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Good read on Li-poly batteries

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drvsbsm

Senior Member
Jan 14, 2012
296
86
Ohio
From what this guy says is to only let your battery cycle a few times then charge whenever it needs it and this will increase battery life cycle.
I can't complain I get pretty good overall battery life, although I would like to see what a replacement modded 2200-2500 battery would be like in this beast!

http://androidforums.com/evo-4g-tips-tricks/213618-lithium-polymer-batteries-101-a.html

Every phone I've owned after my Treo 300 has been powered by a Lithium Polymer battery, and I've seen the same misconceptions and incomplete or bad information about those batteries in the forums for every one of those phones including the Evo. Well I'm home sick and can't do much else besides cough, so I'm going to try to educate y'all a little.

And why do I think I'm qualified to do that? Well I just turned 60 and I've been actively involved with electronics, both as a hobby and professionally, since I was 10. I've also been a model (R/C) aviator for many years and rechargable batteries have played a huge role in both of those pursuits. I began using LiPo cells in my projects and planes long before they started appearing in consumer electronics. Not much was known about them back then and we were basically on our own to figure out what worked and what didn't and we also had to design and build our own chargers. Those were exciting times given LiPo cells' tendency to "vent with flame" when they aren't happy.

So without getting too technical, here are some things you should know about LiPo battery packs:

The single most important thing you need to know is LiPo batteries can explode. They actually "vent with flame" with a big woosh, but "explode" seems to be the most popular description. Perhaps the surest and quickest way to make that happen is charge them beyond 4.2V per cell. Modern consumer electronics have plenty of built-in safeguards in place to prevent that from happening, but some "budget" battery packs and chargers don't have all the safeguards. The other common reasons LiPo packs explode is excessive heat and physical damage. I've personally seen two cars which had phones explode on the dashboard and it wasn't pretty. I also saw an executive's desk after a phone exploded in a drawer nearly 12 hours after he rolled over it with his car. The technical name for the phenomenon is "thermal runaway" and the actual chances of it happening to you are pretty slim if you stick to name brand batteries and chargers and use some common sense.

And you never want to forget or ignore this simple rule: If a battery pack ever starts to puff up like a little pillow or change size or shape in any other way, treat it like a firebomb with the timer ticking. Take it outside and put it in your barbecue or a steel pail or something.

While I'm on the "vent with flame" rant I'd like to add this: Almost all modern cell phones (including the Evo) use a single-cell (3.7V) battery pack. The charging circuit in the phone will prevent you from overcharging it, but all bets are off if you remove the pack from the phone and charge it in an external charger. One very common way model aviators accidently blow up LiPo packs is by charging them with a charger set to a higher cell count, and this could happen to a cell phone battery if you were to try to charge it with a charger made for a camera, for example. The other way model aviators blow up packs is by charging them at a higher current rating than they're designed for. I mention this because it may not be a good idea to charge a stock 1500mAh battery with an external charger designed for a 3000 mAh battery, but I can't say for sure without knowing the charging current of the charger. It would be both safe and acceptable to charge a 3000mAh battery with a charger designed for a 1500mAh battery, but it would take twice as long.

Next, you never want to discharge a LiPo cell below 3V per cell. 3V is completely discharged for a LiPo cell and if you go below that voltage you'll do unrecoverable damage to the cell chemistry. Once again, modern consumer electronics have plenty of built-in safeguards in place to prevent that from happening, but it's not hard to do by accident or by design once the battery is out of the device. Put the battery in an external charger and unplug it, for example ... No, don't.

There is no practical reason to unnecessarily discharge or cycle a LiPo pack. All you'll accomplish is reduce the number of charge-discharge cycles the pack will be capable of before it begins losing capacity. LiPo packs don't develop a "memory" like the old Ni-Cad cells did and they'll last significantly longer if subjected to partial charge-discharge cycles than they will with full charge-discharge cycles. In layman's terms, your battery will last longer if you charge it whenever you can rather than wait until you have to all the time. Also, the capacity of new LiPo pack will usually improve after it's been through a few charge-discharge cycles, but the best way to do that is through normal use.

LiPo cells have a shelf-life and they basically begin to degrade on the day they're assembled. But they degrade faster if they're stored at full charge, so if you won't use a battery pack for a significant length of time (~2 weeks or more), discharge it about half way before you store it. You don't need to get real technical about this because close counts. Just use the battery until the gauge shows about half green.

