How To Guide [GUIDE] Pixel 5a "barbet": Unlock Bootloader, Update, Root, Pass SafetyNet

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cr1_1

Member
Dec 6, 2012
6
0
Hi,
Please reconsider the "deprecated" instructions about vbmeta :

fastboot flash vbmeta --disable-verity --disable-verification vbmeta.img

The above command SAVED me.

I was stuck in a slow motion bootloop (Pixel 5A and 4A both had this behavior) when upgrading from Android 11 to Android 12 on rooted phones with Magisk (both stable and canary versions). Even clean installs with factory reset did not stop this bootloop.

What finally did was doing a factory wipe, clean install using full factory images then rebooting into recovery (before booting into system) and selecting restart bootloader. From the bootloader (and from a PC) I used

fastboot flash vbmeta --disable-verity --disable-verification vbmeta.img

then rebooted into system. Rock solid stable.

So Magisk canary evidently doesn't do anything to the vbmeta flags. I still needed to explicitly disable the verfication settings.

Then I happily installed Magisk canary, configured the Zygist/Denylist, systemless hosts, and safety-net-fix 2.2.1.
All good, all stable.
 

cr1_1

Member
Dec 6, 2012
6
0
Hi,
Please reconsider the "deprecated" instructions about vbmeta :

fastboot flash vbmeta --disable-verity --disable-verification vbmeta.img

The above command SAVED me.

I was stuck in a slow motion bootloop (Pixel 5A and 4A both had this behavior) when upgrading from Android 11 to Android 12 on rooted phones with Magisk (both stable and canary versions). Even clean installs with factory reset did not stop this bootloop.

What finally did was doing a factory wipe, clean install using full factory images then rebooting into recovery (before booting into system) and selecting restart bootloader. From the bootloader (and from a PC) I used

fastboot flash vbmeta --disable-verity --disable-verification vbmeta.img

then rebooted into system. Rock solid stable.

So Magisk canary evidently doesn't do anything to the vbmeta flags. I still needed to explicitly disable the verfication settings.

Then I happily installed Magisk canary, configured the Zygist/Denylist, systemless hosts, and safety-net-fix 2.2.1.
All good, all stable.
Nuts. after about 2 hours, the bootloop is back, after I rebooted manually. Does vbmeta get reset on reboot?
 

V0latyle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Nuts. after about 2 hours, the bootloop is back, after I rebooted manually. Does vbmeta get reset on reboot?
No, and you shouldn't have needed to disable verity or verification. Magisk does not change these flags; what WAS fixed was the way Magisk handles the boot image header, so it preserves the vbmeta flags within the boot image so that disabling verity/verification are not necessary. This was implemented in Canary 23016, which at the time I write this is still the current canary.

What version of Magisk are you using?
 

cr1_1

Member
Dec 6, 2012
6
0
No, and you shouldn't have needed to disable verity or verification. Magisk does not change these flags; what WAS fixed was the way Magisk handles the boot image header, so it preserves the vbmeta flags within the boot image so that disabling verity/verification are not necessary. This was implemented in Canary 23016, which at the time I write this is still the current canary.

What version of Magisk are you using?
Hi, thank you for responding. I am using Canary 23016. Enabled Zygist, configure the Denylist to hide Google Play services, Google Play store, my banking app and GPay. Also installed safety-net-fix 2.2.0 and systemless hosts.

The looping began after flashing the magisk-patched boot image (taken from the Dec 5, 2021 barbet full factory boot.img. Upon rebooting into system, the looping began.

I also did a factory reset, without restoring any of my apps, just as when the Pixel5a came out of the box. When I installed Canary 23016 and then flashed the magisk-patched boot img, the same bootloop behavior appeared.

Since then I did a complete factory reset, restored my apps, etc. But did not install anything Magisk and obiously no root. The phone is now stable. no bootloop.

By the way, what I am calling a bootloop means booting up into the system, logging in, and waiting between 10 and 60 secs. the phone then freezes, becoming unresponsive to any touch, and the clock time freezes. Within another 30 secs after this freeze, the phone will reboot itself without my doing anything. Even if I then do not login but just leave the phone at the login screen, the freezing and eventual rebooting will continue.

