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arter97 kernel for OnePlus 3 running CyanogenMod 13

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arter97

Recognized Developer
Oct 14, 2012
3,781
33,941
23
Seoul
arter97.png


arter97 kernel for OnePlus 3 running CyanogenMod

/* Details */

Latest Linaro LSK kernel fully merged
Adaptive LMK disabled
Built with latest Linaro GCC toolchain with latest Linux H.G linker
Built with O2 speed optimizations
Power-efficient workqueues enabled
Random driver backported from mainline Linux(12 times faster)
Westwood as default TCP network congestion control
Entropy hook on storage removed
Default file-system mount option with noatime
CFQ I/O scheduler as default(it's the fastest I/O scheduler available on 3.18 kernel)
NVIDIA's power-efficiency improvement commits applied
sdcardfs from Galaxy S7 ported(stable)
Supports f2fs-formatted system partition

/* Disclaimer */

Your warranty is now void.
I am not responsible for bricked devices, dead SD cards,
thermonuclear war, or you getting fired because the alarm app failed. Please
do some research if you have any concerns about features included in this kernel
before flashing it! YOU are choosing to make these modifications, and if
you point the finger at me for messing up your device, I will laugh at you. Hard. A lot.

/* Warning */

Redistribution, modifying files used within this project's file or integrating with other projects are prohibited with no exceptions other than my projects.
Making mirrors, re-uploading to another servers are also prohibited with no exceptions.

/* Thanks to */

xboxfanj
TheCrazyLex
Thecrazyskull

/* Contact */

Twitter : @arter97

/* Notice */

This kernel will be updated accordingly to my new CyanogenMod 13 build, if it requires newly updated kernel
Support for other ROMs are not guaranteed and is not planned at the moment
To remove the kernel, wipe system partition and re-install the ROM
Disabling encryption(FDE) is highly recommended for better performance

/* Downloads and links */

arter97.com

XDA:DevDB Information
arter97 kernel for OnePlus 3, Kernel for the OnePlus 3

Contributors
arter97
Source Code: https://bitbucket.org/arter97/android_kernel_oneplus_msm8996

Kernel Special Features:

Version Information
Status: Nightly

Created 2016-08-14
Last Updated 2016-12-20
 

arter97

Recognized Developer
Oct 14, 2012
3,781
33,941
23
Seoul
/* To kang or not to kang */

I prefer "open" to all stuffs, explicitly except for my personal kernels.

I've once used to use private Git repository for my kernels and just release the source-codes as a tarball,
which means that other developers who are interested in my kernel's changes would not get the specific changes they want while not violating XDA forum rules or GPL.

That was almost 3 years ago which by then, I was a newbie developer on XDA.
I was afraid other big developers merging all of my changes and I'll get buried down.
However, I've changed my mind and opened up my Git access to everyone after thinking my previous actions did not belongs to XDA's spirit.
That was a big move for myself of re-thinking what should be open.

Later down on the road as I gained more development skills, I've contributed into CyanogenMod and other's custom kernel and ROMs for fixing stuffs, introducing new concepts or improving performance.
During such process, there were quite a lot of occurrences where I was actually the first one to do those things.
For those who're familiar with "temasek ROM", you may know that after I became a contributor, temasek rose even more into the center of other AOSP ROMs' attention, as I was the first to introduce new exciting stuffs such as compiler changes or f2fs. And I quickly gained dozens of followers on my GitHub account.
And eventually, people *kang*ed my changes. Sometimes invalidating my authorship.
It surely is not a right thing to do, but I let it slide as it didn't matter that much. I believed that if my changes are good enough, it'd be better to end up with a larger user base rather than being a **** trying to hunt down every ROM developers who're doing it wrong.


Same story goes to my ROMs.