And finally this, for those of you who are compelled to play with volt meters:

A fully-charged healthy LiPo cell will have a resting voltage of 4.2V, but the nominal working voltage is only 3.7V. As I mentioned above, these cells are completely depleated when the resting voltage reaches 3.0V so the entire working voltage range for a LiPo cell is only 0.7V nominal. In low-current devices like a cell phone the actual working voltage range is more like 3.85V to 3V, but that additional 0.15V doesn't really amount to much. So what happens to that voltage range between 4.2 - 3.7V? In the simplest of terms, it's just a surface charge of sorts. Even at low current loads the voltage will quickly drop to the nominal working voltage where it will hold pretty close to steady until the cell is about 80% depleated.


The graph above is a typical 6C discharge voltage curve for an average LiPo cell. 6C means the cell was discharged at a rate (in mA) that was 6 times the rated capacity of the cell (in mAh). In other words, if the cell was a stock 1500mAh cell for the Evo, then the discharge rate would be 6 x 1500 or 9000mA (9A). Needless to say, a cell phone will only draw a tiny fraction of that current which would affect the curve in the following way: The starting voltage would be more like 4.1V and it would quickly drop to around 3.8V instead of 3.6V. Then the voltage would gradually drop until it hit about 3.4V and drop from there relatively quickly.

And that is just about everything you need to know to get along with Lithium Polymer battery packs and then some. To wrap this up, here's a short video of what can happen if you mistreat a LiPo battery. Judging by the visual evidence, my guess is it's a single 2100 to 2500mAh cell:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4OsBc8RqSKU

BatteryInfo.jpg


backfromthestorm
All well and good, but ours are li-ion in the one x


Quoted from another post here on XDA


I'm learning this myself but it is good info for us since we can not take our battery and replace it.

This Google search shows the One X has Li-poly battery, many of pages good info the One X using Lithium Polymer Battery type, so that is the info I'm using.
https://www.google.com/#hl=en&sclie....,cf.osb&fp=3ca401bf196c59f0&biw=1920&bih=950

Specs here on XDA say its Battery: Standard battery, Lithium Polymer 1800 mAh
http://forum.xda-developers.com/wiki/HTC_One_X
Specification

Processor: 1500 MHz NVIDIA Tegra 3 AP33H
Operating System: Google Android 4.0.3 (ICS) with HTC Sense 4.0
Memory:
32GB internal
1024 MB RAM
Dimensions: 2.8 x 5.3 x 0.4 inches
Weight: 130g
Display:
Type: S-LCD 2 capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Size: 720x1280 pixels, 4.7 inches
Gorilla glass screen
Multi-touch input method
Connectivity:
Bluetooth® 4.0 with EDR,A2DP,AVRCP
Wi-Fi®: IEEE 802.11 b/g/n
Near-Field Communication
Micro USB Port
TV-out (via MHL A/V link, 1080p)
Camera: 8 megapixel color with autofocus, LED flash, 1080p recording, ImageSense Chip
Battery: Standard battery, Lithium Polymer 1800 mAh
Network:
GSM850, GSM900, GSM1800, GSM1900, UMTS850 (B5), UMTS900 (B8), UMTS1900 (B2), UMTS2100 (B1)
Data: GPRS, EDGE, UMTS, HSDPA, HSUPA, HSPA+



http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/charging_lithium_ion_batteries
READ DOWN AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE

Charging Lithium-ion Polymer

Charging Li‑ion polymer, also referred as Li-polymer, is very similar to a regular lithium-ion battery and no changes in algorithm are necessary. Most users won’t even know if their battery is Li‑ion or Li‑polymer. The word “polymer” has been used as promotional hype and does not reflect special attributes other than to know that the battery is built in a different way to a standard Li-ion.

Most polymer batteries are based on a hybrid architecture that is a cross between Li-ion and Li-polymer. There are many variations within the polymer family, and the true dry polymer battery for the consumer market is still years away. Also know as the “plastic battery,” this system was first announced in early 2000 but was never able to attain the conductivity needed for most applications at ambient temperatures. Read more about the Lithium-polymer battery and the Pouch Cell.
Simple Guidelines for Charging Lithium-based Batteries

A portable device should be turned off while charging. This allows the battery to reach the threshold voltage unhindered and reflects the correct saturation current responsible to terminate the charge. A parasitic load confuses the charger.