Also, this rebooting is strange in that the unlocked bootloader warning screen does not appear so maybe it's some kind of partial reboot?

Anyway, much thanks for any suggestions you might have.

p.s. I can flash the Pixel5a with Android 11 os from Oct 2021, and root with Magisk stable, Riru, etc and the phone is rock solid. Also, this behavior is identical to a Pixel 4a I have when I tried upgrading to Android 12 on that phone.
Something in the magisk-patched boot.img is making both phones unstable. or maybe flashing any boot.img patched or not causes the instability?
 
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V0latyle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Hi, thank you for responding. I am using Canary 23016. Enabled Zygist, configure the Denylist to hide Google Play services, Google Play store, my banking app and GPay. Also installed safety-net-fix 2.2.0 and systemless hosts.

The looping began after flashing the magisk-patched boot image (taken from the Dec 5, 2021 barbet full factory boot.img. Upon rebooting into system, the looping began.

I also did a factory reset, without restoring any of my apps, just as when the Pixel5a came out of the box. When I installed Canary 23016 and then flashed the magisk-patched boot img, the same bootloop behavior appeared.

Since then I did a complete factory reset, restored my apps, etc. But did not install anything Magisk and obiously no root. The phone is now stable. no bootloop.

By the way, what I am calling a bootloop means booting up into the system, logging in, and waiting between 10 and 60 secs. the phone then freezes, becoming unresponsive to any touch, and the clock time freezes. Within another 30 secs after this freeze, the phone will reboot itself without my doing anything. Even if I then do not login but just leave the phone at the login screen, the freezing and eventual rebooting will continue.

Also, this rebooting is strange in that the unlocked bootloader warning screen does not appear so maybe it's some kind of partial reboot?

Anyway, much thanks for any suggestions you might have.

p.s. I can flash the Pixel5a with Android 11 os from Oct 2021, and root with Magisk stable, Riru, etc and the phone is rock solid. Also, this behavior is identical to a Pixel 4a I have when I tried upgrading to Android 12 on that phone.
Something in the magisk-patched boot.img is making both phones unstable. or maybe flashing any boot.img patched or not causes the instability?
A properly patched boot image won't cause instability. You're having a unique issue.

Are you using the latest platform tools? Current version is 31.0.3

Can you try using another cable or PC?

Where did you download Magisk from?
 

cr1_1

Member
Dec 6, 2012
6
0
A properly patched boot image won't cause instability. You're having a unique issue.

Are you using the latest platform tools? Current version is 31.0.3

Can you try using another cable or PC?

Where did you download Magisk from?
hi,
I checked and made sure I am using platform-tools_r31.0.3-windows as linked from Google's latest factory image page. I downloaded Canary from TopJohnWu's GitHub page. Also tried several new USB cables.

I tried doing yet another factory reset, and clean install using flash-all.bat with wipe. I set up the phone without restoring any of my apps, just the few default included Google apps. Downloaded Canary again.

Just for grins, I extracted boot.img from the Android 12 OS Dec 5, 2021 release, which is the factory image I have been using, rebooted into the bootloader and fastboot flash boot boot.img to see if flashing was somehow corrupting the boot.img. Rebooted into system and it is rock solid.
The same problem of bootlooping after flashing magisk-patched image occurred with the Nov 2021 Android 12 factory image.

Then I flashed the magisk-patched boot image. Rebooted into system. The phone was stable for several minutes.
I then rebooted the phone. And the bootlooping started up again. Why does rebooting triggered the bootloop instability?

I downloaded and partially installed Canary 23016 (didn't flash the boot image, just installed app-debug.apk.) And no problems . It is the flashing of the patched boot image which somehow causes the bootlooping

Nothing like this happened with Magisk and Android 11. rock solid. Sigh.

Thank you for your suggestions. Hopefully this can be solved. And the problem appears on Pixel4A and Pixel 5A.
 
