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[GUIDE] Android 12 Update and Root **READ THE NOTES**

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Skeetch79

Senior Member
Oct 29, 2010
315
203
West Milford, NJ
I had the same problem with Magisk 23010 - Navy Federal app wouldn't even start. Universal SafeteyNet Fix is not updated for 23010 yet, CTS profile still fails, so Safetynet won't pass. I ended up downgrading to 23001, and it's working fine.

Which version of Magisk are you using?

I would try this:
  1. Remove Magisk - restore images first, then Complete Uninstall. Let the phone reboot.
  2. Re install Magisk (I used 23001). Re patch boot image.
  3. Reboot to bootloader, flash the patched boot images to both slots:
    fastboot flash --slot=all boot magisk-boot.img
    ***OR***
    Boot the patched image:
    fastboot boot magisk-boot.img
  4. Launch Magisk again and check for root. If you booted the image instead of flashing it, you can now perform Direct Install in Magisk.
I prefer to use the second method, because it allows me to test a patched image while still having a good image in /boot; if everything works, I can then just directly install Magisk to /boot without flashing.

The same process works for 23010 if you want to use the newest version of Magisk, although it's more difficult to get Safetynet to pass.

Both verity and verification must be disabled; if you did that, then yes you should be able to flash the patched image.
I am using version 23000 - the link you provided is for a zip file. Can this be renamed to apk and installed as an app? (or do you have a link to v23001 as an apk?)

Thank you for the method suggestions - I am leaning towards the second method. Do I need to uninstall Magisk, restore the images and then reinstall Magisk if I go with Method 2 or can I simply boot using the patched boot image?
 
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I am using version 23000 - the link you provided is for a zip file. Can this be renamed to apk and installed as an app? (or do you have a link to v23001 as an apk?)
Yes, just rename it as an apk and install it.

I'd much rather be able to get it straight from John Wu's Github, but it appears he has either removed or made private all of the older Canary builds.
Thank you for the method suggestions - I am leaning towards the second method. Do I need to uninstall Magisk, restore the images and then reinstall Magisk if I go with Method 2 or can I simply boot using the patched boot image?
I'm not sure I understand your question. I ran into a similar issue as you with a banking app that was crashing, I assume due to CTS fail, so I decided to downgrade to an older Canary version of Magisk, which I discovered is more complicated than one would think.

When you restore images in the Magsik app, it removes root from the boot images, so after reboot you lose root. The second half is removing everything Magisk related (Complete uninstall) because simply uninstalling the app via the Android app manager doesn't clean everything up, and you'll run into issues with being unable to use root.

So, what I'm saying is, remove Magisk completely, which will restore the stock boot image. Magisk will reboot the phone, at which point both Magisk and root will be gone. Then, install the older version, use it to patch the boot image manually (Select and Patch a File), copy the boot image back to your computer and either flash it or boot it. Either way, you should boot into rooted Android, and if you chose to boot instead of flash, you can then use Magisk to directly patch /boot.

Then, use Magisk Hide + Riru + Universal SafetyNet Fix, and you should be able to get a SafetyNet pass.

Hope this helps.
 

Skeetch79

Senior Member
Oct 29, 2010
315
203
West Milford, NJ
Yes, just rename it as an apk and install it.

I'd much rather be able to get it straight from John Wu's Github, but it appears he has either removed or made private all of the older Canary builds.

I'm not sure I understand your question. I ran into a similar issue as you with a banking app that was crashing, I assume due to CTS fail, so I decided to downgrade to an older Canary version of Magisk, which I discovered is more complicated than one would think.

When you restore images in the Magsik app, it removes root from the boot images, so after reboot you lose root. The second half is removing everything Magisk related (Complete uninstall) because simply uninstalling the app via the Android app manager doesn't clean everything up, and you'll run into issues with being unable to use root.