Charge at a moderate temperature. Do not charge below freezing.

Lithium-ion does not need to be fully charged; a partial charge is better.

Chargers use different methods for “ready” indication. The light signal may not always indicate a full charge.

Discontinue using charger and/or battery if the battery gets excessively warm.

Before prolonged storage, apply some charge to bring the pack to about half charge.

Over-discharged batteries can be “boosted” to life again. Discard pack if the voltage does not rise to a normal level within a minute while on boost.
 
Last edited:

[email protected]

Senior Member
Mar 7, 2011
520
110
Windsor
I've been using LiPo batteries for the last 5 years in my Trex 450, 500 & 600 along with my electric planes too... they are something like half the weight with 1/3 more power than NiCads...and NiMetalhydrite ..... I've never had issues wity them providing they're used properly..

Really surprised they haven't taken over the LiIon batts in phones ....

Below is my Trex 600 using a 6 Cell 3000mAh LiPo with a 25C and a 35 burst rating ....


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw99SjxLdyA&feature=youtube_gdata_player


Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I717 using XDA
 

shadehh

Senior Member
Mar 27, 2011
888
288
I've been using LiPo batteries for the last 5 years in my Trex 450, 500 & 600 along with my electric planes too... they are something like half the weight with 1/3 more power than NiCads...and NiMetalhydrite ..... I've never had issues wity them providing they're used properly..

Really surprised they haven't taken over the LiIon batts in phones ....

Below is my Trex 600 using a 6 Cell 3000mAh LiPo with a 25C and a 35 burst rating ....


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vw99SjxLdyA&feature=youtube_gdata_player


Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I717 using XDA

What's to be understood under: "with 1/3 more power than NiCads...and NiMetalhydrite". Does that mean, for example, while it does have the same capacity as a none liPo battery that it actually still does pack more? I know, sounds contradicting but I think you know what i mean.
 

Raider0001

Senior Member
Apr 26, 2011
305
20
I also had some experience with batteries in many devices and i have only 1 thing to say to all of You - just use the device !
Everything that is important is already sorted out for You.
I personally think that batteries in HTC One X are very durable and treated like an egg by device itself, firstly HTC optimizing Sense 4.0, secondly Google`s Android is 4.0 not a beta 1.0, last thing is that the body of the unit acts like a radiator grill cooling down battery and CPU.
There is only 1 thing to look at, if u see that the phone is idling but its getting HOT, check for badly made application that uses the CPU and kill it.
 
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PhoenixFx

Senior Member
Dec 1, 2006
659
128
Here are some more reading material for those who are interested in learning about Li-Poly batteries.:


According to those guides its always better to do partial discharges and charge before the battry goes completely dead. That way you can prolong the lifetime of your battery. As a habit I normally don’t let my batteries discharge below 30% if I can help it. My previous Galaxy S used to have about 40% charge at the end of the day. I’m yet to buy a HTC One X, but hope it won’t fully discharge by the end of the day. Since One X doesn’t have a removable battery prolonging the life time is critical.
 
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BenPope

Senior Member
Dec 20, 2007
3,900
1,118
What's to be understood under: "with 1/3 more power than NiCads...and NiMetalhydrite". Does that mean, for example, while it does have the same capacity as a none liPo battery that it actually still does pack more? I know, sounds contradicting but I think you know what i mean.

No it means density of stored charge, so for a given battery physical dimension and weight, a LiIon/LiPoly battery will have around 1/3 extra mAh than NiMh and NiCd.

Sent from my HTC One X using XDA
 

drvsbsm

Senior Member
Jan 14, 2012
296
86
Ohio
Some of these phones are getting pretty hot. I have read post of people getting up to the high 60c range here is some info that I just found that goes along with the temps that you are experiencing. If your cell is getting over 60c your battery will die out at a more rapid pace or more serious it could explode and catch on fire. HTC better be getting some fixes and updates out because this could be some big trouble if a reported fires would happen. :eek: So come on with those updates HTC.