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iamnitsuji

Member
Jul 19, 2017
7
3
OnePlus 5
Google Pixel 5a
Give V0latyle a standing ovation! These are the clearest root instructions I've ever followed. My last, older phone was fine with stable Magisk and no modules for passing SafetyNet. I am so glad I didn't try stable Magisk. I had no idea about Canary, Zygisk, and these modules. This was a piece of cake. Every app that cares, doesn't see that I'm rooted. Woo hoo! Thanks, man!
 
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V0latyle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Just for grins, I extracted boot.img from the Android 12 OS Dec 5, 2021 release, which is the factory image I have been using, rebooted into the bootloader and fastboot flash boot boot.img to see if flashing was somehow corrupting the boot.img. Rebooted into system and it is rock solid.
So patching the December update with Magisk was stable? I'm not sure I see the problem. If you're able to root on the latest update and are stable, why would you want anything else?
The same problem of bootlooping after flashing magisk-patched image occurred with the Nov 2021 Android 12 factory image.
Again, why would you want to go back to November? Just use the latest release.
Then I flashed the magisk-patched boot image. Rebooted into system. The phone was stable for several minutes.
I then rebooted the phone. And the bootlooping started up again. Why does rebooting triggered the bootloop instability?
It shouldn't. As I mentioned previously, you seem to be having a unique issue. Since you mention this problem happening on two devices, you need to make sure you aren't confusing the software between the two of them. The 5a boot image won't work on the 4a and vice versa.

This is what I would do in your shoes:
  1. Download the December factory image. Rename it so that you know what device it is for - i.e., "Pixel 5A Dec 2021.zip"
  2. Reboot to bootloader, connect your phone via USB, and go to Android Flash Tool
  3. Install the same factory update you downloaded. Make sure the build number matches. Check the "Wipe Data" and "Force Flash All Partitions" boxes.
  4. When flashing is complete, set up your phone, and install Magisk 23016
  5. Unzip the December factory image, then unzip the "image-device-buildnumber.zip" inside it. Copy boot.img from this zip to your device.
  6. Patch boot.img in Magisk. Before you copy it back to your computer, delete ALL previously patched boot images. Make sure you rename the patched boot images so you know what device they are for, i.e., "Magisk 23016 5a.img"
  7. Reboot your device to bootloader, and flash the patched boot image. MAKE SURE you are using the boot image for that specific device.
Again, I can't stress it enough - if you're doing this on more than one device, make sure you are segregating the files and folders so you don't accidentally flash the 5a firmware or boot image on the 4a and vice versa.

Also, make sure you are using Command Prompt, not PowerShell.
 
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CarinaPDX

Senior Member
Jun 30, 2013
278
92
Google Pixel 5a
Thanks for your work. I had issues of undetermined origin with 11, and had been delaying upgrading to 12, so as a result of the problems I wiped the 5a and did a Flash Tool install of the December factory image and then rooted with Magisk Canary; it worked well.

Today I tried 4 times to download and install the January OTA Security release, and each time it fails to finish the install after downloading. The instructions in post #1 say to take the OTA but don't mention any required prior steps. Could it be that I have to uninstall Magisk first? Or something else? Thanks for any help.
 

V0latyle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
A stupid question - No need to unlock bootloader before rooting using this method?
Did you read the OP? Rooting is not possible without an unlocked bootloader.
Thanks for your work. I had issues of undetermined origin with 11, and had been delaying upgrading to 12, so as a result of the problems I wiped the 5a and did a Flash Tool install of the December factory image and then rooted with Magisk Canary; it worked well.

Today I tried 4 times to download and install the January OTA Security release, and each time it fails to finish the install after downloading. The instructions in post #1 say to take the OTA but don't mention any required prior steps. Could it be that I have to uninstall Magisk first? Or something else? Thanks for any help.
Nothing else should be required. I personally don't update via OTA; I use the factory image. It's normal for the OTA to fail on a rooted device, although sometimes retrying it will succeed.

Uninstalling Magisk should not be necessary. I just updated my 5 and wife's 5a without changing anything - just updated using factory image, flashed patched boot image, and done.

