Full Root for Nook Glowlight

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N00b-un-2

Senior Member
Jan 29, 2011
213
224
Glendale
ryancuda.blogspot.com
It took some doing, but after following the instructions in this link:
http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=2559915
I was finally able to root my Nook Glowlight. The instructions are kind of sprawled out and extremely unclear so I will sum up.

As always, you will need the ADB. In order to install the ADB, you need the Java Development Kit and the Android Studio (formerly known as the Android SDK)

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/index.html

http://developer.android.com/sdk/installing/studio.html

How to obtain root via ADB: The ONLY way you can root is using Windows. I was successful on Windows 7 32 bit, but it may be possible on other versions.

step 1) install bootloader driver.

You need to grab the drivers from here (bnusbdrivers.zip):

http://forum.xda-developers.com/showpost.php?p=49665945&postcount=279&nocache=1&z=184593200683593

then, open the Device Manager (on Windows). Be ready to right click on the new device 'omap3660' that shows.

With the nook turned completely off, plug in a USB cable. you will have less than 3 seconds to right click the new omap3660 device that shows up in the system profiler.

If you were successful and you right clicked on it in time, manually install the Barnes & Noble USB driver (there are entries added to the generic Google drivers for both the TI Omap 3660 bootloader and the ADB device after you modify the uRamdisk later on)

***NOTE***

If you WEREN'T successful on your first try (took me THREE times to get to it in time), you aren't going to get another chance to install the drivers. At least not easily anyway, because after Windows tries to automatically install the drivers for the bootloader and fails, it will disregard the device any time it shows up after that. So, you are going to need to delete the registry entries that it created, which in my experience was easier said than done. Even admin access was not sufficient to make the necessary changes to the registry.

You will need to launch regedit.exe using another tool called psexec which is available here:

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb897553.aspx

after you download the pstools package, copy those .exe files to C:\Windows\System32\ (in order to add them to $PATH in cmd.exe)

Then, once you've installed the pstools commands to C:\Windows\System32\, run cmd.exe as admin (right click it and select 'run as administrator') and then open regedit.exe with the following command

Code:
psexec -s -i -d regedit.exe
Then, once regedit is open you need to find the keys created by the Nook bootloader and delete them. The Nook bootloader's device ID is 0451:d00e

You are going to be looking in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Current Control Set\enum\usb\ for the keys with the bootloader's device IDs. There may also be keys generated in control set 001 and 002 as well. Delete all of those keys and then reboot your computer. Then with the nook power off completely, repeat the process from the first step. eventually you will be successful installing the bootloader driver.

Step 2) temporarily boot with uRamdisk-noogie
you need to download omaplink.exe from here:
http://www.temblast.com/android.htm

and you also need to download the four files which allow you to temporarily mount the boot partition; omap3_aboot.bin, u-boot-ng2-exp-v03.bin, uImage-ng2-130-stk and uRamdisk-noogie.
They are available here:
http://forum.xda-developers.com/showpost.php?p=49779966&postcount=285

download usbboot-ng2-images-noogie-v1.zip

The next part is easy.

Extract the .zip file and then fire up cmd.exe. cd into the directory of the newly extracted .zip

in the new working directory, enter the command
Code:
omaplink omap3_aboot.bin u-boot-ng2-exp-v03.bin uImage-ng2-130-stk uRamdisk-noogie

Then, with the Nook powered all the way off and omaplink running, plug it in and a few seconds later, after the device boots up all the way, you will be looking at the contents of the boot partition instead of the internal storage like normal.

Step 3) Edit uRamdisk

you will need to download bootutil.exe from here
http://www.temblast.com/android.htm

copy bootutil.exe to C:\Windows\System32

with the boot partition mounted, copy uRamdisk to your computer and extract the files init.rc and default.prop, eg;

Code:
bootutil /x /v uRamdisk init.rc default.prop

then using notepad++ (available here: http://notepad-plus-plus.org/) edit the files as follows

default.prop

ro.secure=0
ro.allow.mock.location=1
ro.debuggable=1
persist.service.adb.enable=1

and

init.rc

comment out lines 375 and 392-399
(do this by adding a # to the beginning of the line)

uncomment line 215
(do this by deleting the # at the beginning of the line)

save both files and then repack them into uRamdisk

Code:
bootutil /r /v uRamdisk init.rc default.prop

copy uRamdisk back onto the Nook, eject the disk and power off the device. Reboot and you should be able to connect to ADB via WiFi

eg;

Code:
 adb connect 192.168.0.10

replacing '10' with whatever IP your Nook is grabbing from your router.

