[GUIDE] Pixel 5 "redfin": Unlock Bootloader, Update, Root, Pass SafetyNet

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cubandanger05

Senior Member
Dec 22, 2009
531
168
OnePlus 5T
Google Pixel 5
Your point is moot. I've always used the factory image as well, although I don't disable dm-verity or vbmeta verification, and I've never had any issues.

The majority of issues with updating seem to be associated with the OTA, and since many users still prefer to update that way, I posted the notice.
I understand, not need for us to get excited over it.
 

andybones

Forum Moderator
Staff member
May 18, 2010
15,009
15,346
Google Pixel 5
Your point is moot. I've always used the factory image as well, although I don't disable dm-verity or vbmeta verification, and I've never had any issues.

The majority of issues with updating seem to be associated with the OTA, and since many users still prefer to update that way, I posted the notice.
+1, been on A12 for a little over a month. Same method I used for A11 has worked for me. I always choose to manually update using factory image. Worked great from June to July build.
Thank you for the great guide, my friend!
 

AtrixHDMan

Senior Member
Mar 3, 2015
726
118
Can someone help me.Pixel 5 with running lasted Android 11 with magisk I installed and can't see all apps in Play Store.
 

andybones

Forum Moderator
Staff member
May 18, 2010
15,009
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Google Pixel 5
Are you guys using Magisk beta or Magisk canary?
And which do you prefer.

I've been using canary, but I've considered switching up for beta 25.2
However, canary has everything that beta does, so is it worth it?

Also how would I switch?
Uninstall Magisk, in the Magisk app, uninstall the app, reboot
Install Magisk beta 25.2, patch and flash the kernek?

Thank you, sorry if this is a bit off key.
 

V0latyle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Are you guys using Magisk beta or Magisk canary?
And which do you prefer.

I've been using canary, but I've considered switching up for beta 25.2
However, canary has everything that beta does, so is it worth it?

Also how would I switch?
Uninstall Magisk, in the Magisk app, uninstall the app, reboot
Install Magisk beta 25.2, patch and flash the kernek?

Thank you, sorry if this is a bit off key.
I've been using Canary.

Switching from beta to canary is as simple as installing the app. However, since canary is usually a newer version than the beta (current 25201 vs 25200), you'd need to uninstall Canary, then install Beta. If you want to re-patch the kernel with Beta, then you'd need to perform a complete uninstall within Magisk, then boot with a rooted image and perform Direct Install once you've installed the beta. However, it's not really necessary to re-patch the kernel if it's working.

Alternatively, you could change the update channel in Canary to Stable or Beta, which means you wouldn't get an update until there's a new release on those channels. This would probably be the cleanest and most foolproof way to do it.
 
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andybones

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May 18, 2010
15,009
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Google Pixel 5
I've been using Canary.

Switching from beta to canary is as simple as installing the app. However, since canary is usually a newer version than the beta (current 25201 vs 25200), you'd need to uninstall Canary, then install Beta. If you want to re-patch the kernel with Beta, then you'd need to perform a complete uninstall within Magisk, then boot with a rooted image and perform Direct Install once you've installed the beta. However, it's not really necessary to re-patch the kernel if it's working.

Alternatively, you could change the update channel in Canary to Stable or Beta, which means you wouldn't get an update until there's a new release on those channels. This would probably be the cleanest and most foolproof way to do it.
Thank you my good Sir.
I believe I'll stick with the Canary.
Everything is working wonderfully, though I may need to do a factory reset for the August factory image because Now Playing just won't download the database fully.. it still does find songs.. sometimes, others I need to manually hit the lock screen icon, but it's very annoying to say the least.
I also pulled a very noob move and disabled all trackers in the Warden app without backing them up, thus some apps aren't sending me notifications anymore.
Sorry for the last off topic things, just angry that I goofed lol.
 
