all Magisk modules, and they'll remain deactivated even after you boot normally after briefly booting to safe mode. You can reenable the Magisk modules as you wish to try to narrow down the problem if it was caused by a Magisk module. This can even get things working again after a Magisk Module wasn't finished installing and potentially causing a bootloop.

Official Google Pixel Install fingerprint calibration software (also available at the bottom of the Update and Software Repair page above) - I believe this is only helpful if you've replaced the screen
Official Google Android Flash Tool (OEM Unlocking needs to be toggled on - you may not have to manually unlock the bootloader - the "site" will do that on its own)
OEM unlocking in developer options needs to be toggled on. I don't "believe" you have to actually do the "fastboot flashing unlock" command.

ADB/Fastboot, Windows Drivers, and unlocking the bootloader (thanks @sidhaarthm for confirming unlocking the bootloader works as intended, be sure to thank him in his post)
  • You'll need this if you're going to unlock the bootloader on your Pixel 6 Pro: SDK Platform Tools (download links for Windows, Mac, and Linux). Note that you can find links to download the tools elsewhere, but I wouldn't trust them - you never know if they've been modified. Even if the person providing the link didn't do anything intentionally, the tools could be modified without them being aware. Why take a chance of putting your phone security further at risk?
  • For Windows, get Google's drivers here Get the Google USB Driver (ADB will likely work while the phone is fully booted, but if you're like me, you'll need these drivers for after you "adb reboot-bootloader", to be able to use ADB and Fastboot.
  • Thanks to @96carboard for posting the details of unlocking the bootloader, be sure to thank him in his post. Unlocking or locking the bootloader will wipe the device every single time, so be sure to have your data backed up before doing so, or better yet, just unlock it as soon as you get the device. Keep in mind that unlocking the bootloader or rooting might affect your phone's capability to use banking apps such as Google Pay, or your local bank's app. If you're going to re-lock the bootloader, make sure the ROM you have on your phone is completely stock (by flashing the latest official firmware) BEFORE re-locking it. My experience on my Pixel 1 was that there were no negative consequences if you unlock or re-lock the bootloader other than it will wipe your phone, and while unlocked you get a brief screen when you boot the phone telling you (and anyone who sees your phone at the time) that the bootloader is unlocked. All of this should still be the case. You will also continue to receive updates. Unlike Samsung, Sony, et cetera, which have major consequences with reduced functionality even if you un-root and re-lock your bootloader. If you're actually rooted (not just bootloader unlocked), you'll have to perform extra steps to keep root/re-root.:


    The unlock process works like this:

    1) Take brand new fresh phone out of box. Do NOT put sim card in it, just power it on (you can put a SIM card if you want, you just don't have to).
    2) When it starts harassing you to join Google, hit "skip" and "remind me tomorrow" as applicable until you reach home screen. YOU DO NOT need to plug in a google account.
    3) Settings --> About --> Build number. Repeatedly tap it until it says you're a developer.
    4) Back --> Network --> WiFi and connect it.
    5) Back --> System --> Developer --> OEM unlocking (check), USB debugging (check), plug in USB, authorize on the phone when requested.

    Using the Platform Tools previously mentioned in command line/terminal:
    6) #
    Code:
    adb reboot-bootloader
    7) #
    Code:
    fastboot flashing unlock

    Now that you've unlocked it, it has been wiped, so repeat 1-4, then disable all the google spyware, and go ahead and start using it while waiting for aosp and root.

    Official Instructions for Locking/Unlocking the Bootloader
Personally, I would always use the official drivers Google provides unless they just don't work for whatever reason: Get the Google USB Driver (this is for Windows). They work for me. They are rarely updated, but they are every once in a great while, sometimes years in-between.
I agree with this. be careful using drivers or adb/fastboot tools. Some are fine, but there's no need for it really anymore. Google has made it very easy to install drivers and Platform-Tools (adb/fastboot tool).

Google provides the Fastboot/ADB tool (Platform-Tools) and Google USB Drivers (adb/fastboot interface). This will allow any Pixel to interface with Windows using the fastboot/adb protocol. Official Google USB Driver includes support for both the Fastboot and ADB driver interface. There are 3 main drivers (Fastboot, ADB and MTP/Portable File Transfer). The MTP/Portable File Transfer driver is built-in to Windows 7-11.

Fastboot/ADB Driver Interface - Official Download Link:
When flashing a full image or unlocking your bootloader, the fastboot interface is being used.

First Download official Google USB Drivers (it's a zip file). Extract the zip (important!). Right-click on the android_winusb.inf file and hit install. You can then restart your phone to the Bootloader Screen (hold vol-down while it restarts or turns on). When you plug in your phone, Windows Device Manager will show a new device at the top: Android Device: Android Bootloader Interface.

Using the ADB interface: It's the same driver. Enable USB Debugging on your phone, then plug it in to your computer. A prompt will appear on your phone (to allow USB Debugging). The driver in Device Manager will appear as Android Device: Android Composite ADB interface.

Now you can download and use Platform-Tools to flash an Android Image, OTA or run adb/fastboot commands.
Official Download Page
"Android SDK Platform-Tools is a component for the Android SDK. It includes tools that interface with the Android platform, such as adb, fastboot, and systrace"

It's best to make Platform-Tools available system-wide. Download Platform-Tools from the above link and extract it to your C:\ drive - that way you will have a folder to add to the PATH Environment under Window System Properties Menu, Advanced, Environment Variables, System Variables, PATH (google how to do this, very easy). What this does is allow adb/fastboot commands to be run from anywhere in the system, so you don't have to be in the platform-tools folder to run adb/fastboot commands and flash an Android Image (Official or Android Fork such as ProtonAOSP).

Rooting-related


No longer applies - Things that make rooting more complicated on Android 12
@V0latyle posted a new thread with some very important and fascinating information about the increased difficulty to root Android 12: Read this before rooting. Be sure to thank him there.

A list of the other important guides - be sure to thank the respective OPs
For all relevant guide threads just click the yellow "How To Guide" quick filter above the list of threads in the Pixel 6 Pro section.