Step 4) Full Root

at this point, you have root access via ADB only. You will not have root access in any apps like Root Explorer, Terminal, TiBackup, etc.

In order to finish PROPERLY rooting your Nook, you need to install 'su' to /system/bin/ and install the superuser.apk

Code:
adb connect 192.168.0.10
adb shell mount -o remount, rw /system
adb push su /system/bin/
adb shell chmod 6755 /system/bin/su
adb install superuser.apk

reboot your device one more time and then you will be fully rooted.

*** Note ***
this devices firmware seems to be a strange hybrid between donut and eclair, although it purports itself to be Android 2.1. The Superuser.apk and su binary came from an old Cyanogenmod 4.6 build in case anyone was wondering (Android Donut). The ones from Cyanogenmod 5 (Android Eclair) do not work. you will get the 'install failed older sdk' error.
 
Last edited:

N00b-un-2

Senior Member
Jan 29, 2011
213
224
Glendale
ryancuda.blogspot.com
installing busybox

I tired installing busybox by using the stericson busybox pro.apk. It would always freeze at 6.47%.

I figured out that if I grabbed an older version of the busybox binary and pushed it to /system/xbin manually and then chmodded it to the proper permissions, auto updates and proper symlinking work using the busybox app

Code:
adb shell mount -o remount, rw /system
adb shell mkdir -p /system/xbin
adb push busybox /system/xbin
adb shell chmod 6755 /system/xbin/busybox
adb install busybox.apk

Then reboot, and run the busybox app to update and create symlinks.
enjoy!
 

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N00b-un-2

Senior Member
Jan 29, 2011
213
224
Glendale
ryancuda.blogspot.com
installing nano and bash

Code:
adb connect 192.168.0.10
adb shell
mount -o remount, rw /system
adb push nano /system/xbin/
chmod 6755 /system/xbin/nano
adb push bash /system/xbin/
chmod 6755 /system/xbin/bash
bash
mv /system/bin/sh /system/bin/sh.bak
ln -s /system/xbin/bash /system/bin/sh
chmod 6755 /system/bin/sh
adb push profile /system/etc/
adb push terminfo /system/etc/

and then in terminal emulator under 'Preferences' change the initial command to

Code:
export TERMINFO=/system/etc/terminfo;export TERM=linux;export HOME=/sdcard;

and finally

Code:
adb push bashrc /sdcard
adb shell
mv /sdcard/bashrc /sdcard/.bashrc
exit

nano works just fine via ADB, but because of lack of 'ctrl' key (and physical buttons to assign it to) you won't be able to write files (ctrl+o) using the terminal on your nook. But between having full proper root access, busybox, a proper bash terminal emulator and nano for editing config files, this should REALLY extend the usefulness of your Nook Glowlight. It should work just fine on other versions of Nook too.
 
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darz

Member
Jan 30, 2005
31
25
Hi N00b-un-2,

Many thanks for your summary!
There is one important edit that I think you missed,
in init.rc you also need to:

Line #375, comment out "disabled" with a # at the start of the line.
(see http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?p=49070213#post49070213)

without this I couldn't get adb to connect.

And since you already made it very noob friendly, might I suggested you clarify:
Line #215 remove # to enable adb over wifi
(rather than search for 5555)

Also, I'm not expert, but I believe the commands to get superuser on the device are (at least it worked for me):
adb connect 192.168.x.x
adb shell mount -o remount, rw /system
adb push su /system/bin/
adb shell chmod 6755 /system/bin/su
adb install superuser.apk

Finally, I'm not sure if this is important, but maybe remount system as read only again:
adb shell mount -o remount, ro /system

Thanks again, nice work!

---------- Post added at 01:48 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:10 PM ----------

Hi again,

had similar issues with installing busybox, here's what worked for me (note needed to run su to create dir):
adb shell mount -o remount, rw /system
adb shell /system/bin/su
adb shell mkdir -p /system/xbin
adb push busybox /system/xbin
adb shell chmod 6755 /system/xbin/busybox
adb install busybox.apk

cheers.
 