So, what I'm saying is, remove Magisk completely, which will restore the stock boot image. Magisk will reboot the phone, at which point both Magisk and root will be gone. Then, install the older version, use it to patch the boot image manually (Select and Patch a File), copy the boot image back to your computer and either flash it or boot it. Either way, you should boot into rooted Android, and if you chose to boot instead of flash, you can then use Magisk to directly patch /boot.

Then, use Magisk Hide + Riru + Universal SafetyNet Fix, and you should be able to get a SafetyNet pass.

Hope this helps.
Apologies if my question wasn't clear.

Hopefully to clarify:
- Can I install Magisk 23001, patch the stock boot image, reboot into Android using the patched boot image and then install Magisk and gain permanent root
-or-
- do I have to completely uninstall Magisk, restore the stock Pixel 5 images, install Magisk 23001, patch the stock boot image, boot with the patched boot file and then install Magisk for root?

Difference between the two: do not restore stock images or restore stock images.

How do I completely uninstall Magisk? Is this via computer? I am running a PC with Windows 10.
 
Apologies if my question wasn't clear.

Hopefully to clarify:
- Can I install Magisk 23001, patch the stock boot image, reboot into Android using the patched boot image and then install Magisk and gain permanent root
-or-
- do I have to completely uninstall Magisk, restore the stock Pixel 5 images, install Magisk 23001, patch the stock boot image, boot with the patched boot file and then install Magisk for root?

Difference between the two: do not restore stock images or restore stock images.

How do I completely uninstall Magisk? Is this via computer? I am running a PC with Windows 10.
Here's the link for the actual APK from Github.

When you uninstall Magisk from within the app, it restores the boot images for you; you don't have to do that manually.

You need to be familiar with Android Platform Tools (adb and fastboot), as well as where to get the factory image for your device, how to extract files, and how to copy them to/from your phone.
Here's some more detailed instructions:

  1. Launch Magisk. Tap Uninstall, then Restore Images. Once it finishes, go back to Uninstall, then Complete Uninstall. Let it reboot your phone.
  2. You will boot into unrooted Android without Magisk. Install 23001.
  3. If you haven't already, download the Android 12 factory zip. Extract boot.img and copy it to your phone.
  4. Launch Magisk, then tap Install, then Select and Patch a File. Patch the boot.img you just copied to your phone. Copy the magsik_patched-23001_xxxxx.img back to your computer.
  5. Reboot to bootloader (I use ADB to do this:)
    [code[adb reboot bootloader[/code]
  6. Flash the patched boot image:
    Code:
    fastboot flash --slot=all boot magisk_patched-23001_xxxxx.img
    ***OR***
    Boot the patched image: (I like to do it this way)
    Code:
    fastboot boot magisk_patched-23001_xxxxx.img
  7. If you flashed the patched image, you're done.
  8. If you booted the patched image, launch Magisk, then tap Install, then Direct Install.
 

Skeetch79

Senior Member
Oct 29, 2010
315
203
West Milford, NJ
Here's the link for the actual APK from Github.

When you uninstall Magisk from within the app, it restores the boot images for you; you don't have to do that manually.

You need to be familiar with Android Platform Tools (adb and fastboot), as well as where to get the factory image for your device, how to extract files, and how to copy them to/from your phone.
Here's some more detailed instructions:

  1. Launch Magisk. Tap Uninstall, then Restore Images. Once it finishes, go back to Uninstall, then Complete Uninstall. Let it reboot your phone.
  2. You will boot into unrooted Android without Magisk. Install 23001.
  3. If you haven't already, download the Android 12 factory zip. Extract boot.img and copy it to your phone.
  4. Launch Magisk, then tap Install, then Select and Patch a File. Patch the boot.img you just copied to your phone. Copy the magsik_patched-23001_xxxxx.img back to your computer.
  5. Reboot to bootloader (I use ADB to do this:)
    [code[adb reboot bootloader[/code]
  6. Flash the patched boot image:
    Code:
    fastboot flash --slot=all boot magisk_patched-23001_xxxxx.img
    ***OR***
    Boot the patched image: (I like to do it this way)
    Code:
    fastboot boot magisk_patched-23001_xxxxx.img
  7. If you flashed the patched image, you're done.
  8. If you booted the patched image, launch Magisk, then tap Install, then Direct Install.
Thank you sir! You are a god send!