TWRP (not made for the Pixel 6 Pro yet - will update when it has)
I would guess that this should be the appropriate URL for official TWRP custom recovery for the Pixel 6 Pro, but who knows when/if that will actually be made available, and it may become available unofficially in these forum sections before being made official. I'll adjust this URL as needed. https://twrp.me/google/googlepixel6pro.html.

Custom kernels for stock ROM(s)

Factory Images (requires an unlocked bootloader)
It's also handy to have to the full official firmware available, whether it's to recovery from accidents or for actual development. Note the official link to the general Factory Images for Nexus and Pixel Devices page. The following link goes directly to the Pixel 6 Pro (Raven) section: Pixel 6 Pro Factory Images. I prefer to actually bookmark a link to the device listed immediately below the device I want the firmware for, because Google dumbly (in my opinion) puts the latest firmware at the bottom of the list for each particular device, and that ends up making you scroll a lot after a year or two of monthly updates.

Note: You can still get the December 2021 Factory Images and OTA from this thread, if you need them for any reason: Alternate links to December - all full factory images and OTAs available

Full OTA Images (doesn't require an unlocked bootloader)

The usefulness of having Verity and Verification enabled (now that it's not needed for root) - post #2 below.

Regarding P6P 5G model numbers and capabilities - post #3 below.

List of all Pixel monthly security bulletins and Play System Updates - post #4 below.

How I root and update (which is identical whether rooting the first time or updating):
  • Use the latest Magisk Stable (in my case, I keep the app "hidden" / renamed)
  • Used the full firmware zip, extracted to the same folder as the latest Platform Tools (S:\platform-tools)
  • Extracted the new boot.img
  • Copied new boot.img to the phone
  • Patched the new boot.img with Magisk Stable
  • Renamed Magisk'd boot.img so I know what version of firmware it's for
  • Copied the Magisk'd boot.img back to the computer
  • Disabled all my Magisk Modules
  • Removed the "-w " from the flash-all.bat
  • Re-edited the flash-all.bat to verify I saved it with the "-w " taken out
  • Open a Command Prompt, navigated to S:\platform-tools
  • adb reboot bootloader
  • flash-all.bat
  • Let phone boot, unlock it, check that it's working, allow the update process to finish (gave it five minutes or so)
  • adb reboot bootloader
  • fastboot flash boot kernel.img (renamed Magisk'd boot.img)
  • fastboot reboot
  • Unlock, check everything's working
  • Re-enabled the most basic Magisk Modules which I was sure wouldn't cause a critical issue
  • Reboot, unlock, made sure everything's working
Back to modding!

I may append these first four posts with further useful information or links as needed.
 
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roirraW "edor" ehT

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Disabling Verity and Verification isn't required except for use with some custom kernels, but just rooting those custom kernels with the latest Magisk Stable v24.1 or higher should make them not require disabled Verity and Verification anymore.

A reminder that disabling Verity and Verification, at least if you've never disabled them before, will cause you to need to factory reset the device otherwise there will be corruption.

if you didnt disable before then it is enabled since the beginning. Disabling requires a full wipe.
It will show this image if you try to disable.

You can also verify it using adb shell with:
adb shell
su
avbctl get-verity
avbctl get-verification
1636658711744-png.5455805

The usefulness of having Verity and Verification enabled (now that it's not needed for root but IS still required for some custom kernels):

1. DM-Verity ( VB 1.0 ) verifies /system and /vendor - it was introduced with Android 4.4, modified with Android 7
2. Android Verified Boot ( VB 2.0 aka AVB ) additionally verifies /boot - it was introduced with Android 8, works on Project Treble enabled devices

Both are running a hash on the memory blocks mentioned of your device to ensure the integrity of your software and help prevent rootkits and the like.

If you disable VB 1.0 and/or VB 2.0 your Android device becomes vulnerable to malware of any type: IMO only those do it who do not care about the built-in protection.

Yes - this is covered on Android Source.

The basics:
Android Verified Boot ensures that the boot code is legitimate, by using a boot image "signature" compared to a signature stored in the key registry.

Dm-verity is a method by which the code on the block devices is hashed; this hash is then compared to a reference hash to determine its authenticity before the image is loaded, thereby preventing rootkits from declaring themselves legitimate.

Vbmeta verification is a method of storing those reference hashes to which the generated hashes are compared. This can be and often is used for any critical partition, such as /boot and /system.

These aren't new concepts and indeed have been integral to Android for some time. What is new is how the Android 12 AVB headers were handled.

We still don't know exactly where in the process the problem occurred when trying to run custom boot images with Android 12. I suspect that the issue wasn't custom software itself - after all, you could still flash a custom ROM and run it without issues - but rather, trying to use a modified boot image with otherwise stock Android 12 system. Don't take my word for it, though, because I don't know for sure.

It has nothing to do with the kernel itself. The anykernel.zip uses magiskboot to "repack" the kernel during the flashing kernel.
 
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roirraW "edor" ehT

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Regarding P6P 5G model numbers and capabilities:

There are three hardware versions:
  • G8VOU (AU, US); also listed as G8V0U - zero instead of "oh" on some sites, Google shows the former, G8VOU) - has mmWave 5G support
  • GF5KQ (JP) - has mmWave 5G support
  • GLUOG (CA, DE, FR, GB, IE, TW) - no mmWave 5G support
For instance, my factory unlocked direct from Google in the United States Pixel 6 Pro 512 GB is a G8VOU. As far as I know, all other variations in each individual phone are controlled by software (which firmware is loaded) and over the internet (which IMEIs are Carrier Unlocked or not, and OEM Unlockable or not).

Check carriers, their 5G networks & their 5G roaming support for Pixel phones. Make sure and choose your country from the drop-down to see the list of carriers beneath.

There's also the section above that Learn which Pixel phones can work with which kinds of 5G.
 