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V0latyle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Thank you my good Sir.
I believe I'll stick with the Canary.
Everything is working wonderfully, though I may need to do a factory reset for the August factory image because Now Playing just won't download the database fully.. it still does find songs.. sometimes, others I need to manually hit the lock screen icon, but it's very annoying to say the least.
I also pulled a very noob move and disabled all trackers in the Warden app without backing them up, thus some apps aren't sending me notifications anymore.
Sorry for the last off topic things, just angry that I goofed lol.
Relevant

Looks like Beta and Canary are pretty much the same. Debug builds are only for developers. Canary channel immediately incorporates changes that will be implemented in the next public channel release.
 
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Regys

Senior Member
Sep 10, 2012
209
12
Hi,

The August update is not released ?

When will version 13 be released ?

thx !
 

xsR1zU

New member
Jun 14, 2010
4
4
Welp...

I just attempted to update to A13 using the OTA method, and bootlooped back to Android 12.

However, I had no trouble installing the factory image.
I presume that because the OTA method has been added as one of the update options in this guide, it must mean that other people have had success with it in the recent past -- Is that true? It's never worked for me. (But my last attempt was 6/8/22 with Magisk 25.001 canary.)

I'll share my update method that I've used with success the past couple updates (including today when updating to A13):
  1. In Magisk: restore the stock boot image, but don't reboot. That way, you continue to have root, but it won't interfere with the OTA update process. I usually do this a day or two before I expect an update to be released.
  2. Wait for the OTA update to become available. When available, proceed with installation. When complete, do NOT click the reboot button.
  3. Grab a copy of the new stock boot image that has been installed as part of the update. You can do this because you still have root. You don't have to wait for the update to be complete before doing this -- just wait at least until the update says that it is "optimizing" your system. By that time, the boot image will have already been updated. Start a shell in Termux and do the following:
    1. You need to know which slot (a or b) is your current active slot, and then grab the image from the other slot. The active slot can be found with:

      $ su
      # getprop | grep slot
      [cache_key.telephony.get_slot_index]: [80256431924873534]
      [persist.vendor.mdm.slot.sw]: [UIMDRV,slot_1]
      [persist.vendor.mdm.slot.swtime]: [2021-06-05 21:18:02]
      [ro.boot.slot_retry_count]: [0]
      [ro.boot.slot_successful]: [no]
      [ro.boot.slot_suffix]: [_b]
      #

    2. Seeing in the example above that the current slot is "_b", copy the boot image from the inactive slot (in this example, slot _a) to the sdcard:

      # cp /dev/block/by-name/boot_a /sdcard/
  4. Use Magisk to patch the stock boot image that was copied to /sdcard/boot_a
  5. Move the patched image to your computer.
  6. You are now ready to go back to the system update screen and click the reboot button. The system will do a few more housekeeping items, then the screen will clear and "rebooting..." will appear.
  7. When the system says "rebooting...", press the power button and the vol. down button simultaneously so that it boots into the bootloader (fastboot). (If pressed too quickly, it may instead capture a screen shot -- just release the buttons and press again.)
  8. Use fastboot on your computer to boot the new patched boot image:

    fastboot boot <magisk-patched-boot-image>

  9. The system will boot up into the newly updated OTA version. You will still have root, but the boot image on the phone will still be stock. Go into Magisk and use the 'direct install' method to patch the boot image on the phone. Once patched, Magisk will then present a reboot button for clicking. Rebooting at that point is unnecessary -- you are already running a patched boot image.
The advanages of the above method is that you don't have to download a large factory image and extract the stock boot image out of it, nor do you have to flash the factory image, all of which takes time. Instead, you are just letting the OTA process handle the downloading/installing (which can proceed unattended). Furthermore, the OTA download is likely to be much smaller in most cases -- the July OTA update was only 18 MB (although in the case of the OTA for A13, it was rather large at 835 MB). A smaller download means that it will install more quickly.
 
