exotic resolutions (21:9, 4K, 2560x1080 aso.) on chromecast?

deeper-blue

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Nov 28, 2010
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somewhere in good ol' Germany
Does Chromecast support exotic resolutions like the 2560x1080p for 21:9 screens or 4K? Which HDMI-Version is used in Chromecast?
With a rooted Chromecast it should be possible when someone optimizes the resolution selection during HDMI handshake - how well it would work with casting is a another question. (I intend to try this as I'm running the Chromecast on a 1366x768 display).
 

Asphyx

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Dec 19, 2007
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While it could probably display at those resolutions there is no way the WiFi could handle those streams to make it work.
 

lecorbusier

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Nov 28, 2012
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The maker of the SoC is known, there should be technical specs on their site. I think the SoC is several years old and was developed as a FullHD multimedia device, and nothing more.
 

bhiga

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Oct 13, 2010
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Does Chromecast support exotic resolutions like the 2560x1080p for 21:9 screens or 4K? Which HDMI-Version is used in Chromecast?
Pretty sure it's HDMI 1.3 or 1.4
4K won't happen unless it's at 30p (which is poopy)
But mostly it's designed for standard televisions, so I doubt there is any testing or attention given to resolutions that aren't 4:3 or 16:9 720p or 1080p Heck, given the number of times support for 720p devices has been broken, I don't think they test on anything other than Full HD 1080p.

The maker of the SoC is known, there should be technical specs on their site. I think the SoC is several years old and was developed as a FullHD multimedia device, and nothing more.
I once went looking and couldn't find any specs published. Maybe someone else will have better luck.
It's a Marvell Armada 1500-mini
 

Asphyx

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lecorbusier

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Okay, there's not much in terms of numerical specs to see in the product brief. The upper limit is the HDMI 1.4 spec, but below that, who knows?
Apart from limiting fps, you could use interlacing, or omit sync signals usually needed by crts only. This was necessary to display 1080p, 1200p and 1600*1200 via single link DVI, upon which HDMI is based. But probably the HDMI's link speed is higher, so you could go beyond DVI limits.
 
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bhiga

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How could you connect chromecast to 1366x768 resolution monitor?
Depends on the monitor. Chromecast sends out a video signal on HDMI, not a computer signal, so unless the monitor accepts 1280x720 or 1920x1080 it probably won't work and you'll need a device to convert it. You could use a HDfury Nano GX or similar, but that would cost more than the Chromecast itself and closer to a new 1080p monitor.

If it's a 1366x768 projector or one of the early 720p televisions, or the display has native HDMI and supports HDCP 1.x, then it might stand a chance of working, but in general, unless that monitor is really special, it's probably not worth the trouble to try to make it work. If you already have a Chromecast you can try it though, it won't hurt anything.
 

Lucky_spirit

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Could you please answer which HDMI version Chromecast Ultra has? I have not found any information that there is exactly HDMI 2.0. And 4K 30 FPS is supported with HDMI 1.4.
 

bhiga

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Could you please answer which HDMI version Chromecast Ultra has? I have not found any information that there is exactly HDMI 2.0. And 4K 30 FPS is supported with HDMI 1.4.
This forum is Chromecast 2012, the original model.
It's HDMI 1.x and not HDMI 2.0, supports only up to 1920x1080 resolution.

You might try asking in Google Chromecast (2015) - maybe someone there knows, but generally speaking non-standard resolutions are not of interest to mass-consumer devices - dealing with them requires more than just supporting the actual output resolution/rate, but involves have the applications handle the scaling for different aspect ratios as well, which is extra programming for little/no reward, not to mention extra testing/QA.