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roirraW "edor" ehT

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My personal advice for how to get your device back up and running like you had it previously after a factory reset:
  1. I use Nova Launcher Prime, so I do backups anytime I change my home screen or app drawer/tabs setup, so widgets and app icons and other Nova-specific configurations are easier to restore.
  2. Go to Android Settings and use Settings' search box for Backup. Make sure that your Google account is set up to backup your apps (and app data for the apps that developers have configured to use Google's Backup API). Make sure things are backed up. Note, this doesn't backup the apps themselves, only the list of apps, so only applies to apps installed from the Play Store. As I said in parentheses, developers have to choose to integrate Google's Backup API into their app, and those apps only will get their app data backed up into Google's cloud.
  3. If you're rooted also, then you could use something like Swift Backup to backup to the cloud. I do so, although I still restore as much as possible through Google's backup, and I only restore through Swift on a case-by-case basis, as needed when I discover an app that's tough to set back up doesn't have it's data restored by Google.
  4. If you've used Google Photos to backup your photos to Google's cloud, then hit the button in Google Photos to free up space. This will automatically and only delete your local copies of photos and videos that it's already backed up.
  5. Once that ^ is done, look at your internal storage with your favorite File Manger and see if there's anything left that you want to back up manually, since a factory reset will wipe everything. Copy them to your computer or a flash drive.
  6. When you're just starting the out of the box setup after the reset, when it asks you if you want to use a cable to restore things from an old phone, choose No, and that will lead you to Google's cloud backup where you can choose to restore everything, or you can select what you want to restore.
  7. I think you can figure out the rest.
 
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roirraW "edor" ehT

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If you have any reputable youtube links that you think might be of help as well for complete noobs like me, that would be great.
This one's kinda long for what it is, and this is for the Pixel 1, but it should be similar for the Pixel 6/Pro. I won't add it to the first post just yet in case there are differences, and I don't want to recommend something I can't actually try on the 6 Pro (since I won't get mine for likely another two days). Unlocking the Bootloader of the Pixel and Pixel XL

Good luck!
 
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dj24

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Samsung Galaxy Note 20 Ultra
This one's kinda long for what it is, and this is for the Pixel 1, but it should be similar for the Pixel 6/Pro. I won't add it to the first post just yet in case there are differences, and I don't want to recommend something I can't actually try on the 6 Pro (since I won't get mine for likely another two days). Unlocking the Bootloader of the Pixel and Pixel XL

Good luck!
This is great. I won't be getting mine for a while as well so please come back and update this thread.
 
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Pekempy

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Google Pixel 6 Pro
If you have any reputable youtube links that you think might be of help as well for complete noobs like me, that would be great.
Generally YouTube video guides for software related things aren't particularly helpful, as they can often get outdated very quickly; especially in the early days of a device as they can't be updated when new things are found out.
It would probably be best to carefully read through guides
 
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roirraW "edor" ehT

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roirraW "edor" ehT

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This is great. I won't be getting mine for a while as well so please come back and update this thread.
FYI, I'm reminded by several members in these forums that unlocking the bootloader (the first step before being able to root your Carrier-Unlocked Pixel 6 Pro) wipes the device - so does re-locking it. So I highly recommend unlocking it as the first step when you get the phone, otherwise, you'll have to back up anything that doesn't normally get backed up, and go through the initial setup process again. Not a big deal for some, but would likely not be optimal for a new user.
  • Instructions for Locking/Unlocking the Bootloader (note that unlocking or locking the bootloader will wipe the device every single time, so be sure to have your data backed up before doing so, or better yet, just unlock it as soon as you get the device).
 

Ghisy

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Mar 27, 2010
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FYI, I'm reminded by several members in these forums that unlocking the bootloader (the first step before being able to root your Carrier-Unlocked Pixel 6 Pro) wipes the device - so does re-locking it. So I highly recommend unlocking it as the first step when you get the phone
This! It's the first thing you should do out of the box if you plan on rooting later.
 

96carboard

Senior Member
Jul 17, 2018
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The unlock process works like this;

1) Take brand new fresh phone out of box. Do NOT put sim card in it, just power it on.
2) When it starts harassing you to join google, hit "skip" and "remind me tomorrow" as applicable until you reach home screen. YOU DO NOT need to plug in a google account.
3) Settings --> About --> Build number. Tap it until it says you're a developer.
4) Back --> Network --> Wifi and connect it.
5) Back --> System --> Developer --> OEM unlocking (check), USB debugging (check), plug in USB, authorize when requested.
6) # adb reboot-bootloader
7) # fastboot flashing unlock

Now that you've unlocked it, it has been wiped, so repeat 1-4, then disable all the google spyware, and go ahead and start using it while waiting for aosp and root.
 

96carboard

Senior Member
Jul 17, 2018
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Thanks. I was confused because I didn't see that mentioned in the OP

Steps 6 & 7 are new to me. -not something I did on my 6XL

Thanks again

ƒ

6 is just an easier way to reboot it into recovery than trying to shut it down and fiddle with volume+power buttons to start in the right mode. You had to do 7, no choice. Some older phones used "fastboot oem unlock". You'd have to ask google why they changed it.
 
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roirraW "edor" ehT

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The unlock process works like this;

1) Take brand new fresh phone out of box. Do NOT put sim card in it, just power it on.
2) When it starts harassing you to join google, hit "skip" and "remind me tomorrow" as applicable until you reach home screen. YOU DO NOT need to plug in a google account.
3) Settings --> About --> Build number. Tap it until it says you're a developer.
4) Back --> Network --> Wifi and connect it.
5) Back --> System --> Developer --> OEM unlocking (check), USB debugging (check), plug in USB, authorize when requested.
6) # adb reboot-bootloader
7) # fastboot flashing unlock

Now that you've unlocked it, it has been wiped, so repeat 1-4, then disable all the google spyware, and go ahead and start using it while waiting for aosp and root.

Thanks. I was confused because I didn't see that mentioned in the OP

Steps 6 & 7 are new to me. -not something I did on my 6XL

Thanks again

ƒ
Good point. I'll add to the OP. You might not remember 6 and 7, but you had to have done them one way or another, whether using a third-party tool to help automate that part or something else.
 