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V0latyle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
I presume that because the OTA method has been added as one of the update options in this guide, it must mean that other people have had success with it in the recent past -- Is that true? It's never worked for me. (But my last attempt was 6/8/22 with Magisk 25.001 canary.)
It's worked before on Android 12. It seems most people upgrading to 13 are experiencing boot loops when they either sideload the OTA or use the automatic install.
I'll share my update method that I've used with success the past couple updates (including today when updating to A13):
  1. In Magisk: restore the stock boot image, but don't reboot. That way, you continue to have root, but it won't interfere with the OTA update process. I usually do this a day or two before I expect an update to be released.
  2. Wait for the OTA update to become available. When available, proceed with installation. When complete, do NOT click the reboot button.
  3. Grab a copy of the new stock boot image that has been installed as part of the update. You can do this because you still have root. You don't have to wait for the update to be complete before doing this -- just wait at least until the update says that it is "optimizing" your system. By that time, the boot image will have already been updated. Start a shell in Termux and do the following:
    1. You need to know which slot (a or b) is your current active slot, and then grab the image from the other slot. The active slot can be found with:

      $ su
      # getprop | grep slot
      [cache_key.telephony.get_slot_index]: [80256431924873534]
      [persist.vendor.mdm.slot.sw]: [UIMDRV,slot_1]
      [persist.vendor.mdm.slot.swtime]: [2021-06-05 21:18:02]
      [ro.boot.slot_retry_count]: [0]
      [ro.boot.slot_successful]: [no]
      [ro.boot.slot_suffix]: [_b]
      #

    2. Seeing in the example above that the current slot is "_b", copy the boot image from the inactive slot (in this example, slot _a) to the sdcard:

      # cp /dev/block/by-name/boot_a /sdcard/
  4. Use Magisk to patch the stock boot image that was copied to /sdcard/boot_a
  5. Move the patched image to your computer.
  6. You are now ready to go back to the system update screen and click the reboot button. The system will do a few more housekeeping items, then the screen will clear and "rebooting..." will appear.
  7. When the system says "rebooting...", press the power button and the vol. down button simultaneously so that it boots into the bootloader (fastboot). (If pressed too quickly, it may instead capture a screen shot -- just release the buttons and press again.)
  8. Use fastboot on your computer to boot the new patched boot image:

    fastboot boot <magisk-patched-boot-image>

  9. The system will boot up into the newly updated OTA version. You will still have root, but the boot image on the phone will still be stock. Go into Magisk and use the 'direct install' method to patch the boot image on the phone. Once patched, Magisk will then present a reboot button for clicking. Rebooting at that point is unnecessary -- you are already running a patched boot image.
The advantages of the above method is that you don't have to download a large factory image and extract the stock boot image out of it, nor do you have to flash the factory image, all of which takes time. Instead, you are just letting the OTA process handle the downloading/installing (which can proceed unattended). Furthermore, the OTA download is likely to be much smaller in most cases -- the July OTA update was only 18 MB (although in the case of the OTA for A13, it was rather large at 835 MB). A smaller download means that it will install more quickly.
TBH I've found it much more time consuming to apply the OTA update, because the system has to parse, extract, and write the contents of the OTA package. On a high speed Wi-Fi connection it took about 10 minutes to download the OTA yesterday, then another 20ish to attempt to perform the update...which ended up failing anyway.

When I got home, I updated using the factory image, which took me all of 5 minutes tops.

Interesting that you were able to successfully update and root using the OTA. Others are experiencing boot loops.
 

Regys

Senior Member
Sep 10, 2012
209
12
Hi,

Why version 13 is dated 220624 (TP1A.220624.014, Aug 2022) ?

So the update can be done without worry in Factory Images ?
 

eriks0n

Member
Oct 15, 2015
14
2
It's worked before on Android 12. It seems most people upgrading to 13 are experiencing boot loops when they either sideload the OTA or use the automatic install.

TBH I've found it much more time consuming to apply the OTA update, because the system has to parse, extract, and write the contents of the OTA package. On a high speed Wi-Fi connection it took about 10 minutes to download the OTA yesterday, then another 20ish to attempt to perform the update...which ended up failing anyway.

When I got home, I updated using the factory image, which took me all of 5 minutes tops.

