[Guide] Setting Up and Dual-Booting a Linux-based Distro alongside Windows

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RohinZaraki

Senior Member
Sep 8, 2011
7,410
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Hey guys :) I'm sure many of you have seen and at least attempted eagleeyetom's thread on building a ROM. In the 2nd post, B.Jay helped explain how to set up a VM (Virtual Machine). Now I'm here to explain how to set up a distro and be able to dual-boot into Ubuntu/Linux Mint or Windows.

Why would you want to do so ? Linux is more "Android friendly", compared to Windows especially if you want to compile your own ROMS from source :). Plus, wouldn't you want to try something besides Windows for a change :D ?

Notes : I have tried only Ubuntu 12.04 and Linux Mint 13. From my experiance, it's easier to set up Ubuntu but unless your PC has some serious specs, it won't be a pleasant OS to use ;) I urge many to use Linux Mint over Ubuntu, since it's more forgiving on simple spec PC's.

Requirements

-3. Brain
-2. Presence of mind - to think
-1. Fingers
0. Ability to consider Google as your friend who actualy studies and has vast knowledge
1. A PC :rolleyes:
2. At least a 2GHZ, dual core CPU.
3. At least 2GB's of RAM
4. 80GB of HD space (if you're thinking of getting into serious developing)

As you can see, I'm basing these on my own PC's specs which I find can (barely) cope with dual-booting 2 OS'es (Ubuntu). Remember, these are considered bare minimum, especially when it comes to RAM. If you can, make sure you PC has these or better specs.

Dictionary

Before I begin, I'm gonna make a short dictionary on the simplified terms I'll be using

1. OS = Operating System
2. LMX = Linux Mint
3. UBT = Ubuntu
4. IMG = Image (.iso format)
5. DB = Dual Boot

Ubuntu

This is probably the easiest OS to make DB-able. However, I do not recommend using Ubuntu if you're thinking of serious developing. Use this more like a stepping stone or a test drive in Linux OS'es

1. Download WUBI (Windows Ubuntu Installer) from here.

2. Run the .exe.

3. You should end up with a window or GUI like this

300px-Ubuntu_Wubi_11.10.PNG


4. If you know what you're doing, you can configure the settings as you please. If not, just leave them as they are and just fill in your desired username and password.

5. Hit next and leave it to download + install

wubi_installing.png


6. Finally, you'll end up with a finalization menu like this.

Wubi


7. Reboot.

8 You should end up with a menu like this every time you boot your PC.

WubiGuide


9. And you're finished. :) enjoy.

If that was confusing for you, here's a Youtube vid showing how to do it in real time. Thanks, whoever you are in the vid :)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SvOFUoFk_1U

Linux Mint

Now, this one is a bit tricky but you will not regret it :).

1. Pick the flavour of your poison from here . I recommend Cinammon 64-bit version.

2. Download it. Note : It's roughly 890+MB's, so prepare to wait a while :). Note : Make sure you check the iso after it has been downloaded to see if it's exactly the same size as it's written in the website. Sometimes, downloads get interrupted for various reasons and if you're even 1MB short of the actual size, it all fails from this point on.

3. Download IMG Burner (here). It's like a Nero Burner for IMG's.

4. Now, run the IMG Burner and make sure you have an empty DVD to burn the .iso into. Make sure it has enough space to fit the 890+MB .iso. Place the DVD into your tray, run the programme, select the .iso you wish to burn and start burning.

5. After you're done, leave the DVD in the tray and reboot your PC.

6. Now enter BIOS boot mode (press F12 when your PC's brand appears on the screen after rebooting) and select boot from CD/DVD.

7. Let LMX finish installing in your PC and you will soon arrive at your Desktop. On your desktop, you will see three things ; Compter, Home and Installation CD (CD Icon).