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biTToe

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6 is just an easier way to reboot it into recovery than trying to shut it down and fiddle with volume+power buttons to start in the right mode. You had to do 7, no choice. Some older phones used "fastboot oem unlock". You'd have to ask google why they changed it.
Ahhh...
to be fair, B/L unlock was a long time ago for me.
My P6P arrives tomorrow and I am hoping for root as well.
ƒ
 
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    Finally updated the OP with:
    How to flash both slots using the full factory image BOTH SLOTS at the same time
    I don't know why, but it could be because of this: https://blog.quarkslab.com/attacking-titan-m-with-only-one-byte.html

    The time frame lines up, antirollback commit was implemented in the days after Google told the researcher they are developing a fix.

    And it's pretty big, allowing the ex-filtration of the secret keys inside the Titan and doing arbitrary code execution right on the Titan, a complete permanent compromise of the device. This is probably why Google is trying to stop people from downgrading to Android 12. Understandable why this is the first time Google is doing this, someone can resell this permanently compromised device to anyone, or do this to someone's phone. It's too late though, any Tensor device not updated to Android 13 could be forever compromised, so really the security theater of Pixel devices has just been torn down. We'll see if the Pixel 7 or Titan M3 fares better. Previous Pixel phones do not implement these OTP bit checks inside their bootloaders so I believe they are never going to have to worry about being stopped from downgraded, although they are susceptible to compromise.

    The average person should never brick their phone from this, the GrapheneOS tester only had this happen because they were testing GrapheneOS on Android 13 and were capable of flashing a borked ROM.
    But yes if you're updating to Android 13 manually via fastboot just run

    1. fastboot --slot all flash bootloader bootloader.img
    2. fastboot --slot all flash radio radio.img
    3. Reboot the phone
    4. fastboot --skip-reboot update image.zip
    5. Select reboot to bootloader from inside fastbootd
    6. fastboot --set-active=other
    7. fastboot update image.zip
    8. If using Magisk then add a --skip-reboot to then boot back into the bootloader to flash your patched image.

    It's either/or, you can do one slot at a time or both slots. There's nothing wrong with either way. You *may* be safer at least flashing the bootloader to both slots at the same time, at least. I did one slot at a time with no problems. The first slot Monday, then the second slot Tuesday.
    4
    Did you try just flashing the patched image to 1 slot instead of both at the same time?
    I crossed my fingers, Knocked on wood, rubbed my lucky rabbits foot and fired up my computer
    - Booted the bootloader
    - Connected the computer and phone
    - Opened a command prompt
    - fastboot flash boot magisk_patched...img
    - Pressed the enter key
    - Took a deep breath, wiped the sweat from my forehead and pressed the pwr button on my phone.
    - After, a few seconds had passed, I noticed there was no smoke coming from it, I looked at the screen.
    - It had booted up and was rooted. :) :) :)
    - I put the Flash Tool on hold untill the next crisis.

    To all the XDA members and Staff that helped
    get my problem resolved. (y)(y)(y)

    Thank you!
    4
    I've been following the android 13 upgrade postings and I'm surprised not more people know this.
    If you add --force to fastboot update "fastboot --force update image-*" you can downgrade back to Android 12 as long as you wipe data.
    I tried this as soon as I upgraded to 13 and yes you can downgrade down to Android 12 after upgrading with no noticable issues. The radio and every other image but the bootloader can be downgraded. But I only tried 003, 004 July images for oriole so I don't know about anything lower personally.
    4
    For those who are wondering if we should or should not be worried, or how worried we should or should not be, here's a response from the Graphene dev who first tweeted about his colleague bricking his device due to the new ARB, for what it's worth...

    So yes, at the minimum flash the A13 bootloader to both slots. May even want to flash all of A13 to both slots since we still are not certain what the outcome would be if the device reverted to a slot with the A13 bootloader and A12 everything else, since to my knowledge no one has tested that yet (being on A13 and flashing back to A12 with the A13 bootloader).

    Follow up, again, for what it's worth...

  • 9
    I think this just means you won't be able to downgrade the bootloader itself. Don't take my word for it but I suspect that one could still run older versions on the new bootloader.

    To test this, just download the factory zip and update the bootloader only.
    You are correct.

    I did:

    Code:
    adb reboot bootloader
    fastboot flash bootloader bootloader-raven-slider-1.2-8739948.img
    fastboot reboot

    And I'm booted into Android 12 still just fine. Below is the command prompt output:
    S:\platform-tools>adb reboot bootloader
    * daemon not running; starting now at tcp:5037
    * daemon started successfully

    S:\platform-tools>fastboot flash bootloader bootloader-raven-slider-1.2-8739948.img
    Sending 'bootloader_b' (11554 KB) OKAY [ 0.047s]
    Writing 'bootloader_b' (bootloader) Flashing pack version slider-1.2-8739948
    (bootloader) flashing platform gs101
    (bootloader) Validating partition ufs
    (bootloader) Validating partition ufs
    (bootloader) Validating partition partition:0
    (bootloader) Validating partition partition:1
    (bootloader) Validating partition partition:2
    (bootloader) Validating partition partition:3
    (bootloader) Validating partition bl1_b
    (bootloader) Validating partition pbl_b
    (bootloader) Validating partition bl2_b
    (bootloader) Validating partition abl_b
    (bootloader) Validating partition bl31_b
    (bootloader) Validating partition tzsw_b
    (bootloader) Validating partition gsa_b
    (bootloader) Validating partition ldfw_b
    (bootloader) Flashing partition ufs
    (bootloader) Flashing partition ufs
    (bootloader) Flashing partition partition:0
    (bootloader) Flashing partition partition:1
    (bootloader) Flashing partition partition:2
    (bootloader) Flashing partition partition:3
    (bootloader) Flashing partition bl1_b
    (bootloader) Flashing partition pbl_b
    (bootloader) Flashing partition bl2_b
    (bootloader) Flashing partition abl_b
    (bootloader) Flashing partition bl31_b
    (bootloader) Flashing partition tzsw_b
    (bootloader) Flashing partition gsa_b
    (bootloader) Flashing partition ldfw_b
    (bootloader) Loading sideload ufsfwupdate
    OKAY [ 2.766s]
    Finished. Total time: 2.825s