CELL PHONE BATTERY PICTURE
742px-Lipolybattery.jpg
 
Last edited:

drvsbsm

Senior Member
Jan 14, 2012
296
86
Ohio
After reading all of that information I don't let mine go below half and the battery seems to be doing really good. The thing that caught my eye was on another site where they use the same type of battery in radio controlled airplanes is that you get about 500-600 full cycles with these types of batteries, but if you don't let it drain all the way it isn't considered a full cycle. So it would also seem the battery life would last longer and they also said not to use the phone while charging if possible, turn it off and charge.
 
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BenPope

Senior Member
Dec 20, 2007
3,900
1,118
No they are not, lithium-ion is quite different to lithium-ion polymer ;)

Read first line of this... http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium-ion_battery

The electrolyte is stored in a composite polymer rather than an organic solvent. Otherwise they are pretty much the same; it doesn't change the charge/discharge characteristics or the energy density. You can even use the same charger. From a black box perspective, they are the same, it's just that with LiPo, your box has more options on shape and might be cheaper to manufacture.
 

PhilipL

Senior Member
Jun 2, 2007
714
523
Hi

After reading all of that information I don't let mine go below half and the battery seems to be doing really good. The thing that caught my eye was on another site where they use the same type of battery in radio controlled airplanes is that you get about 500-600 full cycles with these types of batteries, but if you don't let it drain all the way it isn't considered a full cycle. So it would also seem the battery life would last longer and they also said not to use the phone while charging if possible, turn it off and charge.

A top up charge also helps because the battery has less time to heat up before it's full than it would with a longer charge from flat to full. Heat is a big aging factor of these types of batteries. Never charge the phone on the carpet or other soft furnishing which insulates them and causes more heat, and is a fire hazard, if you can charge them keeping the phone cool on something solid and nice and conductive for heat, for example a metal surface.

Of course while charging from 50% to 100% avoids a full cycle so you get more cycles, a big chunk of that advantage is cancelled out because you are only getting half the use of the battery each time and so are charging it twice as often, so overall while it helps to keep topping it up, I don't think anyone needs to excessively worry about this. Just use the phone :D

Regard

Phil
 

treebill

Senior Member
Jan 28, 2011
2,135
566
Hi



A top up charge also helps because the battery has less time to heat up before it's full than it would with a longer charge from flat to full. Heat is a big aging factor of these types of batteries. Never charge the phone on the carpet or other soft furnishing which insulates them and causes more heat, and is a fire hazard, if you can charge them keeping the phone cool on something solid and nice and conductive for heat, for example a metal surface.

Of course while charging from 50% to 100% avoids a full cycle so you get more cycles, a big chunk of that advantage is cancelled out because you are only getting half the use of the battery each time and so are charging it twice as often, so overall while it helps to keep topping it up, I don't think anyone needs to excessively worry about this. Just use the phone :D

Regard

Phil

I don't think you get more cycles, charging 50% to 100% letting it drop to 50% then charge to 100% is one cycle.

50% - 100% = 1/2 cycle

but doing smaller charges means it takes longer before you start losing the capacity from wear and tear, but by the time i get any negative effect to charging my contract will be long up and ill be getting my self the newest shinny toy :)
 

-juanito-

Senior Member
Oct 22, 2010
2,169
134
i was i have htc Sensation and the bettery is better than HOX battery

i installed ARHD ROM & Faux Kernel UV

i don't see any improvments

Sent from my HTC One X using Tapatalk 2
 

drvsbsm

Senior Member
Jan 14, 2012
296
86
Ohio
No they are not, lithium-ion is quite different to lithium-ion polymer ;)

Read first line of this... http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium-ion_battery

I'm learning this myself but it is good info for us since we can not take our battery and replace it.

This Google search shows the One X has Li-poly battery, many of pages good info the One X using Lithium Polymer Battery type, so that is the info I'm using.
https://www.google.com/#hl=en&sclie....,cf.osb&fp=3ca401bf196c59f0&biw=1920&bih=950

Specs here on XDA say its Battery: Standard battery, Lithium Polymer 1800 mAh
http://forum.xda-developers.com/wiki/HTC_One_X
Specification