8. Click on the Icon and continue your installation.

9. It will soon finish up and then you can enjoy your new OS :)

10. See this video for more detailed info.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPUX-0j5WCo

Please See

1. When I have time, I will tidy up and improve the instructions, especially the LMX section.
2. Next few posts will explain how to get UBT or LMX more X8 friendly :) (getting flashtool to work on it, etc)
3. Try all of this at you own risk. I won't be held responsible for any damages that occur.
4. This guide is meant to be used with eagleeyetom's Building CM7 guide as well as building from MiniCM sources :)
5. If you have any questions, IMMEDIATELY post it here before proceeding with your problem. Don't post any damages or side effects AFTER you do something w/o asking it here.

Hope this helps someone out there explore the world of Linux :) or to take a break from Windows. Please share if it works for you :D
 
Last edited:

RohinZaraki

Senior Member
Sep 8, 2011
7,410
3,741
Getting Flashtool To Work On UBT/LMX

This took some time but I managed to get Flashtool to work with our X8's/W8's in Linux. Remember, in Linux, TERMINAL is your new best friend ;) and lucky you, you'll need to use it quite a bit for this.

1. Download Flashtool from here (Linux Edition)

2. Extract the flashtool-0.x.x.x-linux.tar.7z. You'll be left with FlashTool.tar

3. Extract the .tar.

4. You'll be left with a folder called Flashtool.

Hold your horses. You can use it now but try as you may, your X8/W8 will never connect to the PC. That's why we need to configure the system to be able to read it ;)

1. Open terminal.

2. Copy this into terminal :

Code:
$ gksudo gedit /etc/udev/rules.d/51-android.rules

3. A text editor will appear. It will be blank. Not for long. Copy and paste ALL of these into that empty canvas.

Code:
#Acer
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0502", MODE="0666"

#ASUS
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0b05", MODE="0666"

#Dell
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="413c", MODE="0666"

#Foxconn
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0489", MODE="0666"

#Garmin-Asus
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="091E", MODE="0666"

#Google
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="18d1", MODE="0666"

#HTC
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0bb4", MODE="0666"

#Huawei
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="12d1", MODE="0666"

#K-Touch
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="24e3", MODE="0666"

#KT Tech
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="2116", MODE="0666"

#Kyocera
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0482", MODE="0666"

#Lenevo
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="17EF", MODE="0666"

#LG
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="1004", MODE="0666"

#Motorola
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="22b8", MODE="0666"

#NEC
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0409", MODE="0666"

#Nook
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="2080", MODE="0666"

#Nvidia
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0955", MODE="0666"

#OTGV
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="2257", MODE="0666"

#Pantech
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="10A9", MODE="0666"

#Philips
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0471", MODE="0666"

#PMC-Sierra
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="04da", MODE="0666"

#Qualcomm
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="05c6", MODE="0666"

#SK Telesys
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="1f53", MODE="0666"

#Samsung
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="04e8", MODE="0666"

#Sharp
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="04dd", MODE="0666"

#Sony Ericsson
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0fce", MODE="0666"

#Toshiba
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0930", MODE="0666"

#ZTE
SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="19D2", MODE="0666"

6. Close and save all changes.

7. Then, copy this into terminal :

Code:
$ sudo chmod a+r /etc/udev/rules.d/51-android.rules

8. Done :) enjoy the ease of not having to switch back and forth between Windows and Linux just to compile and flash kernels.

Overview

What did you do ?

You downloaded and extracted Flashtool. However, without the USB configured, it wouldn't connect with our phones. Plus, I'm sure you noticed there were other brands listed as well (#ACER, #HTC, etc.). This is used for compiling ROMs for other devices :) congrats. Have fun !
 
Last edited:

sgt. meow

Senior Member
Dec 21, 2011
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great guide rohin. you should also say that if anyone installs Ubuntu through wubi but needs more space in Ubuntu they can do so by using this.
just realized you can now apply for RC. good luck
 
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RohinZaraki

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Sep 8, 2011
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great guide rohin. you should also say that if anyone installs Ubuntu through wubi but needs more space in Ubuntu they can do so by using this.
just realized you can now apply for RC. good luck

I guess I know what thee 3rd post has potential for :) "Tips & Tricks to make Linux Dual-Booting a Smooth Journey"
 

CtrlAltDelIrl

Senior Member
Mar 7, 2012
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Your method of installing Ubuntu is as a file on the windows partition which is extremely slow..