For those who are wondering, this is how I updated my wife's 5a (and my Pixel 5):
  1. Download and extract the factory image
  2. Extract boot.img from the factory update image
  3. Copied boot.img to device, patched in Magisk, copied patched boot image back to update folder
  4. Reboot device to bootloader
  5. Apply update:
    Code:
    fastboot update device-image-buildnumber.zip
  6. Let device boot and finish update; reboot to bootloader
  7. Boot patched image:
    Code:
    fastboot boot magisk_patched-23016_xxxxx.img
  8. Open Magisk, tap Install, Direct Install, then reboot.
  9. Done.
You can potentially save a couple steps by using --skip-reboot when applying the update, then simply rebooting to bootloader and flashing the patched boot image.
 
Last edited:

peikojose

Senior Member
May 13, 2012
1,048
179
Did you read the OP? Rooting is not possible without an unlocked bootloader. Nothing else should be required. I personally don't update via OTA; I use the factory image. It's normal for the OTA to fail on a rooted device, although sometimes retrying it will succeed. Uninstalling Magisk should not be necessary. I just updated my 5 and wife's 5a without changing anything - just updated using factory image, flashed patched boot image, and done. For those who are wondering, this is how I updated my wife's 5a (and my Pixel 5):
  1. Download and extract the factory image
  2. Extract boot.img from the factory update image
  3. Copied boot.img to device, patched in Magisk, copied patched boot image back to update folder
  4. Reboot device to bootloader
  5. Apply update:
    Code:
    fastboot update device-image-buildnumber.zip
  6. Let device boot and finish update; reboot to bootloader
  7. Boot patched image:
    Code:
    fastboot boot magisk_patched-23016_xxxxx.img
  8. Open Magisk, tap Install, Direct Install, then reboot.
  9. Done.
You can potentially save a couple steps by using --skip-reboot when applying the update, then simply rebooting to bootloader and flashing the patched boot image.

Doing that you need to flash the new bootloader and radio, right? I don't see you did that.
 

CarinaPDX

Senior Member
Jun 30, 2013
278
92
Google Pixel 5a
OK, thanks for that. I would rather get the OTA working as that is a lot smaller than the 2GB+ factory image to download. If I select Uninstall in Magisk and then restore images would that end up wiping or encrypting my data?
 

CarinaPDX

Senior Member
Jun 30, 2013
278
92
Google Pixel 5a
Doing that you need to flash the new bootloader and radio, right? I don't see you did that.
A full factory image has all images included. It is optional to install all partitions or just those that need updating. The whole point is that you end up with a complete OEM firmware with all partitions at a known good release. In the past, and possibly in the future, OTAs (i.e. partial updates) have on occasion not resulted in everything working right - requiring a factory image to fix. The advantage of OTAs is that they try to migrate data if there is a change of format for certain config files (especially between full releases such as 11 to 12), but this is also a potential failure point.
 

peikojose

Senior Member
May 13, 2012
1,048
179
A full factory image has all images included. It is optional to install all partitions or just those that need updating. The whole point is that you end up with a complete OEM firmware with all partitions at a known good release. In the past, and possibly in the future, OTAs (i.e. partial updates) have on occasion not resulted in everything working right - requiring a factory image to fix. The advantage of OTAs is that they try to migrate data if there is a change of format for certain config files (especially between full releases such as 11 to 12), but this is also a potential failure point.
I mean using this fastboot update device-image-buildnumber.zip

I don't think that will update radio and bootloader
 

CarinaPDX

Senior Member
Jun 30, 2013
278
92
Google Pixel 5a
I mean using this fastboot update device-image-buildnumber.zip

I don't think that will update radio and bootloader
If you flash the factory image it's shell script will work properly. An update command may not get you where you want to go. I have always used the command line tools but the install of 12 I did with the Android Flash Tool web app and it was very easy and clear. You should back up (sync) everything before proceeding of course.
 