I reflashed the stock images, patched the boot file with the magisk 23001, rebooted into fastboot and flashed to both slots! rocking root now!!!

Thank you again !
 
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An excellent point that was brought up from a Pixel 6 user:

Data wipe is required for permanent root after upgrading to Android 12. That much we know.

But what about a device that had an original clean install of Android 12?

Who here wiped when upgrading to Android 12, and did not reflash vbmeta until AFTER you set up your device?
Basically, we need to determine if it matters when you flash vbmeta. Here's what needs to be tested:
- Factory flash Android 12 with a wipe; do NOT disable verity and verification
- Set up and use your device
- After everything is set up (download all your apps) attempt to reflash vbmeta with verity and verification disabled, as well as a patched boot image.

If this is successful, this means we shouldn't have to wipe every time we take a monthly update.
 
Last edited:

rbouza1

Senior Member
May 16, 2013
666
157
midland
Google Pixel 6
Yes. It's all up to a matter of preference - you can either boot the rooted image then direct patch through Magisk, or you can just flash it since you have to start from bootloader anyway.
Seems less risky when booting with the img and opposed to flashing it. I only need root to move my clock to the right lol. AdAway works via VPN, Vance YouTube is ad free.
 

thomas.raines

Recognized Developer
Jun 23, 2011
2,154
3,899
Hutto
The proper way to upgrade while retaining data is to use the OTA.
I know this may see like a dumb quesiton coming from a dev that's been around for a while, but by OTA, do you mean settings>system update>check for updates (mine phone always says up to date). I dl the updates straight from the factory images site where I have 2 options: Flash or Link. Is the "Flash" option an OTA? I've never tried that one in fear it will wipe data...
 
I know this may see like a dumb quesiton coming from a dev that's been around for a while, but by OTA, do you mean settings>system update>check for updates (mine phone always says up to date). I dl the updates straight from the factory images site where I have 2 options: Flash or Link. Is the "Flash" option an OTA? I've never tried that one in fear it will wipe data...
The Flash link takes you to the Android Flash Tool. It's pretty damn cool if you've never used it before. It essentially performs the factory flash via ADB through your browser...but you can select options like relocking your bootloader, wiping data, disabling verity/verification, force flash all partitions, etc. Basically a web GUI alternative for using ADB command line.

By OTA, I mean either the automatic update, or ADB sideload. I believe you -can- dirty flash the Android 12 update over Android 11, but this is not advisable.

The issue we are currently having is being able to retain data *and* root after the update. So far, it seems that in order to root on Android 12, you have to start with a clean install, even if you took the OTA update. Factory reset (data wipe) counts as a clean install.

One user, @HumorBaby ,was able to upgrade from 12 Beta to the stable release without wiping data by sideloading the OTA, but skipping reboot before flashing vbmeta. However, it should be noted that he started with a clean install with the 12 Beta.
 

jnss98b

Senior Member
The Flash link takes you to the Android Flash Tool. It's pretty damn cool if you've never used it before. It essentially performs the factory flash via ADB through your browser...but you can select options like relocking your bootloader, wiping data, disabling verity/verification, force flash all partitions, etc. Basically a web GUI alternative for using ADB command line.

By OTA, I mean either the automatic update, or ADB sideload. I believe you -can- dirty flash the Android 12 update over Android 11, but this is not advisable.

The issue we are currently having is being able to retain data *and* root after the update. So far, it seems that in order to root on Android 12, you have to start with a clean install, even if you took the OTA update. Factory reset (data wipe) counts as a clean install.

