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General Best Charger 25W PPS - FOUND IT

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ibrahim52

Senior Member
Jul 17, 2012
98
16
Smart Watches
The day 1 when I charged my google pixel 6, I had my heart stopped because while going to sleep I connected the charger and when I woke up the battery went down from 44% to 33% showing "connected, not charging" I thought this is it.



But then through out the whole day I was going through tonnes of videos and posts which confirmed one thing for sure that Google Pixel 6 doesn't go more than 22W on PPS charger. Finally fingers crossed I was going to spend on Anker 65W but then came across Belkin 25W Boost Wall Charger with PPS. My goodness the charger does what it does, charges 50% in 30 minutes and remaining reaching slowly in another 45 minutes which is enough and sounds safe to me.



I am posting this because many look around the internet for solutions like me, if I can contribute a little.

 

Velcorn

Senior Member
Jul 9, 2015
164
48
Hamburg
It's very ironic. I was initially going to buy the official Google charger for the 30W despite already having a 20W one. I just bought another 20W charger in the Anker Nano one which also serves me perfectly fine as 20W is good enough; don't need the extra 2-3W ^^
 

utnick

Senior Member
Nov 8, 2009
339
158
Texas
Received the charger and it is as advertised. It peaked at around 25W and then settled at around 22.5W. Something to note is that the longer Anker cable I used to use drops it down to around 8.7W so the cable matters a lot.


PXL_20211124_194223349.MP.png
 
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eloko

Senior Member
Nov 22, 2010
291
59
I found a charger, more like power supply, that it gives constant 3a

Xfinity EPS-10

not sure if it will damage the battery though, I tried once and it charged it pretty fast... Someone can input something about this?
 

utnick

Senior Member
Nov 8, 2009
339
158
Texas
I found a charger, more like power supply, that it gives constant 3a

Xfinity EPS-10

not sure if it will damage the battery though, I tried once and it charged it pretty fast... Someone can input something about this?
Did it charge at the same rate all the way to 100%?
 

eloko

Senior Member
Nov 22, 2010
291
59
Did it charge at the same rate all the way to 100%?
It did. 2900+ ma constant.

It's a power supply for a xfinity box. They are not even expensive, like 15 bucks.

I was reading about chargers and power supply which the power supply is always the same but chargers have temperature sensors? Maybe was about something else....

I may be mistaken
 

LLStarks

Senior Member
Jun 1, 2012
1,691
703
I found a charger, more like power supply, that it gives constant 3a

Xfinity EPS-10

not sure if it will damage the battery though, I tried once and it charged it pretty fast... Someone can input something about this?
Constant 3A means nothing. You're maxing out at 15W since it's not PPS. Higher current is not a good indicator.

Testing random power bricks is pointless unless you know it supports PPS.

A PPS charger can fluctuate between 1-4 amps and have a constantly adjusting voltage to maximize power output.
 
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LLStarks

Senior Member
Jun 1, 2012
1,691
703
Do not trust Franco readings. Get an inline meter if you need absolute certainty.

You could very well be hitting those speeds since the charger looks to be compatible.
 

eloko

Senior Member
Nov 22, 2010
291
59
Constant 3A means nothing. You're maxing out at 15W since it's not PPS. Higher current is not a good indicator.

Testing random power bricks is pointless unless you know it supports PPS.

A PPS charger can fluctuate between 1-4 amps and have a constantly adjusting voltage to maximize power output.
Understood.

Still, it got from 0 to 65% in like 40 minutes then I disconnected because I had to leave.. As soon as I receive mine, I'll do some stats and post them here.

I thought PPS chargers have a 3a max and is not constant, it goes up and down, depending on the battery itself.

The more amps that pulls, the faster it charges... Or am I wrong?
 

LLStarks

Senior Member
Jun 1, 2012
1,691
703
It's not correct. Power is current multiplied by voltage.

3A at 1V is only 3W. PD is usually 5V or 9V.

Google's can do 1.5A at 20V to reach 30W for supported devices.
 
Last edited:

eloko

Senior Member
Nov 22, 2010
291
59
For me, the more amps that pull the faster it charges... Voltage don't mean anything.
 

neptun2

Senior Member
Jul 25, 2009
401
163
Voltage have great effect. Power is electrical current (amperes) multiplied by voltage (volts). For example 1 ampere at 5 volts is just 5 watts but same 1 ampere at 20 volts is 20 watts which is much higher. Different charging technologies have different approaches to send maximum power from charger to the phone but generally most use higher voltage to transfer power above 10 W because most usb cables do not support more than 2 to 3 A of current. Before charging the battery itself phone converts back the high voltage to low voltage suitable for the battery (usually between 3.5 and 4 volts). If you are looking at software programs like aida 64 or ampere - they read the current at this stage so this is why more current at that level means faster charging because the voltage is already reduced to what is needed by the battery. Generally you have something like this:

1. Phone and charger negotiate needed power and they way it will be achieved based on the capabilities of the charger, phone and cable connecting them. Let's say that they agree for 20W which is 10 V with 2 A current.
2. Charger transforms 220 V AC to 10 V DC and phone starts drawing 2A of power.
3. Internally in the phone voltage is transformed from 10 V to 4 V which causes current to rise to 5 A which are fed to the battery.