    S:\platform-tools>fastboot reboot
    Rebooting OKAY [ 0.001s]
    Finished. Total time: 0.002s

    S:\platform-tools>

    Note to anyone, if after upgrading to 13 you want to downgrade to 12 using a full factory image's flash-all.bat, you'll at minimum have to either remove Android 12's bootloader flash line from the file, or replace it with fastboot flash bootloader bootloader-raven-slider-1.2-8739948.img (and have the right bootloader file in the same folder). Either should work fine.
    8
    Thanks for the detailed explanation. I wonder why this is the first time we are hearing of the e-fuse? It also makes one wonder why Google is taking such permanent measures, given their generally open attitude towards developers on Pixel/Nexus devices...like, who cares if someone was able to downgrade?

    As far as what it does and what it changes, it sounds like this is something we'll have to find out for ourselves unfortunately. But for the time being I would think it's safe to say that everyone updating should flash the A13 bootloader to both slots just to be safe in case of a alternate slot bootloop.
    I don't know why, but it could be because of this: https://blog.quarkslab.com/attacking-titan-m-with-only-one-byte.html

    The time frame lines up, antirollback commit was implemented in the days after Google told the researcher they are developing a fix.

    And it's pretty big, allowing the ex-filtration of the secret keys inside the Titan and doing arbitrary code execution right on the Titan, a complete permanent compromise of the device. This is probably why Google is trying to stop people from downgrading to Android 12. Understandable why this is the first time Google is doing this, someone can resell this permanently compromised device to anyone, or do this to someone's phone. It's too late though, any Tensor device not updated to Android 13 could be forever compromised, so really the security theater of Pixel devices has just been torn down. We'll see if the Pixel 7 or Titan M3 fares better. Previous Pixel phones do not implement these OTP bit checks inside their bootloaders so I believe they are never going to have to worry about being stopped from downgraded, although they are susceptible to compromise.

    The average person should never brick their phone from this, the GrapheneOS tester only had this happen because they were testing GrapheneOS on Android 13 and were capable of flashing a borked ROM.
    But yes if you're updating to Android 13 manually via fastboot just run

    1. fastboot --slot all flash bootloader bootloader.img
    2. fastboot --slot all flash radio radio.img
    3. fastboot reboot bootloader
    4. fastboot --slot all update image.zip
      1. If using Magisk then use fastboot --slot all --skip-reboot update image.zip and select reboot to bootloader in fastbootd once fastboot is done flashing to flash your patched Magisk boot image.
    If you are already on Android 13 then just perform steps 1-2-3.
    6
    I guess I'm splitting hairs then, because there's still no physical fuse that gets physically destroyed...but what you described has the same effect, permanently writing a 1.

    Question is, when exactly is blow_ar called? What does this change/how is it used? Does this simply mean the bootloader will reject older bootloader images, or that it will reject all images older than the bootloader date?
    There actually is a physical object being destroyed. Yes, there isn't a typical fuse being blown, as a typical fuse blows and opens the circuit. Instead what is implemented is an antifuse. These are the opposite of fuses ("anti") and are normally open. When enough voltage is passed they blow closed, and they actually do blow, they use oxide-breakdown cells that physically break down when the voltage threshold is met. This is more favorable for integrated circuits as blocking flow is a 0 and flowing is a 1. Old terminology hangs around and still refers to these as a fuse, from IBM's technology they named "eFuses" even though they perform opposite of a fuse. The modern terminology is to call them One-Time Programmable memory, or OTP memory. Modern processors have plenty of these. I don't know how many OTP bits are included on Tensor, but another ARM SoC the Rockchip RK3399 has 2 kibibits worth of OTP.

    You can read more about them in this PDF, page 31 chapter 6 section 3.

    There are OTP cells being blown, inside boot_control it is invoking a system monitor call with what I think are called contexts or secure applications, SMC_CM_OTP_CONTROL (0xC2001014UL).
    OTP_CONTROL being One-Time Programmable Control.
    The other things being passed are CMD_W_ANTIRBK_NS_AP (0x7UL) and CMD_W_ANTIRBK_S_AP (0x9UL), which are the bits (7 and 9) being blown. I can only infer that the NS and S are for the normal world (NS) and secure world (S).

    As for when /sys/kernel/boot_control/blow_ar is being blown, it is blown inside BootControl::markBootSuccessful, which is what is setting both the fuse and writing to devinfo that the slot had booted successfully. I don't know when exactly a boot is successful, but it is being ran by a service after Android boots up enough to be considered a success.

    What does it change and how does the bootloader use this? Well, we'll never know. We're not privileged enough to know this. The source code for the many (there's something like four) bootloaders are kept closed source. Anything below the kernel and device tree we just don't know. Given that there is a bricked Pixel 6 out there due to the bits being blown on A13 and the slot switched back to A12, it isn't just the Android bootloader checking this, it's below that in either the BL1 or BL2 boot firmware. This I assume lines up with the bits being blown for normal world and secure world, as BL1 operates in the secure world while the Android bootloader operates in the normal world.

    What can we do about this? Really, nothing.
    6
    Android 13 looks to be OUT!

    13.0.0 (TP1A.220624.021, Aug 2022)FlashLinkd8ddfdca3af0b97b3b99460afdab3cf95a741f988dccd5122564c855a64baa36
    6
    Woah! Not August but two new July images here. (not saying that @spotmark isn't getting the August OTA)

    12.1.0 (SQ3A.220705.003.A3, Jul 2022, Verizon, Verizon MVNOs)FlashLink5651ee94a61222e2c03ca55b76f4aa452c5eed9e43ad8aabb7060739177e1689
    12.1.0 (SQ3A.220705.004.A1, Jul 2022, Softbank)FlashLink6b60f5a6401b35c635408494b54323825a8bcf5c85384a7cc2c241849a2d7413
  • 58
    Android 13 is OUT!