Processor: 1500 MHz NVIDIA Tegra 3 AP33H
Operating System: Google Android 4.0.3 (ICS) with HTC Sense 4.0
Memory:
32GB internal
1024 MB RAM
Dimensions: 2.8 x 5.3 x 0.4 inches
Weight: 130g
Display:
Type: S-LCD 2 capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
Size: 720x1280 pixels, 4.7 inches
Gorilla glass screen
Multi-touch input method
Connectivity:
Bluetooth® 4.0 with EDR,A2DP,AVRCP
Wi-Fi®: IEEE 802.11 b/g/n
Near-Field Communication
Micro USB Port
TV-out (via MHL A/V link, 1080p)
Camera: 8 megapixel color with autofocus, LED flash, 1080p recording, ImageSense Chip
Battery: Standard battery, Lithium Polymer 1800 mAh
Network:
GSM850, GSM900, GSM1800, GSM1900, UMTS850 (B5), UMTS900 (B8), UMTS1900 (B2), UMTS2100 (B1)
Data: GPRS, EDGE, UMTS, HSDPA, HSUPA, HSPA+



http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/charging_lithium_ion_batteries
READ DOWN AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE

Charging Lithium-ion Polymer

Charging Li‑ion polymer, also referred as Li-polymer, is very similar to a regular lithium-ion battery and no changes in algorithm are necessary. Most users won’t even know if their battery is Li‑ion or Li‑polymer. The word “polymer” has been used as promotional hype and does not reflect special attributes other than to know that the battery is built in a different way to a standard Li-ion.

Most polymer batteries are based on a hybrid architecture that is a cross between Li-ion and Li-polymer. There are many variations within the polymer family, and the true dry polymer battery for the consumer market is still years away. Also know as the “plastic battery,” this system was first announced in early 2000 but was never able to attain the conductivity needed for most applications at ambient temperatures. Read more about the Lithium-polymer battery and the Pouch Cell.
Simple Guidelines for Charging Lithium-based Batteries

A portable device should be turned off while charging. This allows the battery to reach the threshold voltage unhindered and reflects the correct saturation current responsible to terminate the charge. A parasitic load confuses the charger.

Charge at a moderate temperature. Do not charge below freezing.

Lithium-ion does not need to be fully charged; a partial charge is better.

Chargers use different methods for “ready” indication. The light signal may not always indicate a full charge.

Discontinue using charger and/or battery if the battery gets excessively warm.

Before prolonged storage, apply some charge to bring the pack to about half charge.

Over-discharged batteries can be “boosted” to life again. Discard pack if the voltage does not rise to a normal level within a minute while on boost.
 
Last edited:

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    From what this guy says is to only let your battery cycle a few times then charge whenever it needs it and this will increase battery life cycle.
    I can't complain I get pretty good overall battery life, although I would like to see what a replacement modded 2200-2500 battery would be like in this beast!

    http://androidforums.com/evo-4g-tips-tricks/213618-lithium-polymer-batteries-101-a.html

    Every phone I've owned after my Treo 300 has been powered by a Lithium Polymer battery, and I've seen the same misconceptions and incomplete or bad information about those batteries in the forums for every one of those phones including the Evo. Well I'm home sick and can't do much else besides cough, so I'm going to try to educate y'all a little.

    And why do I think I'm qualified to do that? Well I just turned 60 and I've been actively involved with electronics, both as a hobby and professionally, since I was 10. I've also been a model (R/C) aviator for many years and rechargable batteries have played a huge role in both of those pursuits. I began using LiPo cells in my projects and planes long before they started appearing in consumer electronics. Not much was known about them back then and we were basically on our own to figure out what worked and what didn't and we also had to design and build our own chargers. Those were exciting times given LiPo cells' tendency to "vent with flame" when they aren't happy.

    So without getting too technical, here are some things you should know about LiPo battery packs:

    The single most important thing you need to know is LiPo batteries can explode. They actually "vent with flame" with a big woosh, but "explode" seems to be the most popular description. Perhaps the surest and quickest way to make that happen is charge them beyond 4.2V per cell. Modern consumer electronics have plenty of built-in safeguards in place to prevent that from happening, but some "budget" battery packs and chargers don't have all the safeguards. The other common reasons LiPo packs explode is excessive heat and physical damage. I've personally seen two cars which had phones explode on the dashboard and it wasn't pretty. I also saw an executive's desk after a phone exploded in a drawer nearly 12 hours after he rolled over it with his car. The technical name for the phenomenon is "thermal runaway" and the actual chances of it happening to you are pretty slim if you stick to name brand batteries and chargers and use some common sense.

    And you never want to forget or ignore this simple rule: If a battery pack ever starts to puff up like a little pillow or change size or shape in any other way, treat it like a firebomb with the timer ticking. Take it outside and put it in your barbecue or a steel pail or something.