Last edited:

N00b-un-2

Senior Member
Jan 29, 2011
213
224
Glendale
ryancuda.blogspot.com
As far as remounting /system as ro, I would HIGHLY recommend just rebooting at this point, otherwise your nook might be stuck in a weird pseudo-rooted state. Probably won't cause any problems, but why risk it?

Thanks for clarifying the line number. I will make the appropriate edits to my instructions. I was working off the top of my head and couldn't remember what exact line the ADB over TCP config was, as I just used ctrl+w '5555' to find it myself.

There are several pre-edited uRamdisk images floating around the forum with various features enabled which would be easier for noobs than extracting the config files and manually editing and then repacking them. In the future I'll probably throw those on here as well.

Hi N00b-un-2,

Many thanks for your summary!
There is one important edit that I think you missed,
in init.rc you also need to:

Line #375, comment out "disabled" with a # at the start of the line.
(see http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?p=49070213#post49070213)

without this I couldn't get adb to connect.

And since you already made it very noob friendly, might I suggested you clarify:
Line #215 remove # to enable adb over wifi
(rather than search for 5555)

Also, I'm not expert, but I believe the commands to get superuser on the device are (at least it worked for me):
adb connect 192.168.x.x
adb shell mount -o remount, rw /system
adb push su /system/bin/
adb shell chmod 6755 /system/bin/su
adb install superuser.apk

Finally, I'm not sure if this is important, but maybe remount system as read only again:
adb shell mount -o remount, ro /system

Thanks again, nice work!

---------- Post added at 01:48 PM ---------- Previous post was at 01:10 PM ----------

Hi again,

had similar issues with installing busybox, here's what worked for me (note needed to run su to create dir):
adb shell mount -o remount, rw /system
adb shell /system/bin/su
adb shell mkdir -p /system/xbin
adb push busybox /system/xbin
adb shell chmod 6755 /system/xbin/busybox
adb install busybox.apk

cheers.
 
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darz

Member
Jan 30, 2005
31
25
There are several pre-edited uRamdisk images floating around the forum with various features enabled which would be easier for noobs than extracting the config files and manually editing and then repacking them. In the future I'll probably throw those on here as well.
Would have been good if I could have easily found a pre-edited image, but your instructions were a great alternative, thanks again ;)
 
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darz

Member
Jan 30, 2005
31
25
Would have been good if I could have easily found a pre-edited image, but your instructions were a great alternative, thanks again ;)

Sorry for the really noob question, I have rooted, wifi adb running and installed apps as per your instructions, but I can't seem to access any of it on the nook. How can I get access to the launcher I installed?
You mentioned pre-edited images, do any of those come with the apps I need to get access to a custom launcher?
Cheers,
Dariusz

==============
Updated: All sorted
==============
For some reason had some issues with ADW launcher, Launcher pro worked fine.

ps I think I made a mistake with the su step I suggested, if you run a one line shell command I don't think it keeps su privileges, so I believe you need to run commands within the shell as per below:
adb shell
mount -o remount, rw /system
/system/bin/su
mkdir -p /system/xbin
exit
adb push busybox /system/xbin
adb shell chmod 6755 /system/xbin/busybox
adb install busybox.apk
 
Last edited:
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valentin1985

New member
Apr 23, 2013
3
0
Varna
Noob

Hey guys any instructions noob friendly or a video in youtube,i stick up at dab connect 192.168.0.10.I dos't have a Windows PC and using Mac whit Parallels Desktop.Is it possible instructions for Mac?
 
Last edited:

darz

Member
Jan 30, 2005
31
25
Hey guys any instructions noob friendly or a video in youtube,i stick up at dab connect 192.168.0.10.I dos't have a Windows PC and using Mac whit Parallels Desktop.Is it possible instructions for Mac?
Before you perform the adb connect step you need to find out what your IP address is:

On your nook, click on the settings icon in the top right corner and then select "Change"
Under Wireless Networks, select the wifi name that you are already connected to (where it says "Connected to the internet")
This will display your connection details, remember that IP address
Now go back to your pc and type:
adb connect [IP address]
 
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N

NOOK!E

Guest
Before you perform the adb connect step you need to find out what your IP address is:

On your nook, click on the settings icon in the top right corner and then select "Change"
Under Wireless Networks, select the wifi name that you are already connected to (where it says "Connected to the internet")
This will display your connection details, remember that IP address
Now go back to your pc and type:
adb connect [IP address]

BIG HINT! If you're using Powershell ISE, you have to type .\adb.exe connect [IP address] or else it won't recognize "adb" as an executable!