    My tiny, early, very mini-review of Android 13 is here.

    NOTE that if you use the full factory image to flash, to be safe, you'll want to flash to your current slot, change slots, and then flash again to the new slot.
    Thanks to @Lughnasadh for sharing the news about this, starting here.

    Also see here for the reason this was done:



    I've been following the android 13 upgrade postings and I'm surprised not more people know this.
    If you add --force to fastboot update "fastboot --force update image-*" you can downgrade back to Android 12 as long as you wipe data.
    I tried this as soon as I upgraded to 13 and yes you can downgrade down to Android 12 after upgrading with no noticable issues. The radio and every other image but the bootloader can be downgraded. But I only tried 003, 004 July images for oriole so I don't know about anything lower personally.

    How to flash both slots using the full factory image BOTH SLOTS at the same time:
    I don't know why, but it could be because of this: https://blog.quarkslab.com/attacking-titan-m-with-only-one-byte.html

    The time frame lines up, antirollback commit was implemented in the days after Google told the researcher they are developing a fix.

    And it's pretty big, allowing the ex-filtration of the secret keys inside the Titan and doing arbitrary code execution right on the Titan, a complete permanent compromise of the device. This is probably why Google is trying to stop people from downgrading to Android 12. Understandable why this is the first time Google is doing this, someone can resell this permanently compromised device to anyone, or do this to someone's phone. It's too late though, any Tensor device not updated to Android 13 could be forever compromised, so really the security theater of Pixel devices has just been torn down. We'll see if the Pixel 7 or Titan M3 fares better. Previous Pixel phones do not implement these OTP bit checks inside their bootloaders so I believe they are never going to have to worry about being stopped from downgraded, although they are susceptible to compromise.

    The average person should never brick their phone from this, the GrapheneOS tester only had this happen because they were testing GrapheneOS on Android 13 and were capable of flashing a borked ROM.
    But yes if you're updating to Android 13 manually via fastboot just run

    1. fastboot --slot all flash bootloader bootloader.img
    2. fastboot --slot all flash radio radio.img
    3. fastboot reboot bootloader
    4. fastboot --slot all update image.zip
      1. If using Magisk then use fastboot --slot all --skip-reboot update image.zip and select reboot to bootloader in fastbootd once fastboot is done flashing to flash your patched Magisk boot image.
    If you are already on Android 13 then just perform steps 1-2-3.

    How to flash both slots using the full factory image ONE SLOT at a time:
    I use the full Pixel 6 Pro Factory Image to update each month. Use the same official latest ADB/Fastboot (SDK Platform Tools) you normally use. Edit the flash-all.bat (if on Windows - if on something else, edit the appropriate flash-all script file) and remove the "-w" and re-save it. If you want to keep the flash-all.bat from rebooting automatically after the update so that you can change slots and flash again, add fastboot --skip-reboot in the flash-all.bat after the fastboot update image-raven-xyNz.YYMMDD.BBB.zip line. Thanks, @Homeboy76 and @Lughnasadh!

    Re-open the script file and confirm that you saved it with the "-w" removed, so it doesn't wipe your device.

    From running Android:
    Code:
    adb reboot bootloader
    (Let it reboot into Fastboot mode.  Make note of which active slot is listed on the Fastboot screen, third item from the bottom.)
    
    flash-all.bat
    (WITH "-w" removed.  Let it flash everything, will take several minutes.)
    
    Let it boot up (and check the notifications for the update process to finish while Android is running)
    
    adb reboot bootloader
    
    On the Fastboot screen, change to the opposite slot with either:
    
    fastboot --set-active=a
    (If you're on slot b)
    
    OR
    
    fastboot --set-active=b
    (If you're on slot a)
    
    OR
    
    [QUOTE="Homeboy76, post: 87298957, member: 4810220"]
    I think you may want to use
    [ICODE] fastboot --set-active=other[/ICODE]
    it lowers the mistake threshold.
    [/QUOTE]
    
    flash-all.bat
    (again)

    13.0.0 (TP1A.220624.021, Aug 2022)FlashLinkd8ddfdca3af0b97b3b99460afdab3cf95a741f988dccd5122564c855a64baa36

    Note that this is mainly for the officially listed "Unlocked" Pixel 6 Pro, available directly from the Google Store. All of this will also apply to any other (carrier-specific) variant of the Pixel 6 Pro which you can achieve an unlocked bootloader on. This includes T-Mobile and AT&T variants. It's likely Verizon variants will never be able to unlock their bootloader, or if so it will require paying the right person to do so.

    Feel free to ask about general questions, but for anything that's specific to your variant, you should use one of the other already existing threads. You'll find Verizon, AT&T, and T-Mobile-related threads in those respective search results.

    Here there be dragons. 🐉 I am not responsible for anything at all. 😹

    Unlocking or locking the bootloader will wipe the device every single time, so be sure to have your data backed up before doing so, or better yet, just unlock it as soon as you get the device.


    Keep in mind that unlocking the bootloader or rooting might affect your phone's capability to use banking apps such as Google Pay, your local bank's app, or even the ability to install some apps like NetFlix. See @Pekempy's thread Working SafetyNet with Pixel 6 Pro Android 12

    If you're going to re-lock the bootloader, make sure the ROM you have on your phone is completely stock (by flashing the latest official firmware) BEFORE re-locking it.

    There are no negative consequences if you unlock or re-lock the bootloader other than it will wipe your phone, and while unlocked you get a brief screen when you boot the phone telling you (and anyone who sees your phone at the time) that the bootloader is unlocked. You will also continue to receive updates (if you've merely unlocked the bootloader, you can take updates as normal) unlike Samsung, Sony, et cetera, which have permanent major consequences with reduced functionality even if you un-root and re-lock your bootloader. If you're actually rooted (not just bootloader unlocked), you'll have to perform extra steps to manually update each month, and to keep root/re-root.