One user, @HumorBaby ,was able to upgrade from 12 Beta to the stable release without wiping data by sideloading the OTA, but skipping reboot before flashing vbmeta. However, it should be noted that he started with a clean install with the 12 Beta.
Oh wait so I'm rooted on Android 11 right now and I can just accept the on device OTA without losing data but only lose root? I'm planning to just root through booting the patched image so I can just update to Android 12 straight through the settings app?
 

thomas.raines

Recognized Developer
Jun 23, 2011
2,154
3,899
Hutto
The Flash link takes you to the Android Flash Tool. It's pretty damn cool if you've never used it before. It essentially performs the factory flash via ADB through your browser...but you can select options like relocking your bootloader, wiping data, disabling verity/verification, force flash all partitions, etc. Basically a web GUI alternative for using ADB command line.

By OTA, I mean either the automatic update, or ADB sideload. I believe you -can- dirty flash the Android 12 update over Android 11, but this is not advisable.

The issue we are currently having is being able to retain data *and* root after the update. So far, it seems that in order to root on Android 12, you have to start with a clean install, even if you took the OTA update. Factory reset (data wipe) counts as a clean install.

One user, @HumorBaby ,was able to upgrade from 12 Beta to the stable release without wiping data by sideloading the OTA, but skipping reboot before flashing vbmeta. However, it should be noted that he started with a clean install with the 12 Beta.
Thank you. Unfortunately for me, I have never any the OTA updates and have had to manually update my phone. I'm going to try the Android Flash Tool to update to 12.
 
I would like to recognize @ipdev for finding this:
To add to V0latyle's post.

Pixel 4a [sunfish] has no issue updating and installing Magisk on Android 12.

The issue starts with Pixel 4a (5G) [bramble].
This is also the first Pixel using Boot Header v3.
Boot image header, version 3 - source.android - Link
Vendor boot header - source.android - Link

The 3, 3a, and 4 series along with 4a are using header v2.

4a (5G), 5 and 5a are using header v3.

Just downloaded and checked.
6 and 6 Pro are using header v4.

I am not sure if that is the problem but, it is quite a distinguishing line between Pixels that have this issue with Magisk and those that do not on Android 12. 🙃

After a little more testing on my 5 [redfin], I will open an issue on GitHub.
Magisk - GitHub - Issues - Link

Cheers all. :cowboy:
We still don't know if this has something to do with our issue, but there's a huge chance it does.
 

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  • 5
    Or he/you could add this to it when flashing factory image via ADB only. Why? Because it works on the pixel 4a 5(G) and may work on the Pixel 5. It would not confuse anyone, just provide another less complicated option for upgrading/updating those phones. Seems pretty black and white to me.
    Agreed.

    The confusion arises from this:
    PS :
    Pixel 4a 5(G) phone owners need to know for the initial upgrade (Android 11 to Android 12), they do not need the fastboot flash --disable-verity --disable-verification --slot-all vbmeta vbmeta.img step in this case
    This implies that verity and verification need not be disabled when upgrading from Android 11...which if you want permanent root, is not true. This can be omitted if one flashes the factory image, as they can incorporate the flags into the command:
    Code:
    fastboot update -w --disable-verity --disable-verification image-device-buildnumber.zip
    However, if the update is performed via the OTA, then vbmeta must be specifically disabled.

    If you understand what he is saying, why not add the Pixel 4a 5(G) note to the Reminders?
    This is true across ALL affected devices - Pixels on the SD765G and Tensor. It is not specific to one device.

    Still, I will update the notes for the sake of clarity.
    3
    I'm not clear on why there is a focus on the OTA update.

    Since I've been rooting Pixels, I flash the factory image via adb. One has to use adb anyway to root after the update.

    Based on the recent discussion, it seems like the most straight-forward path is to flash the factory image and add the disable verity and disable verification lines to the flash-all script.

    After update, then root.

    What an I missing?
    Nothing, you're exactly correct.
    Code:
    fastboot update --disable-verity --disable-verification image-redfin-buildnumber.zip
    Allow update to complete including a reboot. Patch boot.img after the update, then reboot to bootloader and flash.
    3
    Then I'm confused about the need to wipe.