Don't ask why, because I don't know. :?
 
N

NOOK!E

Guest
Yes,i try whit dis command .\adb.exe connect 192.168.0.9 but result is the same.

But that's okay! What I said was, if you are using the command program Powershell ISE, do it that way instead. But you are just using cmd.exe, not Powershell ISE!

In cmd.exe, which is what you are using, it is not neccessary to type .\adb.exe. Just type adb. :)

From there, ask someone else in this thread.
 

N00b-un-2

Senior Member
Jan 29, 2011
213
224
Glendale
ryancuda.blogspot.com
But that's okay! What I said was, if you are using the command program Powershell ISE, do it that way instead. But you are just using cmd.exe, not Powershell ISE!

In cmd.exe, which is what you are using, it is not neccessary to type .\adb.exe. Just type adb. :)

From there, ask someone else in this thread.

I prefer to use ConEmu or Console2 when I am forced to use Windows. Not a big fan of CMD.EXE or Powershell/PowershellISE. there are plenty of other CLI alternatives out there
 
N

NOOK!E

Guest
I prefer to use ConEmu or Console2 when I am forced to use Windows. Not a big fan of CMD.EXE or Powershell/PowershellISE. there are plenty of other CLI alternatives out there

Well, as I ONLY use Windows and Powershell ISE has a nice-enough layout for my purposes, I use it. That's why I gave a tip on it.
 

OverByter

Senior Member
Nov 1, 2010
156
23
West Haven
Actually on a lot of installs just typing adb in the command console won't work either unless it's got the path variable set up correctly, I find it easiest to just right click and choose run as administrator, no need for the path to be setup.
OB

Sent from my SPH-D710VMUB using Tapatalk 2
 

real-6

New member
Dec 5, 2011
2
2
FW 1.2.1

Hi guys,

thanks for creating this thread. I was wondering if this rooting procedure was tested with the firmware 1.2.1 ?
 
N

NOOK!E

Guest
Hi guys,

thanks for creating this thread. I was wondering if this rooting procedure was tested with the firmware 1.2.1 ?

This rooting procedure is for the new Nook GlowLight with firmware 1.3.1. Your device is a Nook Simple Touch with GlowLight, which can be rooted very easily using the rooting package here.
 

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  • 13
    It took some doing, but after following the instructions in this link:
    http://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=2559915
    I was finally able to root my Nook Glowlight. The instructions are kind of sprawled out and extremely unclear so I will sum up.

    As always, you will need the ADB. In order to install the ADB, you need the Java Development Kit and the Android Studio (formerly known as the Android SDK)

    http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/index.html

    http://developer.android.com/sdk/installing/studio.html

    How to obtain root via ADB: The ONLY way you can root is using Windows. I was successful on Windows 7 32 bit, but it may be possible on other versions.

    step 1) install bootloader driver.

    You need to grab the drivers from here (bnusbdrivers.zip):

    http://forum.xda-developers.com/showpost.php?p=49665945&postcount=279&nocache=1&z=184593200683593

    then, open the Device Manager (on Windows). Be ready to right click on the new device 'omap3660' that shows.

    With the nook turned completely off, plug in a USB cable. you will have less than 3 seconds to right click the new omap3660 device that shows up in the system profiler.

    If you were successful and you right clicked on it in time, manually install the Barnes & Noble USB driver (there are entries added to the generic Google drivers for both the TI Omap 3660 bootloader and the ADB device after you modify the uRamdisk later on)

    ***NOTE***

    If you WEREN'T successful on your first try (took me THREE times to get to it in time), you aren't going to get another chance to install the drivers. At least not easily anyway, because after Windows tries to automatically install the drivers for the bootloader and fails, it will disregard the device any time it shows up after that. So, you are going to need to delete the registry entries that it created, which in my experience was easier said than done. Even admin access was not sufficient to make the necessary changes to the registry.