    All posts about Google Pay or banking will be reported to be deleted. Please keep this thread on-topic. There are at least one or two other How To Guide threads in this section in which folks discuss how to get around banking app restrictions when you're rooted or just have an unlocked bootloader. See @Pekempy's thread Working SafetyNet with Pixel 6 Pro Android 12
    If users persist in discussing banking apps in this thread, I will have this thread locked and only update this first post when there is new and updated information regarding the subjects of the title of the thread: Unlocking the Pixel 6 Pro bootloader, rooting, and TWRP. See @Pekempy's thread Working SafetyNet with Pixel 6 Pro Android 12

    Honorable mention to @Jawomo's aodNotify - Notification Light / LED for Pixel 6 Pro! (XDA link) / Notification light / LED for Pixel - aodNotify (Play Store link), which in my opinion restores useful functionality missing in most phones these days. It also solves some subjective issues some folks have with AOD (Always On Display), and/or solves/works around the problem where AOD is required for the optical fingerprint reader to work without the screen being on.​


    Check warranty status - *may* reveal if a phone is refurbished, only if the phone was refurbished through Google - thanks to @Alekos for making me aware of the site.
    Official Google Pixel Update and Software Repair (reported as of January 23, 2022 to still not be updated for the Pixel 6/Pro yet)

    Google's Help Page for Find problem apps by rebooting to safe mode - this can be a lifesaver and keep you from having to do a restore to 100% complete stock or even from having to do a factory reset. This will deactivate all Magisk modules, and they'll remain deactivated even after you boot normally after briefly booting to safe mode. You can reenable the Magisk modules as you wish to try to narrow down the problem if it was caused by a Magisk module. This can even get things working again after a Magisk Module wasn't finished installing and potentially causing a bootloop.

    Official Google Pixel Install fingerprint calibration software (also available at the bottom of the Update and Software Repair page above) - I believe this is only helpful if you've replaced the screen
    Official Google Android Flash Tool (OEM Unlocking needs to be toggled on - you may not have to manually unlock the bootloader - the "site" will do that on its own)
    OEM unlocking in developer options needs to be toggled on. I don't "believe" you have to actually do the "fastboot flashing unlock" command.

    ADB/Fastboot, Windows Drivers, and unlocking the bootloader (thanks @sidhaarthm for confirming unlocking the bootloader works as intended, be sure to thank him in his post)
    • You'll need this if you're going to unlock the bootloader on your Pixel 6 Pro: SDK Platform Tools (download links for Windows, Mac, and Linux). Note that you can find links to download the tools elsewhere, but I wouldn't trust them - you never know if they've been modified. Even if the person providing the link didn't do anything intentionally, the tools could be modified without them being aware. Why take a chance of putting your phone security further at risk?
    • For Windows, get Google's drivers here Get the Google USB Driver (ADB will likely work while the phone is fully booted, but if you're like me, you'll need these drivers for after you "adb reboot-bootloader", to be able to use ADB and Fastboot.
    • Thanks to @96carboard for posting the details of unlocking the bootloader, be sure to thank him in his post. Unlocking or locking the bootloader will wipe the device every single time, so be sure to have your data backed up before doing so, or better yet, just unlock it as soon as you get the device. Keep in mind that unlocking the bootloader or rooting might affect your phone's capability to use banking apps such as Google Pay, or your local bank's app. If you're going to re-lock the bootloader, make sure the ROM you have on your phone is completely stock (by flashing the latest official firmware) BEFORE re-locking it. My experience on my Pixel 1 was that there were no negative consequences if you unlock or re-lock the bootloader other than it will wipe your phone, and while unlocked you get a brief screen when you boot the phone telling you (and anyone who sees your phone at the time) that the bootloader is unlocked. All of this should still be the case. You will also continue to receive updates. Unlike Samsung, Sony, et cetera, which have major consequences with reduced functionality even if you un-root and re-lock your bootloader. If you're actually rooted (not just bootloader unlocked), you'll have to perform extra steps to keep root/re-root.:


      The unlock process works like this:

      1) Take brand new fresh phone out of box. Do NOT put sim card in it, just power it on (you can put a SIM card if you want, you just don't have to).
      2) When it starts harassing you to join Google, hit "skip" and "remind me tomorrow" as applicable until you reach home screen. YOU DO NOT need to plug in a google account.
      3) Settings --> About --> Build number. Repeatedly tap it until it says you're a developer.
      4) Back --> Network --> WiFi and connect it.
      5) Back --> System --> Developer --> OEM unlocking (check), USB debugging (check), plug in USB, authorize on the phone when requested.

      Using the Platform Tools previously mentioned in command line/terminal:
      6) #
      Code:
      adb reboot-bootloader
      7) #
      Code:
      fastboot flashing unlock

      Now that you've unlocked it, it has been wiped, so repeat 1-4, then disable all the google spyware, and go ahead and start using it while waiting for aosp and root.

      Official Instructions for Locking/Unlocking the Bootloader
    Personally, I would always use the official drivers Google provides unless they just don't work for whatever reason: Get the Google USB Driver (this is for Windows). They work for me. They are rarely updated, but they are every once in a great while, sometimes years in-between.
    I agree with this. be careful using drivers or adb/fastboot tools. Some are fine, but there's no need for it really anymore. Google has made it very easy to install drivers and Platform-Tools (adb/fastboot tool).

    Google provides the Fastboot/ADB tool (Platform-Tools) and Google USB Drivers (adb/fastboot interface). This will allow any Pixel to interface with Windows using the fastboot/adb protocol. Official Google USB Driver includes support for both the Fastboot and ADB driver interface. There are 3 main drivers (Fastboot, ADB and MTP/Portable File Transfer). The MTP/Portable File Transfer driver is built-in to Windows 7-11.

    Fastboot/ADB Driver Interface - Official Download Link:
    When flashing a full image or unlocking your bootloader, the fastboot interface is being used.

    First Download official Google USB Drivers (it's a zip file). Extract the zip (important!). Right-click on the android_winusb.inf file and hit install. You can then restart your phone to the Bootloader Screen (hold vol-down while it restarts or turns on). When you plug in your phone, Windows Device Manager will show a new device at the top: Android Device: Android Bootloader Interface.