Interesting that you were able to successfully update and root using the OTA. Others are experiencing boot loops.
Any issues with Root via the Factory Update method? This is also the method I prefer using.
 

V0latyle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Hi,

Why version 13 is dated 220624 (TP1A.220624.014, Aug 2022) ?
That's probably the build date, they just held off on releasing it until now.
So the update can be done without worry in Factory Images ?
Yes. This is how I updated my Pixel 5 without a problem.
Any issues with Root via the Factory Update method? This is also the method I prefer using.
See above.
 

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  • 3
    How is everyone's battery life on Android 13? Mine seems to be much MUCH worse.
    FYI My main phone is Pixel 6 Oriole, and I have not noticed any battery degradation with A13 but this thread is not about Pixel 6, it is about Pixel 5 and I have a Pixel 5 situation that I want to pick your brains on.

    Adventures in Pixel 5 with Android 13
    My son has a Pixel 5, and until recently he was not rooted (more on that further below), however he was at one point in the A13 Beta program (if it has any relevance), and was stuck there because opt out meant a wipe, and he didn't want that.
    With the release of A13, he had the opportunity to opt out without a wipe which he did.

    All along his updates were all OTA considering that he was not rooted.

    After opting out from Beta and being on A13 August release he wanted to root.
    Which I did for him using pf. Basically just flashed a patched boot.img.
    All went well and he was using it fine.
    As far as I know his only complaint was that reboots were now taking longer than before.

    With the September release, I did full factory update on both slots keeping root.
    The process had no error messages and everything went fine.

    However the phone started having random freezes/hangs, and random reboots, and was getting hot.
    I first tried to disable any Magisk modules he had other than SafetyNet Mod, still the same.
    Next we decided to flash back the August release (one slot only) to see if going back would fix the issue, in case this was something new with the September release.
    We got the dreaded Your device is corrupt message, with the phone rebooting to recovery.

    I sideloaded September OTA, and that got the phone running again (not rooted)
    But the freeze and reboots returned (the phone wouldn't last 5 minutes without a freeze or reboot)

    I tried many ways to go back to the August release
    (All without wipe)
    • Factory flash with or without root in pf
    • Factory flash manually
    • OTA sideload
    • Android flash tools (which failed with the following message) for both Sep and Aug releases
    1662606348979.png


    1662606363244.png
    and no matter what I did, I would get the device corrupt message, tried both slots and each slot separately as well.

    One thing I noticed is that flashing the bootloader was getting an error, even though the device was already on that bootloader (incidentally, not Aug and Sep have the same version of the bootloader: bootloader-redfin-r3-0.5-8633620.img)

    Code:
    Sending 'bootloader' (8762 KB)                     OKAY [  0.233s]Writing 'bootloader'                               FAILED (remote: 'No such file or directory')
    fastboot: error: Command failed
    Rebooting into bootloader                          OKAY [  0.002s]

    Whereas a successful flashing of bootloader would output

    Code:
    Sending 'bootloader_b' (8762 KB)                   OKAY [  0.349s]
    Writing 'bootloader_b'                             (bootloader) Flashing Pack version r3-0.5-8633620
    (bootloader) Flashing partition table for Lun = 0
    (bootloader) Flashing partition table for Lun = 1
    (bootloader) Flashing partition table for Lun = 2
    (bootloader) Flashing partition table for Lun = 4
    (bootloader) Flashing partition table for Lun = 5
    (bootloader) Flashing partition xbl_b
    (bootloader) Flashing partition xbl_config_b
    (bootloader) Flashing partition aop_b
    (bootloader) Flashing partition tz_b
    (bootloader) Flashing partition hyp_b
    (bootloader) Flashing partition abl_b
    (bootloader) Flashing partition keymaster_b
    (bootloader) Flashing partition devcfg_b
    (bootloader) Flashing partition qupfw_b
    (bootloader) Flashing partition uefisecapp_b
    (bootloader) Flashing partition featenabler_b
    (bootloader) Flashing partition logfs
    OKAY [  0.251s]
    Finished. Total time: 0.862s

    So I didn't have a choice other than flashing back the September release and trying to figure out what was causing the freezes and reboots. Yucks

    Long story short, I was able to narrow it down to a program called Greenify that he had been using, for whatever reasons that App on September release was causing the hangs and reboots.