    You will need to launch regedit.exe using another tool called psexec which is available here:

    http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb897553.aspx

    after you download the pstools package, copy those .exe files to C:\Windows\System32\ (in order to add them to $PATH in cmd.exe)

    Then, once you've installed the pstools commands to C:\Windows\System32\, run cmd.exe as admin (right click it and select 'run as administrator') and then open regedit.exe with the following command

    Code:
    psexec -s -i -d regedit.exe
    Then, once regedit is open you need to find the keys created by the Nook bootloader and delete them. The Nook bootloader's device ID is 0451:d00e

    You are going to be looking in HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\Current Control Set\enum\usb\ for the keys with the bootloader's device IDs. There may also be keys generated in control set 001 and 002 as well. Delete all of those keys and then reboot your computer. Then with the nook power off completely, repeat the process from the first step. eventually you will be successful installing the bootloader driver.

    Step 2) temporarily boot with uRamdisk-noogie
    you need to download omaplink.exe from here:
    http://www.temblast.com/android.htm

    and you also need to download the four files which allow you to temporarily mount the boot partition; omap3_aboot.bin, u-boot-ng2-exp-v03.bin, uImage-ng2-130-stk and uRamdisk-noogie.
    They are available here:
    http://forum.xda-developers.com/showpost.php?p=49779966&postcount=285

    download usbboot-ng2-images-noogie-v1.zip

    The next part is easy.

    Extract the .zip file and then fire up cmd.exe. cd into the directory of the newly extracted .zip

    in the new working directory, enter the command
    Code:
    omaplink omap3_aboot.bin u-boot-ng2-exp-v03.bin uImage-ng2-130-stk uRamdisk-noogie

    Then, with the Nook powered all the way off and omaplink running, plug it in and a few seconds later, after the device boots up all the way, you will be looking at the contents of the boot partition instead of the internal storage like normal.

    Step 3) Edit uRamdisk

    you will need to download bootutil.exe from here
    http://www.temblast.com/android.htm

    copy bootutil.exe to C:\Windows\System32

    with the boot partition mounted, copy uRamdisk to your computer and extract the files init.rc and default.prop, eg;

    Code:
    bootutil /x /v uRamdisk init.rc default.prop

    then using notepad++ (available here: http://notepad-plus-plus.org/) edit the files as follows

    default.prop

    ro.secure=0
    ro.allow.mock.location=1
    ro.debuggable=1
    persist.service.adb.enable=1

    and

    init.rc

    comment out lines 375 and 392-399
    (do this by adding a # to the beginning of the line)

    uncomment line 215
    (do this by deleting the # at the beginning of the line)

    save both files and then repack them into uRamdisk

    Code:
    bootutil /r /v uRamdisk init.rc default.prop

    copy uRamdisk back onto the Nook, eject the disk and power off the device. Reboot and you should be able to connect to ADB via WiFi

    eg;

    Code:
     adb connect 192.168.0.10

    replacing '10' with whatever IP your Nook is grabbing from your router.

    Step 4) Full Root

    at this point, you have root access via ADB only. You will not have root access in any apps like Root Explorer, Terminal, TiBackup, etc.

    In order to finish PROPERLY rooting your Nook, you need to install 'su' to /system/bin/ and install the superuser.apk

    Code:
    adb connect 192.168.0.10
    adb shell mount -o remount, rw /system
    adb push su /system/bin/
    adb shell chmod 6755 /system/bin/su
    adb install superuser.apk

    reboot your device one more time and then you will be fully rooted.

    *** Note ***
    this devices firmware seems to be a strange hybrid between donut and eclair, although it purports itself to be Android 2.1. The Superuser.apk and su binary came from an old Cyanogenmod 4.6 build in case anyone was wondering (Android Donut). The ones from Cyanogenmod 5 (Android Eclair) do not work. you will get the 'install failed older sdk' error.
    5
    Hi,

    Thanks very much for the guide. I had some trouble getting the driver installed and eventually found an alternative way to do it, which doesn't involve right clicking on the device before it disappears.

    If you open an elveated command prompt and type the following:
    set devmgr_show_nonpresent_devices=1
    and then launch device manager from the same command prompt by typing:
    devmgmt.msc
    and then go to 'View' and select 'Show hidden devices', you'll be able to see the omap3660 device and set the correct driver for it.
    4
    Post-rooting steps for total newbies like me.