V0latyle

Forum Moderator
Staff member
Doing that you need to flash the new bootloader and radio, right? I don't see you did that.
The bootloader and baseband version in the January update are the same as December. Updating them is only necessary if the versions are different; the system update will fail if the bootloader and baseband versions don't match expected.
OK, thanks for that. I would rather get the OTA working as that is a lot smaller than the 2GB+ factory image to download. If I select Uninstall in Magisk and then restore images would that end up wiping or encrypting my data?
No. But, if you do not already have a Magisk 23016 patched boot image handy, you're still going to need that.

Uninstalling Magisk is not necessary to update.
I mean using this fastboot update device-image-buildnumber.zip

I don't think that will update radio and bootloader
If you flash the factory image it's shell script will work properly. An update command may not get you where you want to go. I have always used the command line tools but the install of 12 I did with the Android Flash Tool web app and it was very easy and clear. You should back up (sync) everything before proceeding of course.
I don't use the shell script - I manually compared the bootloader and baseband versions, and simply applied the system update. There is no need to reflash bootloader and baseband if they haven't been updated.
 

nijel8

Senior Member
Dec 24, 2011
2,423
5,646
All over US
Google Pixel 5a
Just in case sharing a tip for a situation I have encountered multiple times while building and testing TWRP boot.img,
This will happen if you try to boot any broken(corrupted) unbootable boot.img.
Fastboot sends the image to device and bootloader reports with unsupported. You reboot and phone goes straight to recovery with 2 options - try again or wipe data. You can't boot to Android keeping data any more despite the fact that you didn't flash anything and boot_a/b partitions are still good. In that case the only way out is to do "fastboot boot <known good boot.img>" and then do normal reboot with no lost of data.
Hope this never happens, but now you know if it does...
 
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  • 1
    So I tried the OTA for the June Update and it worked. Somehow I still ended up missing a step somewhere because even though I had updated to the latest Canary (25001) I was unable to see the option to install to the inactive slot. So I just an already patched kernel to boot and then ran Magisk install. And was up and running again.
    1
    So I went back and figured out the problem. I rebooted after restoring image and before taking the OTA, which explains why I didn't have the option to install in the inactive slot.
  • 20
    If you are looking for my guide on a different Pixel, find it here:
    Update 6-20-22: Magisk 25.1 is recommended as this includes fixes for OTA updates.
    Discussion thread for migration to 24.0+.

    DO NOT use any version of Magisk lower than Canary 23016 as it does not yet incorporate the necessary fixes for Android 12 and your device.


    WARNING: YOU AND YOU ALONE ARE RESPONSIBLE FOR ANYTHING THAT HAPPENS TO YOUR DEVICE. THIS GUIDE IS WRITTEN WITH THE EXPRESS ASSUMPTION THAT YOU ARE FAMILIAR WITH ADB, MAGISK, ANDROID, AND ROOT. IT IS YOUR RESPONSIBILITY TO ENSURE YOU KNOW WHAT YOU ARE DOING.

    Prerequisites:


    Android Source - Setting up a device for development


    1. Follow these instructions to enable Developer Options and USB Debugging.
    2. Enable OEM Unlocking. If this option is grayed out, unlocking the bootloader is not possible.
    3. Connect your device to your PC, and open a command window in your Platform Tools folder.
    4. Ensure ADB sees your device:
      Code:
      adb devices
      If you don't see a device, make sure USB Debugging is enabled, reconnect the USB cable, or try a different USB cable.
      If you see "unauthorized", you need to authorize the connection on your device.
      If you see the device without "unauthorized", you're good to go.
    5. Reboot to bootloader:
      Code:
      adb reboot bootloader
    6. Unlock bootloader: THIS WILL WIPE YOUR DEVICE!
      Code:
      fastboot flashing unlock
      Select Continue on the device screen.