Best not to use WUBI installer in Ubuntu and to burn the ISO like you did for Linux Mint and boot from it..

Always best to install Linux to it's own partition..

Love the guide though, hope it gets some XDA members trying Linux.. It's much easier to use than windows.
 

sgt. meow

Senior Member
Dec 21, 2011
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Actually my Ubuntu installation (through wubi; resized root disk afterwards using a tool) is pretty fast. Way faster than VBox, like 1MILx faster. It does what it's told in the amount of time it should take. So I'm happy with it. BUT...there's always a big, fat, ugly but....but it may not be the same for other users. In that case they should install Ubuntu on a partition either from a bootable CD/DVD or a LiveUSB (preferred) as has been covered in the guide.
 
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RohinZaraki

Senior Member
Sep 8, 2011
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Your method of installing Ubuntu is as a file on the windows partition which is extremely slow..

Best not to use WUBI installer in Ubuntu and to burn the ISO like you did for Linux Mint and boot from it..

Always best to install Linux to it's own partition..

Love the guide though, hope it gets some XDA members trying Linux.. It's much easier to use than windows.

The boot-from-linux method will partition itself into your HD. The wubi method was for beginners.
 

stamatis

Retired Forum Moderator
Feb 5, 2012
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stamatis∈A, A=∅
ok good and simple guide :)
i just wanna ask one thing if anyone knows...
firstly im a total noob of linux and ubuntu as my pc is from 2005,so it doesnt meet the requirements(i know there are some linux versions that are for low pcs but i dont see the reason,im ok with the windows xp :p lol)
how can you repair your pc if something goes wrong,i dont see how you can damage it if you try to dual boot,but if you try to replace windows?
is the bios ok so you fix it by there?
i dont know if this happening but are you messing with the bios in any way,so it wont be fixable?
 

fotak-x

Senior Member
May 17, 2012
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Varaždin /dev/null
ok good and simple guide :)
i just wanna ask one thing if anyone knows...
firstly im a total noob of linux and ubuntu as my pc is from 2005,so it doesnt meet the requirements(i know there are some linux versions that are for low pcs but i dont see the reason,im ok with the windows xp :p lol)
how can you repair your pc if something goes wrong,i dont see how you can damage it if you try to dual boot,but if you try to replace windows?
is the bios ok so you fix it by there?
i dont know if this happening but are you messing with the bios in any way,so it wont be fixable?

try linux mint because ubuntu will laggg and it cant mess your pc/windows
 

CtrlAltDelIrl

Senior Member
Mar 7, 2012
1,422
807
try linux mint because ubuntu will laggg and it cant mess your pc/windows

Not true! Yet again fotak-x you answers are not correct!

Linux Mint uses Ubuntu's Installer - They just change the slideshow during Install so it can mess up your windows install if the wrong choices are made.

If you have a lower spec machine that's no problem for Linux.. Try Linux Mint 11 LXDE

It flies on my old 1.6Ghz machine..

Linux is virtually impossible to break, meaning your system should run for years without ever having a problem.. If a problem ever does arrive, then it is easy to fix.

Usually to fix a linux system, we just pop in a livecd and boot from it..

Once at the desktop open a terminal and type:

fsck /dev/sdaX where X is the partition your linux install is on. Simples!

This will run a filesystem check and repair if needed.. In 12 years I have never lost data on a linux setup.

We also have a program called Remastersys which can make a livecd of your complete install which is essential.

You can then use it to install on any computer, with your app choices, settings etc in about 10 mins..

Much easier than a reinstall of windows which takes me, on average, 8 hrs including all drivers, windows updates, app choices etc..