    After reading lots of threads and experimenting, I managed to get my NGL set up how I wanted. For others who, like me, know nothing about rooting, here's what I did.

    First, many thanks to N00b-un-2, ИΘΘK¡€, Renate NST, paulobrien, and spedinfargo for all of their help throughout the forums. Everything here is more or less pieced together for separate pieces of advice that they'd posted earlier. Also, sorry if anything here seems trivial or annoyingly obvious. Thing is, it wasn't all obvious to me until after I'd made sense of it all... :eek:

    Anyway, I'd followed N00b-un-2's rooting instructions at the top of this thread, but when I tried installing Busybox, it seemed as if things weren't working out (I'd see "rm failed for -f, Read-only file system"). Eventually, though, I just decided to ignore that issue and stop worrying that I was going to brick my Nook. :fingers-crossed:

    First I plugged my Nook into the computer's USB port and connected to it via adb. In a terminal, I typed
    Code:
    adb connect 10.0.0.12
    (with those digits being the IP address of my Nook, which I figured out by going into the Nook's settings, selecting Wireless, and clicking on the SSID that it was connected to.)

    Next, I downloaded and unzipped N00b-un-2's collection of apps from here: http://forum.xda-developers.com/showpost.php?p=54855773&postcount=1 Within the unzipped folder, I ran this command:
    Code:
    adb install ADWLauncher.apk
    After that, it was all easy. When I hit the N button on my Nook, it gave me the option of completing the action using "Home" or "ADW Launcher." After choosing the latter, I was looking at something similar to the home screen on my Android phone. Playing around with the softkeys on the screen took me to the App Drawer that displayed various other apps (e.g. browser, library, etc.)

    To load up my Nook with additional apps, I'd find one on the Google Play store, then copy-and-paste the URL into http://apps.evozi.com/apk-downloader/ in order to download the package. Then I'd install it on my Nook via USB using the aforementioned "install" command. To uninstall an app that I didn't like, the command was
    Code:
    adb uninstall org.adw.launcher
    (or whatever the undesired app is. To see the apps by their name, run "adb shell ls -l /data/data". I found this helpful, because the files I installed had a different date than the ones that came stock on the Nook.)

    Also, I could only install apps that were developed for Android 2.1 and earlier. Some apps on the Google Market are too recent, like the Kindle app, but by searching for the app here on xda-developers, I was able to find some earlier, compatible versions.

    Thanks again, everyone, for your help. I hope my meager contribution here can help spare one or two people a couple hours of fiddling and worrying.
    3
    installing busybox

    I tired installing busybox by using the stericson busybox pro.apk. It would always freeze at 6.47%.

    I figured out that if I grabbed an older version of the busybox binary and pushed it to /system/xbin manually and then chmodded it to the proper permissions, auto updates and proper symlinking work using the busybox app

    Code:
    adb shell mount -o remount, rw /system
    adb shell mkdir -p /system/xbin
    adb push busybox /system/xbin
    adb shell chmod 6755 /system/xbin/busybox
    adb install busybox.apk

    Then reboot, and run the busybox app to update and create symlinks.
    enjoy!
    2
    installing nano and bash

    Code:
    adb connect 192.168.0.10
    adb shell
    mount -o remount, rw /system
    adb push nano /system/xbin/
    chmod 6755 /system/xbin/nano
    adb push bash /system/xbin/
    chmod 6755 /system/xbin/bash
    bash
    mv /system/bin/sh /system/bin/sh.bak
    ln -s /system/xbin/bash /system/bin/sh
    chmod 6755 /system/bin/sh
    adb push profile /system/etc/
    adb push terminfo /system/etc/

    and then in terminal emulator under 'Preferences' change the initial command to

    Code:
    export TERMINFO=/system/etc/terminfo;export TERM=linux;export HOME=/sdcard;

    and finally

    Code:
    adb push bashrc /sdcard
    adb shell
    mv /sdcard/bashrc /sdcard/.bashrc
    exit

    nano works just fine via ADB, but because of lack of 'ctrl' key (and physical buttons to assign it to) you won't be able to write files (ctrl+o) using the terminal on your nook. But between having full proper root access, busybox, a proper bash terminal emulator and nano for editing config files, this should REALLY extend the usefulness of your Nook Glowlight. It should work just fine on other versions of Nook too.