    Now he has patched September release flashed to both slots, and I haven't seen him for a while, which should be a good sign :)

    My questions:
    Does anyone know anything about not being able to downgrade to A13 August release? what would cause that issue?

    And also why bootloader flashing was often causing that error, even though what was being flashed was already the exact same thing that was on the system.

    I know it is not the fastboot drivers, that was the first thing I checked, everything else kept on flashing just fine.

    Sorry for long winded post, I didn't want risk leaving out any detail that might be relevant.
  • 15
    If you are looking for my guide on a different Pixel, find it here:
    Update 6-20-22: Magisk 25.1 is recommended as this includes fixes for OTA updates.
    Discussion thread for migration to 24.0+.

    DO NOT use any version of Magisk lower than Canary 23016 as it does not yet incorporate the necessary fixes for Android 12 and your device.


    WARNING: YOU AND YOU ALONE ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANYTHING THAT HAPPENS TO YOUR DEVICE. THIS GUIDE IS WRITTEN WITH THE EXPRESS ASSUMPTION THAT YOU ARE FAMILIAR WITH ADB, MAGISK, ANDROID, AND ROOT. IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO ENSURE YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING.

    Prerequisites:


    Android Source - Setting up a device for development


    1. Follow these instructions to enable Developer Options and USB Debugging.
    2. Enable OEM Unlocking. If this option is grayed out, unlocking the bootloader is not possible.
    3. Connect your device to your PC, and open a command window in your Platform Tools folder.
    4. Ensure ADB sees your device:
      Code:
      adb devices
      If you don't see a device, make sure USB Debugging is enabled, reconnect the USB cable, or try a different USB cable.
      If you see "unauthorized", you need to authorize the connection on your device.
      If you see the device without "unauthorized", you're good to go.
    5. Reboot to bootloader:
      Code:
      adb reboot bootloader
    6. Unlock bootloader: THIS WILL WIPE YOUR DEVICE!
      Code:
      fastboot flashing unlock
      Select Continue on the device screen.

    1. Install Magisk on your device.
    2. Download the factory zip for your build.
    3. Inside the factory zip is the update zip: "device-image-buildnumber.zip". Open this, and extract boot.img
    4. Copy boot.img to your device.
    5. Patch boot.img with Magisk: "Install" > "Select and Patch a File"
    6. Copy the patched image back to your PC. It will be named "magisk_patched-23xxx_xxxxx.img". Rename this to "master root.img" and retain it for future updates.
    7. Reboot your device to bootloader.
    8. Flash the patched image:
      Code:
      fastboot flash boot <drag and drop master root.img here>
    9. Reboot to Android. Open Magisk to confirm root - under Magisk at the top, you should see "Installed: <Magisk build number>

    1. Before you download the OTA, open Magisk, tap Uninstall, then Restore Images. If you have any Magisk modules that modify system, uninstall them now.
    2. Take the OTA update when prompted. To check for updates manually, go to Settings > System > System Update > Check for Update
    3. Allow the update to download and install. DO NOT REBOOT WHEN PROMPTED. Open Magisk, tap Install at the top, then Install to inactive slot. Magisk will then reboot your device.
    4. You should now be updated with root.

    1. Download the OTA.
    2. Reboot to recovery and sideload the OTA:
      Code:
      adb reboot sideload
      Once in recovery:
      Code:
      adb sideload ota.zip
    3. When the OTA completes, you will be in recovery mode. Select "Reboot to system now".
    4. Allow system to boot and wait for the update to complete. You must let the system do this before proceeding.
    5. Reboot to bootloader.
    6. Boot the master root image (See note 1):
      Code:
      fastboot boot <drag and drop master root.img here>
      Note: If you prefer, you can download the factory zip and manually patch the new boot image, then flash it after the update. Do not flash an older boot image after updating.
    7. Your device should boot with root. Open Magisk, tap Install, and select Direct Install.
    8. Reboot your device. You should now be updated with root.
    Note: You can use Payload Dumper to extract the contents of the OTA if you want to manually patch the new boot image. However, I will not cover that in this guide.