    While I'm on the "vent with flame" rant I'd like to add this: Almost all modern cell phones (including the Evo) use a single-cell (3.7V) battery pack. The charging circuit in the phone will prevent you from overcharging it, but all bets are off if you remove the pack from the phone and charge it in an external charger. One very common way model aviators accidently blow up LiPo packs is by charging them with a charger set to a higher cell count, and this could happen to a cell phone battery if you were to try to charge it with a charger made for a camera, for example. The other way model aviators blow up packs is by charging them at a higher current rating than they're designed for. I mention this because it may not be a good idea to charge a stock 1500mAh battery with an external charger designed for a 3000 mAh battery, but I can't say for sure without knowing the charging current of the charger. It would be both safe and acceptable to charge a 3000mAh battery with a charger designed for a 1500mAh battery, but it would take twice as long.

    Next, you never want to discharge a LiPo cell below 3V per cell. 3V is completely discharged for a LiPo cell and if you go below that voltage you'll do unrecoverable damage to the cell chemistry. Once again, modern consumer electronics have plenty of built-in safeguards in place to prevent that from happening, but it's not hard to do by accident or by design once the battery is out of the device. Put the battery in an external charger and unplug it, for example ... No, don't.

    There is no practical reason to unnecessarily discharge or cycle a LiPo pack. All you'll accomplish is reduce the number of charge-discharge cycles the pack will be capable of before it begins losing capacity. LiPo packs don't develop a "memory" like the old Ni-Cad cells did and they'll last significantly longer if subjected to partial charge-discharge cycles than they will with full charge-discharge cycles. In layman's terms, your battery will last longer if you charge it whenever you can rather than wait until you have to all the time. Also, the capacity of new LiPo pack will usually improve after it's been through a few charge-discharge cycles, but the best way to do that is through normal use.

    LiPo cells have a shelf-life and they basically begin to degrade on the day they're assembled. But they degrade faster if they're stored at full charge, so if you won't use a battery pack for a significant length of time (~2 weeks or more), discharge it about half way before you store it. You don't need to get real technical about this because close counts. Just use the battery until the gauge shows about half green.

    And finally this, for those of you who are compelled to play with volt meters:

    A fully-charged healthy LiPo cell will have a resting voltage of 4.2V, but the nominal working voltage is only 3.7V. As I mentioned above, these cells are completely depleated when the resting voltage reaches 3.0V so the entire working voltage range for a LiPo cell is only 0.7V nominal. In low-current devices like a cell phone the actual working voltage range is more like 3.85V to 3V, but that additional 0.15V doesn't really amount to much. So what happens to that voltage range between 4.2 - 3.7V? In the simplest of terms, it's just a surface charge of sorts. Even at low current loads the voltage will quickly drop to the nominal working voltage where it will hold pretty close to steady until the cell is about 80% depleated.


    The graph above is a typical 6C discharge voltage curve for an average LiPo cell. 6C means the cell was discharged at a rate (in mA) that was 6 times the rated capacity of the cell (in mAh). In other words, if the cell was a stock 1500mAh cell for the Evo, then the discharge rate would be 6 x 1500 or 9000mA (9A). Needless to say, a cell phone will only draw a tiny fraction of that current which would affect the curve in the following way: The starting voltage would be more like 4.1V and it would quickly drop to around 3.8V instead of 3.6V. Then the voltage would gradually drop until it hit about 3.4V and drop from there relatively quickly.

    And that is just about everything you need to know to get along with Lithium Polymer battery packs and then some. To wrap this up, here's a short video of what can happen if you mistreat a LiPo battery. Judging by the visual evidence, my guess is it's a single 2100 to 2500mAh cell:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4OsBc8RqSKU

    BatteryInfo.jpg


    backfromthestorm
    All well and good, but ours are li-ion in the one x


    Quoted from another post here on XDA


    I'm learning this myself but it is good info for us since we can not take our battery and replace it.