    Using the ADB interface: It's the same driver. Enable USB Debugging on your phone, then plug it in to your computer. A prompt will appear on your phone (to allow USB Debugging). The driver in Device Manager will appear as Android Device: Android Composite ADB interface.

    Now you can download and use Platform-Tools to flash an Android Image, OTA or run adb/fastboot commands.
    Official Download Page
    "Android SDK Platform-Tools is a component for the Android SDK. It includes tools that interface with the Android platform, such as adb, fastboot, and systrace"

    It's best to make Platform-Tools available system-wide. Download Platform-Tools from the above link and extract it to your C:\ drive - that way you will have a folder to add to the PATH Environment under Window System Properties Menu, Advanced, Environment Variables, System Variables, PATH (google how to do this, very easy). What this does is allow adb/fastboot commands to be run from anywhere in the system, so you don't have to be in the platform-tools folder to run adb/fastboot commands and flash an Android Image (Official or Android Fork such as ProtonAOSP).

    Rooting-related


    No longer applies - Things that make rooting more complicated on Android 12
    @V0latyle posted a new thread with some very important and fascinating information about the increased difficulty to root Android 12: Read this before rooting. Be sure to thank him there.

    A list of the other important guides - be sure to thank the respective OPs
    For all relevant guide threads just click the yellow "How To Guide" quick filter above the list of threads in the Pixel 6 Pro section.


    TWRP (not made for the Pixel 6 Pro yet - will update when it has)
    I would guess that this should be the appropriate URL for official TWRP custom recovery for the Pixel 6 Pro, but who knows when/if that will actually be made available, and it may become available unofficially in these forum sections before being made official. I'll adjust this URL as needed. https://twrp.me/google/googlepixel6pro.html.

    Custom kernels for stock ROM(s)

    Factory Images (requires an unlocked bootloader)
    It's also handy to have to the full official firmware available, whether it's to recovery from accidents or for actual development. Note the official link to the general Factory Images for Nexus and Pixel Devices page. The following link goes directly to the Pixel 6 Pro (Raven) section: Pixel 6 Pro Factory Images. I prefer to actually bookmark a link to the device listed immediately below the device I want the firmware for, because Google dumbly (in my opinion) puts the latest firmware at the bottom of the list for each particular device, and that ends up making you scroll a lot after a year or two of monthly updates.

    Note: You can still get the December 2021 Factory Images and OTA from this thread, if you need them for any reason: Alternate links to December - all full factory images and OTAs available

    Full OTA Images (doesn't require an unlocked bootloader)

    The usefulness of having Verity and Verification enabled (now that it's not needed for root) - post #2 below.

    Regarding P6P 5G model numbers and capabilities - post #3 below.

    List of all Pixel monthly security bulletins and Play System Updates - post #4 below.

    How I root and update (which is identical whether rooting the first time or updating):
    • Use the latest Magisk Stable (in my case, I keep the app "hidden" / renamed)
    • Used the full firmware zip, extracted to the same folder as the latest Platform Tools (S:\platform-tools)
    • Extracted the new boot.img
    • Copied new boot.img to the phone
    • Patched the new boot.img with Magisk Stable
    • Renamed Magisk'd boot.img so I know what version of firmware it's for
    • Copied the Magisk'd boot.img back to the computer
    • Disabled all my Magisk Modules
    • Removed the "-w " from the flash-all.bat
    • Re-edited the flash-all.bat to verify I saved it with the "-w " taken out
    • Open a Command Prompt, navigated to S:\platform-tools
    • adb reboot bootloader
    • flash-all.bat
    • Let phone boot, unlock it, check that it's working, allow the update process to finish (gave it five minutes or so)
    • adb reboot bootloader
    • fastboot flash boot kernel.img (renamed Magisk'd boot.img)
    • fastboot reboot
    • Unlock, check everything's working
    • Re-enabled the most basic Magisk Modules which I was sure wouldn't cause a critical issue
    • Reboot, unlock, made sure everything's working
    Back to modding!

    I may append these first four posts with further useful information or links as needed.
    15
    The unlock process works like this;

    1) Take brand new fresh phone out of box. Do NOT put sim card in it, just power it on.
    2) When it starts harassing you to join google, hit "skip" and "remind me tomorrow" as applicable until you reach home screen. YOU DO NOT need to plug in a google account.
    3) Settings --> About --> Build number. Tap it until it says you're a developer.
    4) Back --> Network --> Wifi and connect it.
    5) Back --> System --> Developer --> OEM unlocking (check), USB debugging (check), plug in USB, authorize when requested.
    6) # adb reboot-bootloader
    7) # fastboot flashing unlock

    Now that you've unlocked it, it has been wiped, so repeat 1-4, then disable all the google spyware, and go ahead and start using it while waiting for aosp and root.
    15
    SDK Platform Tools updated to v33.0.1 (March 2022):

    33.0.1 (March 2022)​

    • adb
      • Fixes Windows mdns crashes.
      • Fixes enable-verity/disable-verity on old devices.
      • Fixes "install multiple" on old devices
      • Improves the help output to include all supported compression methods.
    13
    Just to let everyone know, updating to .037 and re-rooting (without wiping anything) worked with no problems. My method is to just replace -w with --disable-verity --disable-verification in the flash-all.bat file and run the flash-all command. I then let it reboot, patch the boot image, return to bootloader and flash the patched boot image.

    Canary 23014

    EDIT: Thank you @ipdev for confirming my inquiry that this method would work back on Nov. 4 👍
    11
    SDK Platform Tools have been updated to v32.0.0 (January 2022). Update now before you forget and flashing the February update on the 7th gives you hassles. :)

    Direct download for Windows: https://dl.google.com/android/repository/platform-tools-latest-windows.zip

    Revisions​

    32.0.0 (January 2022)​

    • adb
      • Fixed adb w/o args SEGV regression.
    • fastboot
      • Reinstated recovery execution from b/158156979 (removal of preprocessor guards for root/secure).