And, if your windows ever fails, you'll still be able to access your files from within Linux!
 

fotak-x

Senior Member
May 17, 2012
3,305
693
Varaždin /dev/null
Not true! Yet again fotak-x you answers are not correct!

Linux Mint uses Ubuntu's Installer - They just change the slideshow during Install so it can mess up your windows install if the wrong choices are made.

If you have a lower spec machine that's no problem for Linux.. Try Linux Mint 11 LXDE

It flies on my old 1.6Ghz machine..

Linux is virtually impossible to break, meaning your system should run for years without ever having a problem.. If a problem ever does arrive, then it is easy to fix.

Usually to fix a linux system, we just pop in a livecd and boot from it..

Once at the desktop open a terminal and type:

fsck /dev/sdaX where X is the partition your linux install is on. Simples!

This will run a filesystem check and repair if needed.. In 12 years I have never lost data on a linux setup.

We also have a program called Remastersys which can make a livecd of your complete install which is essential.

You can then use it to install on any computer, with your app choices, settings etc in about 10 mins..

Much easier than a reinstall of windows which takes me, on average, 8 hrs including all drivers, windows updates, app choices etc..

And, if your windows ever fails, you'll still be able to access your files from within Linux!

ok if you installing trugh wubi you cant mess windows because wubi edit only your windows bootloader
if you pick to not install on windows drive (c) wubi will put system files on d drive and 2 files in c drive
and so what if mint use ubuntu installer. ubuntu is based on debian just like mint
 

stamatis

Retired Forum Moderator
Feb 5, 2012
2,840
1,110
stamatis∈A, A=∅
Not true! Yet again fotak-x you answers are not correct!

Linux Mint uses Ubuntu's Installer - They just change the slideshow during Install so it can mess up your windows install if the wrong choices are made.

If you have a lower spec machine that's no problem for Linux.. Try Linux Mint 11 LXDE

It flies on my old 1.6Ghz machine..

Linux is virtually impossible to break, meaning your system should run for years without ever having a problem.. If a problem ever does arrive, then it is easy to fix.

Usually to fix a linux system, we just pop in a livecd and boot from it..

Once at the desktop open a terminal and type:

fsck /dev/sdaX where X is the partition your linux install is on. Simples!

This will run a filesystem check and repair if needed.. In 12 years I have never lost data on a linux setup.

We also have a program called Remastersys which can make a livecd of your complete install which is essential.

You can then use it to install on any computer, with your app choices, settings etc in about 10 mins..

Much easier than a reinstall of windows which takes me, on average, 8 hrs including all drivers, windows updates, app choices etc..

And, if your windows ever fails, you'll still be able to access your files from within Linux!

ok,thanks, i guess by " we just pop in a livecd and boot from it.." you mean you boot it by bios,so my question,when you customise your computer you dont mess with bios so whatever you do it will be fixable,is that right?
 

sgt. meow

Senior Member
Dec 21, 2011
4,431
2,980
22
Dhaka
wubi installs Ubuntu as a virtual disk. if you navigate to the place where you installed Ubuntu through wubi in windows you will see a file called root.disk. if you delete that your wubi installation of Ubuntu is removed. if you install through wubi i suggest installing Ubuntu in some drive other than the one Windows is installed in, just to be on the safe side.
 

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  • 12
    Hey guys :) I'm sure many of you have seen and at least attempted eagleeyetom's thread on building a ROM. In the 2nd post, B.Jay helped explain how to set up a VM (Virtual Machine). Now I'm here to explain how to set up a distro and be able to dual-boot into Ubuntu/Linux Mint or Windows.

    Why would you want to do so ? Linux is more "Android friendly", compared to Windows especially if you want to compile your own ROMS from source :). Plus, wouldn't you want to try something besides Windows for a change :D ?

    Notes : I have tried only Ubuntu 12.04 and Linux Mint 13. From my experiance, it's easier to set up Ubuntu but unless your PC has some serious specs, it won't be a pleasant OS to use ;) I urge many to use Linux Mint over Ubuntu, since it's more forgiving on simple spec PC's.

