[Bliss OS] Stuck on a screen with a _ symbol or similar. Help anyone?

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Nov 22, 2021
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Hello! So, read the title. I have that issue. Help anyone, please?

The laptop is a Dell Inspiron 3501 with Windows 11 and Secure Boot Disabled (just in case it helped with the issue) if the info helps.
 

Tetractys

Senior Member
Jul 2, 2010
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70
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Turin
Samsung Galaxy Tab S2
Xiaomi Mi 9
Hello! So, read the title. I have that issue. Help anyone, please?

The laptop is a Dell Inspiron 3501 with Windows 11 and Secure Boot Disabled (just in case it helped with the issue) if the info helps.
I don't have experience in Win (11, 10 nor previous ones - last touched was in 2001) but if you want to install a Linux distro (anyone!) on a strict win/laptop bundle (if course probably you go to loose warranty.... be careful) i can suggest the follow as first tests steps:

1) simplify the firmware to not use UEFI
2) be sure to have the firmware set on FAT/DOS legacy settings
3) start the laptop with the live Linux distro of your choice *in legacy / DOS mode* NOT in UEFI mode (i recommend an ArchLinux based like Manjaro i.e. very solid and installation friendly)
4) during the installation process, choose to completely reformat the disk(s) in ext4 type fs
5) follow the procedure installing the bootloader on the same disk (if you have at least 8 Gb of ram you can avoid to have a swap partition and you can ever have it after the installation managing it in memory or on the disk - follow wiki for that.
6) reboot.
7) enjoy a pure GNU/Linux Box with legacy (always working) partitioning.

After this will be successful you can experimenting the UEFI mode, eventually.

P.S. This is the simplest method. Cause to complicate things is always easy and dangerous. Follow the "KISS" ArchLinux and derivates as Manjaro principle (Keep It Simple Stupid).
 
Last edited:

Keule-Tm

Senior Member
Oct 3, 2016
389
151
Berlin
Samsung Galaxy S10
I don't have experience in Win (11, 10 nor previous ones - last touched was in 2001) but if you want to install a Linux distro (anyone!) on a strict win/laptop bundle (if course probably you go to loose warranty.... be careful) i can suggest the follow as first tests steps:

1) simplify the firmware to not use UEFI
2) be sure to have the firmware set on FAT/DOS legacy settings
3) start the laptop with the live Linux distro of your choice *in legacy / DOS mode* NOT in UEFI mode (i recommend an ArchLinux based like Manjaro i.e. very solid and installation friendly)
4) during the installation process, choose to completely reformat the disk(s) in ext4 type fs
5) follow the procedure installing the bootloader on the same disk (if you have at least 8 Gb of ram you can avoid to have a swap partition and you can ever have it after the installation managing it in memory or on the disk - follow wiki for that.
6) reboot.
7) enjoy a pure GNU/Linux Box with legacy (always working) partitioning.

After this will be successful you can experimenting the UEFI mode, eventually.

P.S. This is the simplest method. Cause to complicate things is always easy and dangerous. Follow the "KISS" ArchLinux and derivates as Manjaro principle (Keep It Simple Stupid).
Why on earth switch off UEFI? I use it since like 8 years; never had any problems with it.
 
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    I don't have experience in Win (11, 10 nor previous ones - last touched was in 2001) but if you want to install a Linux distro (anyone!) on a strict win/laptop bundle (if course probably you go to loose warranty.... be careful) i can suggest the follow as first tests steps:

    1) simplify the firmware to not use UEFI
    2) be sure to have the firmware set on FAT/DOS legacy settings
    3) start the laptop with the live Linux distro of your choice *in legacy / DOS mode* NOT in UEFI mode (i recommend an ArchLinux based like Manjaro i.e. very solid and installation friendly)
    4) during the installation process, choose to completely reformat the disk(s) in ext4 type fs
    5) follow the procedure installing the bootloader on the same disk (if you have at least 8 Gb of ram you can avoid to have a swap partition and you can ever have it after the installation managing it in memory or on the disk - follow wiki for that.
    6) reboot.
    7) enjoy a pure GNU/Linux Box with legacy (always working) partitioning.

    After this will be successful you can experimenting the UEFI mode, eventually.

    P.S. This is the simplest method. Cause to complicate things is always easy and dangerous. Follow the "KISS" ArchLinux and derivates as Manjaro principle (Keep It Simple Stupid).
    Why on earth switch off UEFI? I use it since like 8 years; never had any problems with it.