    If I uninstall magisk, restore the original boot image to A11, then flash A12 factory image, remove -w but add the disable flags, I'm then on A12 unrooted.

    Install magisk, patch boot image, flash patched image.

    I'm then rooted on A12 without wiping, yes?

    Again, what am I missing?

    I don't understand the need to wipe in this scenario.
    Read the OP, please. It's been explained thoroughly. If you try flash a patched boot image on stock A12, on the 765G and Tensor devices, bootloader will reject your boot image:
    failed to load/verify boot images
    To fix this, you have to reflash vbmeta:
    Code:
    fastboot flash vbmeta --disable-verity --disable-verification vbmeta.img
    If you have not wiped, and AVB was not already disabled, this will result in booting into recovery (Rescue Party) telling you your data is corrupted with the option to try again or factory reset.

    Meaning: A wipe is required when you upgrade from Android 11. A wipe is required when you root the first time on Android 12. A wipe will also be required if you let the phone boot after forgetting to disable verity and verification.

    I have an untested idea that one could try and disable vbmeta while still on A11, then dirty flash the A12 image also disabling vbmeta...but as far as I know this will require a data wipe as well.
    3
    On that note, has anyone on A11 October tried either:

    - Flashing just vbmeta from A11 Oct full system image, using the disable flags, then tried a dirty flash of A12 Nov FSI, also with disable flags

    -or-

    - Dirty flash A11 Oct FSI over the same installed A11 Oct using the disabled flags, then dirty flash A12 Nov FSI

    Wondering if either would avoid the necessity of the system wipe with the first install of A12 FSI in order to be able to then flash modified boot images with success.

    If nobody's done it yet or knows for certain it wouldn't work I may go guinea pig and try it. *May not be for a bit yet, but as soon as I have a day of life buffer to deal with possible issues and restores, there's really nothing to lose as currently I have to wipe anyhow.*
    3
    Universal SafetyNet Fix 2.2.0 is out for public access; this version has been ported to Zygisk.
  • 18
    WARNING: PERMANENT ROOT WHEN UPGRADING FROM ANDROID 11 REQUIRES A DATA WIPE! THERE IS CURRENTLY NO WAY AROUND THIS.


    WARNING: MANUALLY INSTALLING FACTORY UPDATES OR IMAGES REQUIRES AN UNLOCKED BOOTLOADER. If your bootloader is locked, DO NOT ATTEMPT THIS.

    WARNING: MODIFY YOUR DEVICE AT YOUR OWN RISK. YOU ALONE WILL BE RESPONSIBLE FOR MALFUNCTION, DAMAGE, OR LOSS OF ANY KIND IF SOMETHING GOES WRONG.

    Root will be done via Magisk. If you aren't already using it, download and install to your phone.

    Warning: For the sake of simplicity, I frequently will use generalizations when referring to files ("[patched boot image]" instead of "magisk_patched-23001_xxxxx.img" for example). It is YOUR RESPONSIBILITY to ensure you are flashing the correct file. The easiest way to do this is type the command in the command line without the file itself, then drag and drop the file you want to flash into the command line window.



    For those of you with a locked bootloader:

    Simply install the update as usual via OTA, whether automatically through Android Update, or manually via adb sideload.

    First, a bit of information on why you need to follow this guide (See this post)

    Two new Verified Boot features implemented in Android 12 will interfere with attempts to root. A more detailed explanation is below if you would like.

    Dm-verity (device-mapper-verity) is a method by which an image on block devices (the underlying storage layer of the file system) can be checked to determine if it matches an expected configuration, using a cryptographic hash tree. If the hash doesn't match, dm-verity prevents the stored code from loading.

    Vbmeta verification is the other half of this - it provides a cryptographically signed reference hash which is used to verify the integrity of /boot, /system, and /vendor partitions. The vbmeta image is only used to verify /boot, while vbmeta-system is used to verify /system.

    This was implemented to prevent persistent rootkits by means of a hardware level security check, to prevent "potentially harmful applications" such as Magisk from evading detection, as such applications residing within the kernel will have higher privileges than the detection applications.