My real first popular ROM was back-to-n00t, which is a ported ROM from Galaxy S3 LTE to provide stable Touchwiz KitKat experience to the Galaxy S3 3G users.
I opened up everything to GitHub. And I even encouraged that other ROM developers to use my ROM as a base to work on their own ROM as I knew there are a lot of Touchwiz ROM cookers who're way better than me on modifying SystemUI or frameworks(via smali) BUT aren't too good on porting ROMs. I hoped that my ports can be a great base for others to work on their own modifications.
Now those spirits repeated on the Galaxy S6, I opened up everything about back-to-n0t3.


However, I do not do or believe those same things with the kernels.
There are far less kernel developers on XDA compared to ROM developers. ROMs are much more appealing for an "Android newbie" to go tweak. You can modify UI, enable some hidden settings and even port features from another devices.
So when ROMs gets copied off, users can easily distinguish if that was stolen or not.
Let’s say a well-known developer A ported S6 designs and features to the S4. Next day, less-known developer B uploads a ROM on XDA that claims to do the same thing. First thing that comes to the users’ mind would be ‘Is that guy a thief?’.
However, same thing cannot be said on the kernels as they work on a much lower level. You can’t distinguish individual custom kernels just by staring at your phone.
If a ROM developer choose to go use other’s custom kernel and integrate it into their ROM, it’s most likely that users won’t appreciate that custom kernel developer whose work powers that ROM. Let’s face it, not all users care about “Thanks to”, “Credits” sections, and let me tell you, those are the majority. Now some custom kernel developers might be OK with that. However, I’m not. Unlike most developers on XDA, I got fascinated to Android because it runs on Linux kernel. Modifying Linux kernel was the first thing I’ve done on my Android device, not modifying ROM. And I spent years and years on gaining information on Linux/Android kernels and tweaking, coding myself. While I don’t necessarily care users choosing to NOT use my kernel, I cannot stand that my kernel would be installed on one’s device which its owner don’t even know which kernel, which developer who made that kernel is. That is why I’m against with the idea of integrating custom kernels into custom ROMs. If you want your users to have a custom kernel, let them learn themselves what that kernel really is, what does it offers, and who developed it. “For the ease of flashing/installation” is not an excuse for me. Take yourself a few more minutes to download a kernel from the web, and a few more seconds to flash a secondary ZIP file from the recovery. Is that hard? Time-consuming? Absolutely not.

I hope everyone gets the idea why I'm sticking with the idea of "don't integrate my kernel into others".

Cheers.
 

arter97

Recognized Developer
Oct 14, 2012
3,781
33,941
23
Seoul
/* Changelog */

2.0
Power saving patches from Pixel and AOSPA kernel
LA.HB.1.3.2-33900-8x96.0 CAF tag merged
Display on/off latency reduced (by TheCrazyLex)
Kernel now built with Cortex-A57 optimization (by TheCrazyLex)
Performance regression from power-efficient workqueue fixed (by TheCrazyLex)
Workqueue adjustments from francisfranco kernel
Wi-Fi drivers updated to LA.UM.5.5.r1-02200-8x96.0
f2fs merged from Linux 4.10 with the deadlock fix

1.9.1
Minor improvement for touch latency
Disable haptics for voice calls and video recordings (by sultan)
Wi-Fi power management tweaked
- Previous relaxation reverted as the stability issue seemed to be somewhere else

1.9
UI lags introduced with version 1.6 fixed
Wi-Fi power management relaxed to improve stability
Added Wi-Fi firmware from Pixel XL to improve stability

1.8
Touchscreen drivers updated from OnePlus 3T sources (lower latency)
Tri state key inconsistency fixed (by sultan)

1.7
Wi-Fi drivers updated
Wi-Fi BET tuned(TheCrazyLex)
Latest CyanogenMod 13 sources merged

1.6
Wi-Fi drivers updated
Wi-Fi configuration revamped to improve performance and stability
CPUSETS disabled to improve latency

1.5
ARM64 erratum fixes disabled to improve performance
Updated to Linux 3.18.43
Dozens of Google Pixel kernel commits merged to improve performance, smoothness and latency
CFQ upstreamed to Linux 4.9
BFQ disabled
Dirty COW vulnerability fixed

1.4
ADB issue on app installation fixed
Wi-Fi drivers reworked from CAF Android N sources

1.3
ro.adb.secure, ro.secure now set to 1
ADB rebuilt from Android N sources
Trigger TRIM on boot

1.2
Automatic TRIM(discard) now enabled
Many sultan's improvements merged
Switched to FSF GCC 6.2

1.1
GPU will now enter 133 MHz
 
Last edited:

xNAPx

Senior Member
Sep 26, 2010
1,246
223
Can I flash this kernel over EX Kernel?