    1. Install Magisk on your device.
    2. Download the factory zip for your build.
    3. Inside the factory zip is the update zip: "device-image-buildnumber.zip". Open this, and extract boot.img
    4. Copy boot.img to your device.
    5. Patch boot.img with Magisk: "Install" > "Select and Patch a File"
    6. Copy the patched image back to your PC. It will be named "magisk_patched-23xxx_xxxxx.img". Rename this to "master root.img" and retain it for future updates.
    7. Reboot your device to bootloader.
    8. Flash the patched image:
      Code:
      fastboot flash boot <drag and drop master root.img here>
    9. Reboot to Android. Open Magisk to confirm root - under Magisk at the top, you should see "Installed: <Magisk build number>

    1. Before you download the OTA, open Magisk, tap Uninstall, then Restore Images. If you have any Magisk modules that modify system, uninstall them now.
    2. Take the OTA update when prompted. To check for updates manually, go to Settings > System > System Update > Check for Update
    3. Allow the update to download and install. DO NOT REBOOT WHEN PROMPTED. Open Magisk, tap Install at the top, then Install to inactive slot. Magisk will then reboot your device.
    4. You should now be updated with root.

    1. Download the OTA.
    2. Reboot to recovery and sideload the OTA:
      Code:
      adb reboot sideload
      Once in recovery:
      Code:
      adb sideload ota.zip
    3. When the OTA completes, you will be in recovery mode. Select "Reboot to system now".
    4. Allow system to boot and wait for the update to complete. You must let the system do this before proceeding.
    5. Reboot to bootloader.
    6. Boot the master root image (See note 1):
      Code:
      fastboot boot <drag and drop master root.img here>
      Note: If you prefer, you can download the factory zip and manually patch the new boot image, then flash it after the update. Do not flash an older boot image after updating.
    7. Your device should boot with root. Open Magisk, tap Install, and select Direct Install.
    8. Reboot your device. You should now be updated with root.
    Note: You can use Payload Dumper to extract the contents of the OTA if you want to manually patch the new boot image. However, I will not cover that in this guide.

    Please note that the factory update process expects an updated bootloader and radio. If these are not up to date, the update will fail.
    1. Download the factory zip and extract the contents.
    2. Reboot to bootloader.
    3. Compare bootloader versions between phone screen and bootloader.img build number
      Code:
      fastboot flash bootloader <drag and drop new bootloader.img here>
      If bootloader is updated, reboot to bootloader.
    4. Compare baseband versions between phone screen and radio.img build number
      Code:
      fastboot flash radio <drag and drop radio.img here>
      If radio is updated, reboot to bootloader.
    5. Apply update:
      Code:
      fastboot update --skip-reboot image-codename-buildnumber.zip
      When the update completes, the device will be in fastbootd. Reboot to bootloader.
    6. Boot the master root image (See note 1):
      Code:
      fastboot boot <drag and drop master root.img here>
      Note: If you prefer, you can manually patch the new boot image, then flash it after the update. Do not flash an older boot image after updating.
    7. Your device should boot with root. Open Magisk, tap Install, and select Direct Install.
    8. Reboot your device. You should now be updated with root.
    Note: If you prefer, you can update using the flash-all script included in the factory zip. You will have to copy the script, bootloader image, radio image, and update zip into the Platform Tools folder; you will then have to edit the script to remove the -w option so it doesn't wipe your device.
    The scripted commands should look like this:
    Code:
    fastboot flash bootloader <bootloader image name>
    fastboot reboot bootloader
    ping -n 5 127.0.0.1 > nul
    fastboot flash radio <radio image name>
    fastboot reboot bootloader
    ping -n 5 127.0.0.1 > nul
    fastboot update  --skip-reboot --slot=all <image-device-buildnumber.zip>
    Once this completes, you can reboot to bootloader and either boot your master patched image, or if you patched the new image, flash it at this time.

    1. Follow the instructions on the Android Flash Tool to update your device. Make sure Lock Bootloader and Wipe Device are UNCHECKED.
    2. When the update completes, the device will be in fastbootd. Reboot to bootloader.
    3. Boot the master root image (See note 1):
      Code:
      fastboot boot <drag and drop master root.img here>
      Note: If you prefer, you can download the factory zip and manually patch the new boot image, then flash it after the update. Do not flash an older boot image after updating.
    4. Your device should boot with root. Open Magisk, tap Install, and select Direct Install.
    5. Reboot your device. You should now be updated with root.