    What this means is that with these two enabled, a modified boot image will cause a verification error when flashed to the device, preventing boot. Interestingly, this check is not performed against "live" boot images loaded via ADB, so with dm-verity and vbmeta verification enabled, a modified image can be booted as long as the image in /boot is intact.

    The good news is, disabling these features is as easy as using a command switch.
    The bad news, however, is that /data must be clean the first time this is done.


    If you update via automatic OTA: THIS WILL REQUIRE A WIPE EVERY TIME!
    1. Download the factory image (Yes, this is required) to your computer. Connect your device via USB.
    2. Extract the contents of the factory image, then extract both boot.img and vbmeta.img from the image-[device].zip (where [device] is the codename for your device, such as Redfin for Pixel 5
    2. Reboot to bootloader: With device connected via USB, Developer Options enabled and USB Debugging enabled, reboot to bootloader using ADB:
    Code:
    adb reboot bootloader
    3. Continue to Reflash vbmeta below

    To manually install the OTA:
    1. Download the OTA for your device, as well as the factory image (Yes, you need both) to your computer.
    2. Install the OTA
    3. Extract the contents of the factory image, then extract both boot.img and vbmeta.img from the image-[device].zip (where [device] is the codename for your device, such as Redfin for Pixel 5
    4. Let the update complete, and IMMEDIATELY reboot to bootloader.
    5. Continue to Reflash vbmeta below

    Reflash VBmeta
    1. Reflash vbmeta with dm-verity and boot verification disabled:
    Code:
    fastboot --disable-verity --disable-verification flash --slot=all vbmeta vbmeta.img
    2. If this is the first time you are rooting Android 12, you will end up in Recovery with this message: "Can't load Android system. Your data may be corrupt." You will have to perform the factory reset to continue. Once complete, let the device boot Android.
    3. If you have previously wiped and are updating, let the device boot Android.
    Continue to Patch Boot Image below.

    1. Open this link in Google Chrome (DO NOT USE MICROSOFT EDGE OR MOZILLA FIREFOX) Here is the link for beta
    2. Connect your device via USB (make sure USB Debugging is enabled)
    3. Enable ADB access in the browser
    4. Select your device
    5. Select the Android 12 build
    6. IMPORTANT: Click the pencil icon next to the selected build
    7. Ensure Wipe Device, Disable Verification, and Disable Verity are checked. DATA WIPE IS REQUIRED when updating from an older version of Android. Don't lock your bootloader if you want root. Force flash all partitions should not be necessary (but use this if you've run into problems and are starting over). Skip Secondary and Force Debuggable should be unchecked, unless you want to use ADB for root access on the stock kernel for some reason.
    8. Click Install Build.
    9. Wait until the update finishes, including a reboot to Android.
    10. Continue to Patch Boot Image below.

    1. Download the factory image to your computer and connect your device via USB, with USB debugging enabled.
    2. Extract the contents of the factory ZIP
    3. Reboot to bootloader:
    Code:
    adb reboot bootloader
    4. If necessary, update the bootloader: WARNING: IF DONE INCORRECTLY THIS WILL BRICK YOUR DEVICE!
    Code:
    fastboot flash bootloader [bootloader image]
    Reboot back to bootloader.
    5. If necessary, update the radio:
    Code:
    fastboot flash radio [radio image]
    Reboot to bootloader.
    6. Install the update:
    Code:
    fastboot --disable-verity --disable-verification -w update [factory image zip]
    DATA WIPE IS REQUIRED when updating from an older version of Android.
    7. Let the update complete, including a reboot to Android
    8. Continue to Patch Boot Image below

    1. Extract boot.img from the factory image ZIP if you haven't done so already
    2. Install Magisk on your phone
    3. Move the boot image to your phone via USB, and patch it using "Select and Patch a File" in Magisk
    4. Move the patched boot image back to your PC
    5. Reboot to bootloader
    6. Flash the patched boot image:
    Code:
    fastboot flash boot [patched boot image]
    7. Reboot to system.