Sent from my ONEPLUS A3003 using Tapatalk
 

striked0wn

Senior Member
Feb 22, 2013
334
128
Hey arter nice to see you here, remember you from old s3 days :) i'm looking forward to a great time with my op3 [emoji106]

Gesendet von meinem ONEPLUS A3003 mit Tapatalk
 

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  • 69
    arter97.png


    arter97 kernel for OnePlus 3 running CyanogenMod

    /* Details */

    Latest Linaro LSK kernel fully merged
    Adaptive LMK disabled
    Built with latest Linaro GCC toolchain with latest Linux H.G linker
    Built with O2 speed optimizations
    Power-efficient workqueues enabled
    Random driver backported from mainline Linux(12 times faster)
    Westwood as default TCP network congestion control
    Entropy hook on storage removed
    Default file-system mount option with noatime
    CFQ I/O scheduler as default(it's the fastest I/O scheduler available on 3.18 kernel)
    NVIDIA's power-efficiency improvement commits applied
    sdcardfs from Galaxy S7 ported(stable)
    Supports f2fs-formatted system partition

    /* Disclaimer */

    Your warranty is now void.
    I am not responsible for bricked devices, dead SD cards,
    thermonuclear war, or you getting fired because the alarm app failed. Please
    do some research if you have any concerns about features included in this kernel
    before flashing it! YOU are choosing to make these modifications, and if
    you point the finger at me for messing up your device, I will laugh at you. Hard. A lot.

    /* Warning */

    Redistribution, modifying files used within this project's file or integrating with other projects are prohibited with no exceptions other than my projects.
    Making mirrors, re-uploading to another servers are also prohibited with no exceptions.

    /* Thanks to */

    xboxfanj
    TheCrazyLex
    Thecrazyskull

    /* Contact */

    Twitter : @arter97

    /* Notice */

    This kernel will be updated accordingly to my new CyanogenMod 13 build, if it requires newly updated kernel
    Support for other ROMs are not guaranteed and is not planned at the moment
    To remove the kernel, wipe system partition and re-install the ROM
    Disabling encryption(FDE) is highly recommended for better performance

    /* Downloads and links */

    arter97.com

    XDA:DevDB Information
    arter97 kernel for OnePlus 3, Kernel for the OnePlus 3

    Contributors
    arter97
    Source Code: https://bitbucket.org/arter97/android_kernel_oneplus_msm8996

    Kernel Special Features:

    Version Information
    Status: Nightly

    Created 2016-08-14
    Last Updated 2016-12-20
    57
    /* To kang or not to kang */

    I prefer "open" to all stuffs, explicitly except for my personal kernels.

    I've once used to use private Git repository for my kernels and just release the source-codes as a tarball,
    which means that other developers who are interested in my kernel's changes would not get the specific changes they want while not violating XDA forum rules or GPL.

    That was almost 3 years ago which by then, I was a newbie developer on XDA.
    I was afraid other big developers merging all of my changes and I'll get buried down.
    However, I've changed my mind and opened up my Git access to everyone after thinking my previous actions did not belongs to XDA's spirit.
    That was a big move for myself of re-thinking what should be open.

    Later down on the road as I gained more development skills, I've contributed into CyanogenMod and other's custom kernel and ROMs for fixing stuffs, introducing new concepts or improving performance.
    During such process, there were quite a lot of occurrences where I was actually the first one to do those things.
    For those who're familiar with "temasek ROM", you may know that after I became a contributor, temasek rose even more into the center of other AOSP ROMs' attention, as I was the first to introduce new exciting stuffs such as compiler changes or f2fs. And I quickly gained dozens of followers on my GitHub account.
    And eventually, people *kang*ed my changes. Sometimes invalidating my authorship.
    It surely is not a right thing to do, but I let it slide as it didn't matter that much. I believed that if my changes are good enough, it'd be better to end up with a larger user base rather than being a **** trying to hunt down every ROM developers who're doing it wrong.