    Please note that the factory update process expects an updated bootloader and radio. If these are not up to date, the update will fail.
    1. Download the factory zip and extract the contents.
    2. Reboot to bootloader.
    3. Compare bootloader versions between phone screen and bootloader.img build number
      Code:
      fastboot flash bootloader <drag and drop new bootloader.img here>
      If bootloader is updated, reboot to bootloader.
    4. Compare baseband versions between phone screen and radio.img build number
      Code:
      fastboot flash radio <drag and drop radio.img here>
      If radio is updated, reboot to bootloader.
    5. Apply update:
      Code:
      fastboot update --skip-reboot image-codename-buildnumber.zip
      When the update completes, the device will be in fastbootd. Reboot to bootloader.
    6. Boot the master root image (See note 1):
      Code:
      fastboot boot <drag and drop master root.img here>
      Note: If you prefer, you can manually patch the new boot image, then flash it after the update. Do not flash an older boot image after updating.
    7. Your device should boot with root. Open Magisk, tap Install, and select Direct Install.
    8. Reboot your device. You should now be updated with root.
    Note: If you prefer, you can update using the flash-all script included in the factory zip. You will have to copy the script, bootloader image, radio image, and update zip into the Platform Tools folder; you will then have to edit the script to remove the -w option so it doesn't wipe your device.
    The scripted commands should look like this:
    Code:
    fastboot flash bootloader <bootloader image name>
    fastboot reboot bootloader
    ping -n 5 127.0.0.1 > nul
    fastboot flash radio <radio image name>
    fastboot reboot bootloader
    ping -n 5 127.0.0.1 > nul
    fastboot update  --skip-reboot --slot=all <image-device-buildnumber.zip>
    Once this completes, you can reboot to bootloader and either boot your master patched image, or if you patched the new image, flash it at this time.

    PixelFlasher by @badabing2003 is an excellent tool that streamlines the update process - it even patches the boot image for you.
    The application essentially automates the ADB interface to make updating and rooting much easier. However, it is STRONGLY recommended that you still learn the "basics" of using ADB.

    For instructions, downloads, and support, please refer to the PixelFlasher thread.

    1. Follow the instructions on the Android Flash Tool to update your device. Make sure Lock Bootloader and Wipe Device are UNCHECKED.
    2. When the update completes, the device will be in fastbootd. Reboot to bootloader.
    3. Boot the master root image (See note 1):
      Code:
      fastboot boot <drag and drop master root.img here>
      Note: If you prefer, you can download the factory zip and manually patch the new boot image, then flash it after the update. Do not flash an older boot image after updating.
    4. Your device should boot with root. Open Magisk, tap Install, and select Direct Install.
    5. Reboot your device. You should now be updated with root.

    Please note that the SafetyNet API has been deprecated for the Play Integrity API. Because Play Integrity relies on Hardware Key Attestation for the MEETS_STRONG_INTEGRITY evaluationType, it is not possible, nor will it ever be, to pass Play Integrity on a modified system with an unlocked bootloader. More information here.

    However, @Displax has modified the original Universal SafetyNet Fix by kdrag0n; his mod forces the "old" SafetyNet attestation, as if your device were running a version of Android older than 8.0.

    Mod available here. Do not use MagiskHide Props Config with this mod.

    Please note that this is a temporary solution; any apps that remove legacy support for SafetyNet will not benefit from this; the only reason this hasn't already happened is because doing so would prevent anyone using legacy Android versions older than 8.0 from using said apps.

    This is my configuration that is passing Safety Net. I will not provide instructions on how to accomplish this. Attempt at your own risk.