    This Google search shows the One X has Li-poly battery, many of pages good info the One X using Lithium Polymer Battery type, so that is the info I'm using.
    https://www.google.com/#hl=en&sclie....,cf.osb&fp=3ca401bf196c59f0&biw=1920&bih=950

    Specs here on XDA say its Battery: Standard battery, Lithium Polymer 1800 mAh
    http://forum.xda-developers.com/wiki/HTC_One_X
    Specification

    Processor: 1500 MHz NVIDIA Tegra 3 AP33H
    Operating System: Google Android 4.0.3 (ICS) with HTC Sense 4.0
    Memory:
    32GB internal
    1024 MB RAM
    Dimensions: 2.8 x 5.3 x 0.4 inches
    Weight: 130g
    Display:
    Type: S-LCD 2 capacitive touchscreen, 16M colors
    Size: 720x1280 pixels, 4.7 inches
    Gorilla glass screen
    Multi-touch input method
    Connectivity:
    Bluetooth® 4.0 with EDR,A2DP,AVRCP
    Wi-Fi®: IEEE 802.11 b/g/n
    Near-Field Communication
    Micro USB Port
    TV-out (via MHL A/V link, 1080p)
    Camera: 8 megapixel color with autofocus, LED flash, 1080p recording, ImageSense Chip
    Battery: Standard battery, Lithium Polymer 1800 mAh
    Network:
    GSM850, GSM900, GSM1800, GSM1900, UMTS850 (B5), UMTS900 (B8), UMTS1900 (B2), UMTS2100 (B1)
    Data: GPRS, EDGE, UMTS, HSDPA, HSUPA, HSPA+



    http://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/charging_lithium_ion_batteries
    READ DOWN AT THE BOTTOM OF THE PAGE

    Charging Lithium-ion Polymer

    Charging Li‑ion polymer, also referred as Li-polymer, is very similar to a regular lithium-ion battery and no changes in algorithm are necessary. Most users won’t even know if their battery is Li‑ion or Li‑polymer. The word “polymer” has been used as promotional hype and does not reflect special attributes other than to know that the battery is built in a different way to a standard Li-ion.

    Most polymer batteries are based on a hybrid architecture that is a cross between Li-ion and Li-polymer. There are many variations within the polymer family, and the true dry polymer battery for the consumer market is still years away. Also know as the “plastic battery,” this system was first announced in early 2000 but was never able to attain the conductivity needed for most applications at ambient temperatures. Read more about the Lithium-polymer battery and the Pouch Cell.
    Simple Guidelines for Charging Lithium-based Batteries

    A portable device should be turned off while charging. This allows the battery to reach the threshold voltage unhindered and reflects the correct saturation current responsible to terminate the charge. A parasitic load confuses the charger.

    Charge at a moderate temperature. Do not charge below freezing.

    Lithium-ion does not need to be fully charged; a partial charge is better.

    Chargers use different methods for “ready” indication. The light signal may not always indicate a full charge.

    Discontinue using charger and/or battery if the battery gets excessively warm.

    Before prolonged storage, apply some charge to bring the pack to about half charge.

    Over-discharged batteries can be “boosted” to life again. Discard pack if the voltage does not rise to a normal level within a minute while on boost.
    2
    I usually charge my phone whenever I get the chance to do so. I'm constantly on my One X to check work email and reply to comments on my work social media sites from customers. On top of that, I also lead a very 'healthy' online personal lifestyle; as my close families are on it.

    To be out of battery is always a dreadful situation, for me. This I why I charge my phone whenever I'm not using it. After a few years of doing the same, with an iPhone and a Desire V, I find that the battery is still charging strong and have never yet failed me. This is what I usually do with my phone.

    Sent from my HTC One X using Tapatalk 2
    1
    All well and good, but ours are li-ion in the one x
    1
    Here are some more reading material for those who are interested in learning about Li-Poly batteries.:


    According to those guides its always better to do partial discharges and charge before the battry goes completely dead. That way you can prolong the lifetime of your battery. As a habit I normally don’t let my batteries discharge below 30% if I can help it. My previous Galaxy S used to have about 40% charge at the end of the day. I’m yet to buy a HTC One X, but hope it won’t fully discharge by the end of the day. Since One X doesn’t have a removable battery prolonging the life time is critical.
    1
    After reading all of that information I don't let mine go below half and the battery seems to be doing really good. The thing that caught my eye was on another site where they use the same type of battery in radio controlled airplanes is that you get about 500-600 full cycles with these types of batteries, but if you don't let it drain all the way it isn't considered a full cycle. So it would also seem the battery life would last longer and they also said not to use the phone while charging if possible, turn it off and charge.