    This is my configuration that is passing Safety Net. I will not provide instructions on how to accomplish this. Attempt at your own risk.

    Zygisk + DenyList enabled
    All subcomponents of these apps hidden under DenyList:
    • Google Play Store
    • GPay
    • Any banking/financial apps
    • Any DRM media apps
    Modules:
    To check SafetyNet status:
    I do not provide support for Magisk or modules. If you need help with Magisk, here is the Magisk General Support thread. For support specifically with Magisk v24+, see this thread.

    Points of note:
    • The boot image is NOT the bootloader image. Do not confuse the two - YOU are expected to know the difference. Flashing the wrong image to bootloader could brick your device.
    • While the Magisk app is used for patching the boot image, the app and the patch are separate. This is what you should see in Magisk for functioning root:
      screenshot_20211218-194517-png.5486339
    • "Installed" shows the version of patch in the boot image. If this says N/A, you do not have root access - the boot image is not patched, or you have a problem with Magisk.
    • "App" simply shows the version of the app itself.
    • If you do not have a patched master boot image, you will need to download the factory zip if you haven't already, extract the system update inside it, then patch boot.img.
    • If you prefer updating with the factory image, you can also extract and manually patch the boot image if desired.
    • Some Magisk modules, especially those that modify read only partitions like /system, may cause a boot loop after updating. As a general rule, disable these modules before updating. You are responsible for knowing what you have installed, and what modules to disable.


    Credits:
    Thanks to @ipdev , @kdrag0n , @Didgeridoohan , and last but not least, @topjohnwu for all their hard work!
    3
    Absolutely fantastic! Thanks for this thread and guide!

    As an aside, how is it I didn't know you can drag and drop to the command window? (This tip gets the hero of the day award in my book!)
    Makes things a whole lot easier, don't it?

    I try to stick with the KISS method. Keep It Simple, Stupid!

    Or...Keep it stupidly simple, whatever. :D
    2
    "Install to inactive slot" is no longer supported in Magisk.

    This is extremely old information from September 2020. Install to inactive slot has been re-implemented as of Magisk Canary 23017 {January 20, 2022).

    Please, check your information to ensure it's up to date before you post.
    2
    I'm currently using Magisk Canary build?
    May I Install Magisk Beta and also Magisk Stable build to the latest November 2021 build?
    I honestly don't know. I've used Magisk 22.1, 23.0, Canary 23001 through 23011, all have worked for me.

    The caveat is that Magisk 23010+ is Zygisk, which means that some legacy modules won't work anymore until they're updated - Universal SafetyNet Fix for example.
    Coming from the Pixel 3XL, which bricked out of the blue. I did every update on that phone, but never got to do 12 before the magical brick. I want to update this phone (5a, which I just realized is different than the 5?), but this seems to be missing quite a few steps. Shouldn't there be 4 different files added to your SDK folder and flashed, or has it completely changed, and I need to do more digging? Thanks.
    You don't have to add any files to your SDK folder, you can always drag and drop them into the command line window. We are only working with two files here: vbmeta.img and boot.img.
    Is there any way to do this after already updating? Or do I have to wait for the next update (I prefer flashing factory images).
    You can do this as many times as you want. The critical point to remember is that if you allow Android to boot after not disabling verity/verification, you will have to wipe the next time you disable it.
    I flashed the Nov factory image but forgot to disable the verified boot. Is there any way I can disable it so i can flash the magisk patched boot?
    Yes...but you're going to have to wipe data. Extract vbmeta.img, and reflash it:
    Code:
    fastboot flash vbmeta --disable-verity --disable-verification <drag and drop vbmeta.img here>
    Then, reboot your device. You will end up in Rescue Party, with the option to "Try again" or "Factory data reset". Choose the factory reset.

    The best way to make sure you don't have to wipe your data is to always use --disable-verity --disable-verification when updating via the factory image.
    2
    Followed directions for recommended Android Flash Tool and everything worked flawlessly. If you've already rooted your phone once then you have somewhat of an idea of what you're doing. Just read everything twice and follow the directions. Thank you OP for such a clear path to update and root!