Here is a great analogy showing the relation between voltage, current, power and resistance using something as simple as water hose.

 

Kramer679

Member
Jan 31, 2017
9
1
Received the charger and it is as advertised. It peaked at around 25W and then settled at around 22.5W. Something to note is that the longer Anker cable I used to use drops it down to around 8.7W so the cable matters a lot.


View attachment 5466909
My 10ft type c to type c cable doesn't charge any slower than the supplied cable. However it is worth noting that anyone using a type a to type c will be limited to 15w.
 
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  • 1
    Im using Samsung 25W PD PPS charger. Gets the job done.Grabbed it for INR 1150 ~ 14 USD.
    1
    Im using Samsung 25W PD PPS charger. Gets the job done.Grabbed it for INR 1150 ~ 14 USD.
    I also picked up a couple for £11-12 from the UK site last year. Full PPS support should help keep the battery healthy.

    I also purchased the multiport Ugreen 65W GaN Charger Quick Charge 4.0 3.0 Type C PD USB from AliExpress for around £22 and that also charge at an average of 3A.. and has PPS and PD support etc.
    I tend to use the Ugreen GaN most days as we have a family charging area in the house with 4 cables attached to it - to minimise number of charges being left plugged in.
  • 4
    Voltage have great effect. Power is electrical current (amperes) multiplied by voltage (volts). For example 1 ampere at 5 volts is just 5 watts but same 1 ampere at 20 volts is 20 watts which is much higher. Different charging technologies have different approaches to send maximum power from charger to the phone but generally most use higher voltage to transfer power above 10 W because most usb cables do not support more than 2 to 3 A of current. Before charging the battery itself phone converts back the high voltage to low voltage suitable for the battery (usually between 3.5 and 4 volts). If you are looking at software programs like aida 64 or ampere - they read the current at this stage so this is why more current at that level means faster charging because the voltage is already reduced to what is needed by the battery. Generally you have something like this:

    1. Phone and charger negotiate needed power and they way it will be achieved based on the capabilities of the charger, phone and cable connecting them. Let's say that they agree for 20W which is 10 V with 2 A current.
    2. Charger transforms 220 V AC to 10 V DC and phone starts drawing 2A of power.
    3. Internally in the phone voltage is transformed from 10 V to 4 V which causes current to rise to 5 A which are fed to the battery.

    Here is a great analogy showing the relation between voltage, current, power and resistance using something as simple as water hose.

    3
    The day 1 when I charged my google pixel 6, I had my heart stopped because while going to sleep I connected the charger and when I woke up the battery went down from 44% to 33% showing "connected, not charging" I thought this is it.



    But then through out the whole day I was going through tonnes of videos and posts which confirmed one thing for sure that Google Pixel 6 doesn't go more than 22W on PPS charger. Finally fingers crossed I was going to spend on Anker 65W but then came across Belkin 25W Boost Wall Charger with PPS. My goodness the charger does what it does, charges 50% in 30 minutes and remaining reaching slowly in another 45 minutes which is enough and sounds safe to me.



    I am posting this because many look around the internet for solutions like me, if I can contribute a little.

    1
    Received the charger and it is as advertised. It peaked at around 25W and then settled at around 22.5W. Something to note is that the longer Anker cable I used to use drops it down to around 8.7W so the cable matters a lot.


    PXL_20211124_194223349.MP.png
    1
    I found a charger, more like power supply, that it gives constant 3a

    Xfinity EPS-10

    not sure if it will damage the battery though, I tried once and it charged it pretty fast... Someone can input something about this?
    Constant 3A means nothing. You're maxing out at 15W since it's not PPS. Higher current is not a good indicator.

    Testing random power bricks is pointless unless you know it supports PPS.

    A PPS charger can fluctuate between 1-4 amps and have a constantly adjusting voltage to maximize power output.
    1
    Received the charger and it is as advertised. It peaked at around 25W and then settled at around 22.5W. Something to note is that the longer Anker cable I used to use drops it down to around 8.7W so the cable matters a lot.


    View attachment 5466909
    My 10ft type c to type c cable doesn't charge any slower than the supplied cable. However it is worth noting that anyone using a type a to type c will be limited to 15w.