    Requirements

    -3. Brain
    -2. Presence of mind - to think
    -1. Fingers
    0. Ability to consider Google as your friend who actualy studies and has vast knowledge
    1. A PC :rolleyes:
    2. At least a 2GHZ, dual core CPU.
    3. At least 2GB's of RAM
    4. 80GB of HD space (if you're thinking of getting into serious developing)

    As you can see, I'm basing these on my own PC's specs which I find can (barely) cope with dual-booting 2 OS'es (Ubuntu). Remember, these are considered bare minimum, especially when it comes to RAM. If you can, make sure you PC has these or better specs.

    Dictionary

    Before I begin, I'm gonna make a short dictionary on the simplified terms I'll be using

    1. OS = Operating System
    2. LMX = Linux Mint
    3. UBT = Ubuntu
    4. IMG = Image (.iso format)
    5. DB = Dual Boot

    Ubuntu

    This is probably the easiest OS to make DB-able. However, I do not recommend using Ubuntu if you're thinking of serious developing. Use this more like a stepping stone or a test drive in Linux OS'es

    1. Download WUBI (Windows Ubuntu Installer) from here.

    2. Run the .exe.

    3. You should end up with a window or GUI like this

    300px-Ubuntu_Wubi_11.10.PNG


    4. If you know what you're doing, you can configure the settings as you please. If not, just leave them as they are and just fill in your desired username and password.

    5. Hit next and leave it to download + install

    wubi_installing.png


    6. Finally, you'll end up with a finalization menu like this.

    Wubi


    7. Reboot.

    8 You should end up with a menu like this every time you boot your PC.

    WubiGuide


    9. And you're finished. :) enjoy.

    If that was confusing for you, here's a Youtube vid showing how to do it in real time. Thanks, whoever you are in the vid :)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SvOFUoFk_1U

    Linux Mint

    Now, this one is a bit tricky but you will not regret it :).

    1. Pick the flavour of your poison from here . I recommend Cinammon 64-bit version.

    2. Download it. Note : It's roughly 890+MB's, so prepare to wait a while :). Note : Make sure you check the iso after it has been downloaded to see if it's exactly the same size as it's written in the website. Sometimes, downloads get interrupted for various reasons and if you're even 1MB short of the actual size, it all fails from this point on.

    3. Download IMG Burner (here). It's like a Nero Burner for IMG's.

    4. Now, run the IMG Burner and make sure you have an empty DVD to burn the .iso into. Make sure it has enough space to fit the 890+MB .iso. Place the DVD into your tray, run the programme, select the .iso you wish to burn and start burning.

    5. After you're done, leave the DVD in the tray and reboot your PC.

    6. Now enter BIOS boot mode (press F12 when your PC's brand appears on the screen after rebooting) and select boot from CD/DVD.

    7. Let LMX finish installing in your PC and you will soon arrive at your Desktop. On your desktop, you will see three things ; Compter, Home and Installation CD (CD Icon).

    8. Click on the Icon and continue your installation.

    9. It will soon finish up and then you can enjoy your new OS :)

    10. See this video for more detailed info.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IPUX-0j5WCo

    Please See

    1. When I have time, I will tidy up and improve the instructions, especially the LMX section.
    2. Next few posts will explain how to get UBT or LMX more X8 friendly :) (getting flashtool to work on it, etc)
    3. Try all of this at you own risk. I won't be held responsible for any damages that occur.
    4. This guide is meant to be used with eagleeyetom's Building CM7 guide as well as building from MiniCM sources :)
    5. If you have any questions, IMMEDIATELY post it here before proceeding with your problem. Don't post any damages or side effects AFTER you do something w/o asking it here.