    Same story goes to my ROMs.

    My real first popular ROM was back-to-n00t, which is a ported ROM from Galaxy S3 LTE to provide stable Touchwiz KitKat experience to the Galaxy S3 3G users.
    I opened up everything to GitHub. And I even encouraged that other ROM developers to use my ROM as a base to work on their own ROM as I knew there are a lot of Touchwiz ROM cookers who're way better than me on modifying SystemUI or frameworks(via smali) BUT aren't too good on porting ROMs. I hoped that my ports can be a great base for others to work on their own modifications.
    Now those spirits repeated on the Galaxy S6, I opened up everything about back-to-n0t3.


    However, I do not do or believe those same things with the kernels.
    There are far less kernel developers on XDA compared to ROM developers. ROMs are much more appealing for an "Android newbie" to go tweak. You can modify UI, enable some hidden settings and even port features from another devices.
    So when ROMs gets copied off, users can easily distinguish if that was stolen or not.
    Let’s say a well-known developer A ported S6 designs and features to the S4. Next day, less-known developer B uploads a ROM on XDA that claims to do the same thing. First thing that comes to the users’ mind would be ‘Is that guy a thief?’.
    However, same thing cannot be said on the kernels as they work on a much lower level. You can’t distinguish individual custom kernels just by staring at your phone.
    If a ROM developer choose to go use other’s custom kernel and integrate it into their ROM, it’s most likely that users won’t appreciate that custom kernel developer whose work powers that ROM. Let’s face it, not all users care about “Thanks to”, “Credits” sections, and let me tell you, those are the majority. Now some custom kernel developers might be OK with that. However, I’m not. Unlike most developers on XDA, I got fascinated to Android because it runs on Linux kernel. Modifying Linux kernel was the first thing I’ve done on my Android device, not modifying ROM. And I spent years and years on gaining information on Linux/Android kernels and tweaking, coding myself. While I don’t necessarily care users choosing to NOT use my kernel, I cannot stand that my kernel would be installed on one’s device which its owner don’t even know which kernel, which developer who made that kernel is. That is why I’m against with the idea of integrating custom kernels into custom ROMs. If you want your users to have a custom kernel, let them learn themselves what that kernel really is, what does it offers, and who developed it. “For the ease of flashing/installation” is not an excuse for me. Take yourself a few more minutes to download a kernel from the web, and a few more seconds to flash a secondary ZIP file from the recovery. Is that hard? Time-consuming? Absolutely not.

    I hope everyone gets the idea why I'm sticking with the idea of "don't integrate my kernel into others".

    Cheers.
    28
    New kernel is up.

    2.0
    Power saving patches from Pixel and AOSPA kernel
    LA.HB.1.3.2-33900-8x96.0 CAF tag merged
    Display on/off latency reduced (by TheCrazyLex)
    Kernel now built with Cortex-A57 optimization (by TheCrazyLex)
    Performance regression from power-efficient workqueue fixed (by TheCrazyLex)
    Workqueue adjustments from francisfranco kernel
    Wi-Fi drivers updated to LA.UM.5.5.r1-02200-8x96.0
    f2fs merged from Linux 4.10 with the deadlock fix
    27
    New kernel build

    1.8
    Touchscreen drivers updated from OnePlus 3T sources (lower latency)
    Tri state key inconsistency fixed (by sultan)
    26
    New build.

    1.5
    ARM64 erratum fixes disabled to improve performance
    Updated to Linux 3.18.43
    Dozens of Google Pixel kernel commits merged to improve performance, smoothness and latency
    CFQ upstreamed to Linux 4.9
    BFQ disabled
    Dirty COW vulnerability fixed