    Zygisk + DenyList enabled
    All subcomponents of these apps hidden under DenyList:
    • Google Play Store
    • GPay
    • Any banking/financial apps
    • Any DRM media apps
    Modules:
    • Universal SafetyNet Fix 2.3.1 Mod - XDA post
    To check SafetyNet status:
    To check Play Integrity status:
    I do not provide support for Magisk or modules. If you need help with Magisk, here is the Magisk General Support thread. For support specifically with Magisk v24+, see this thread.

    Points of note:
    • The boot image is NOT the bootloader image. Do not confuse the two - YOU are expected to know the difference. Flashing the wrong image to bootloader could brick your device.
    • While the Magisk app is used for patching the boot image, the app and the patch are separate. This is what you should see in Magisk for functioning root:
      screenshot_20211218-194517-png.5486339
    • "Installed" shows the version of patch in the boot image. If this says N/A, you do not have root access - the boot image is not patched, or you have a problem with Magisk.
    • "App" simply shows the version of the app itself.
    • If you do not have a patched master boot image, you will need to download the factory zip if you haven't already, extract the system update inside it, then patch boot.img.
    • If you prefer updating with the factory image, you can also extract and manually patch the boot image if desired.
    • Some Magisk modules, especially those that modify read only partitions like /system, may cause a boot loop after updating. As a general rule, disable these modules before updating. You are responsible for knowing what you have installed, and what modules to disable.


    Credits:
    Thanks to @ipdev , @kdrag0n , @Didgeridoohan , and last but not least, @topjohnwu for all their hard work!
    6
    Magisk Canary was updated to 23016 last night. This includes a fix for the vbmeta header issue, meaning that disabling verity/verification should no longer be required, and we should be able to root as we did before. This needs testing, make sure you back up your data and photos before you try this!

    Q: "If verity/verification are disabled, do I need to enable them now?"
    A: No. The only thing you have to do is update to Magisk 23016.
    Q: "Will enabling verity/verification wipe my data?"
    A: No.

    I will be updating the OP to reflect this.
    4
    For those who are wondering, this is how I updated my Pixel 5 (and my wife's 5a):
    1. Download and extract the factory image
    2. Extract boot.img from the factory update image
    3. Copied boot.img to device, patched in Magisk, copied patched boot image back to update folder
    4. Reboot device to bootloader
    5. Apply update:
      Code:
      fastboot update device-image-buildnumber.zip
    6. Let device boot and finish update; reboot to bootloader
    7. Boot patched image:
      Code:
      fastboot boot magisk_patched-23016_xxxxx.img
    8. Open Magisk, tap Install, Direct Install, then reboot.
    9. Done.
    You can potentially save a couple steps by using --skip-reboot when applying the update, then simply rebooting to bootloader and flashing the patched boot image.

    Note: I manually patched the boot image because I didn't have a 23016 boot image handy.
    4
    For those who are wondering, this is how I updated my Pixel 5 (and my wife's 5a):
    1. Download and extract the factory image
    2. Extract boot.img from the factory update image
    3. Copied boot.img to device, patched in Magisk, copied patched boot image back to update folder
    4. Reboot device to bootloader
    5. Apply update:
      Code:
      fastboot update device-image-buildnumber.zip
    6. Let device boot and finish update; reboot to bootloader
    7. Boot patched image:
      Code:
      fastboot boot magisk_patched-23016_xxxxx.img
    8. Open Magisk, tap Install, Direct Install, then reboot.
    9. Done.
    You can potentially save a couple steps by using --skip-reboot when applying the update, then simply rebooting to bootloader and flashing the patched boot image.

    Note: I manually patched the boot image because I didn't have a 23016 boot image handy.
    Confirmed working

    Just applied January update like how I have always been doing on Android 11. This wouldn't be possible without Magisk version 23016
    4
    @TKruzze @V0latyle If you're using USNF it doesn't matter if you add the necessary gms components to the Deny listh. The module will always remove them since keeping them on the list will actually keep USNF from doing it's thing.

    For simple SafetyNet pass Universal SafetyNet Fix is all you need (and possibly MagiskHide Props Config if you need to spoof a device fingerprint).