    For subsequent updates to Android 12:
    DO NOT USE AUTOMATIC UPDATE! DO NOT LET THE DEVICE BOOT BEFORE YOU DISABLE VERITY AND VERIFICATION!

    Follow the same directions as above, except you don't have to wipe.

    Key reminders:
    * The OTA does not have a way to set the disable flags for vbmeta, so if you update via OTA, you will have to reflash vbmeta with the disable flags every time you update.
    * The most critical thing to remember is that once you have disabled verified boot and gained permanent root, YOU MUST NOT let the device boot into Android if /vbmeta is flashed without disabling verity and verification.
    * If you forget to do this and let the device boot into Android, you will end up in Rescue Party: Recovery Mode screen with the message "Can't load Android system. Your data may be corrupt." YOU WILL HAVE TO WIPE TO GET ROOT BACK.



    If you run into problems, or just want to share your results, please feel free to post your method and results in this thread.
    6
    Who is calling you stupid?!?! It's an American expression: for example, your costume is ruined by rain, so, you say: it's the weather stupid.

    Anyway, I am trying to help, so, there is no reason to seek insults where there isn't one.
    It's just the way you worded it is all. I am born in America, and actually thought the same thing when I read it.
    It's confusing to me though..

    I would say, not "it's the weather, stupid"
    but rather
    "it's the stupid weather"

    so reading "It's the bootloader stupid"
    I feel should be,
    "it the stupid bootloader"

    but thank you for clearing up that you aren't passing insults.
    And it's hard to tell through text whose being argumentative, and whose being helpful.
    Glad you're the latter.
    5
    Or he/you could add this to it when flashing factory image via ADB only. Why? Because it works on the pixel 4a 5(G) and may work on the Pixel 5. It would not confuse anyone, just provide another less complicated option for upgrading/updating those phones. Seems pretty black and white to me.
    Agreed.

    The confusion arises from this:
    PS :
    Pixel 4a 5(G) phone owners need to know for the initial upgrade (Android 11 to Android 12), they do not need the fastboot flash --disable-verity --disable-verification --slot-all vbmeta vbmeta.img step in this case
    This implies that verity and verification need not be disabled when upgrading from Android 11...which if you want permanent root, is not true. This can be omitted if one flashes the factory image, as they can incorporate the flags into the command:
    Code:
    fastboot update -w --disable-verity --disable-verification image-device-buildnumber.zip
    However, if the update is performed via the OTA, then vbmeta must be specifically disabled.

    If you understand what he is saying, why not add the Pixel 4a 5(G) note to the Reminders?
    This is true across ALL affected devices - Pixels on the SD765G and Tensor. It is not specific to one device.

    Still, I will update the notes for the sake of clarity.
    4
    For those of you who have not yet wiped data and are using unrooted Android 12:

    As long as your system boots, you should be able to live boot a patched boot image and use that for temporary root:

    fastboot boot patched_boot.img

    If you are currently stuck at the "corrupted data" message in recovery, try sideloading the OTA or dirty flashing the factory image (with NO FLAGS). If that doesn't work, the only fix that I know of that works is to perform a factory reset...but if you get to that point, you might as well clean flash the factory image with both --disable flags:

    fastboot --disable-verity --disable-verification -w update redfin_image.zip

    at which point you should be able to flash and boot the patched boot image.
    4
    Who is calling you stupid?!?! It's an American expression: for example, your costume is ruined by rain, so, you say: it's the weather stupid.

    Anyway, I am trying to help, so, there is no reason to seek insults where there isn't one.
    I didn't seek one, I guess I misunderstood. I have never heard of that expression before, at least not in that context. I'm American too, and I've generally heard it like this:

    "Hey, what's making that howling noise?"
    "It's the wind, stupid!"

    I digress.

    I'll have to pick this up later; it's late, my wife is demanding....attention, and I want to enjoy the weekend.