    Hope this helps someone out there explore the world of Linux :) or to take a break from Windows. Please share if it works for you :D
    5
    Getting Flashtool To Work On UBT/LMX

    This took some time but I managed to get Flashtool to work with our X8's/W8's in Linux. Remember, in Linux, TERMINAL is your new best friend ;) and lucky you, you'll need to use it quite a bit for this.

    1. Download Flashtool from here (Linux Edition)

    2. Extract the flashtool-0.x.x.x-linux.tar.7z. You'll be left with FlashTool.tar

    3. Extract the .tar.

    4. You'll be left with a folder called Flashtool.

    Hold your horses. You can use it now but try as you may, your X8/W8 will never connect to the PC. That's why we need to configure the system to be able to read it ;)

    1. Open terminal.

    2. Copy this into terminal :

    Code:
    $ gksudo gedit /etc/udev/rules.d/51-android.rules

    3. A text editor will appear. It will be blank. Not for long. Copy and paste ALL of these into that empty canvas.

    Code:
    #Acer
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0502", MODE="0666"
    
    #ASUS
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0b05", MODE="0666"
    
    #Dell
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="413c", MODE="0666"
    
    #Foxconn
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0489", MODE="0666"
    
    #Garmin-Asus
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="091E", MODE="0666"
    
    #Google
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="18d1", MODE="0666"
    
    #HTC
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0bb4", MODE="0666"
    
    #Huawei
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="12d1", MODE="0666"
    
    #K-Touch
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="24e3", MODE="0666"
    
    #KT Tech
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="2116", MODE="0666"
    
    #Kyocera
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0482", MODE="0666"
    
    #Lenevo
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="17EF", MODE="0666"
    
    #LG
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="1004", MODE="0666"
    
    #Motorola
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="22b8", MODE="0666"
    
    #NEC
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0409", MODE="0666"
    
    #Nook
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="2080", MODE="0666"
    
    #Nvidia
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0955", MODE="0666"
    
    #OTGV
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="2257", MODE="0666"
    
    #Pantech
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="10A9", MODE="0666"
    
    #Philips
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0471", MODE="0666"
    
    #PMC-Sierra
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="04da", MODE="0666"
    
    #Qualcomm
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="05c6", MODE="0666"
    
    #SK Telesys
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="1f53", MODE="0666"
    
    #Samsung
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="04e8", MODE="0666"
    
    #Sharp
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="04dd", MODE="0666"
    
    #Sony Ericsson
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0fce", MODE="0666"
    
    #Toshiba
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="0930", MODE="0666"
    
    #ZTE
    SUBSYSTEM=="usb", ATTR{idVendor}=="19D2", MODE="0666"

    6. Close and save all changes.

    7. Then, copy this into terminal :

    Code:
    $ sudo chmod a+r /etc/udev/rules.d/51-android.rules

    8. Done :) enjoy the ease of not having to switch back and forth between Windows and Linux just to compile and flash kernels.

    Overview

    What did you do ?

    You downloaded and extracted Flashtool. However, without the USB configured, it wouldn't connect with our phones. Plus, I'm sure you noticed there were other brands listed as well (#ACER, #HTC, etc.). This is used for compiling ROMs for other devices :) congrats. Have fun !
    5
    Just a side note: since Mint is based on Ubuntu, I think you can 'dd' a iso file to a USB stick and boot from it, instead of burning ISO to DVD.

    Another side note: you can use Unetbootin to make a bootable usb from iso.
    2
    try linux mint because ubuntu will laggg and it cant mess your pc/windows

    Not true! Yet again fotak-x you answers are not correct!

    Linux Mint uses Ubuntu's Installer - They just change the slideshow during Install so it can mess up your windows install if the wrong choices are made.

    If you have a lower spec machine that's no problem for Linux.. Try Linux Mint 11 LXDE

    It flies on my old 1.6Ghz machine..

    Linux is virtually impossible to break, meaning your system should run for years without ever having a problem.. If a problem ever does arrive, then it is easy to fix.

    Usually to fix a linux system, we just pop in a livecd and boot from it..

    Once at the desktop open a terminal and type:

    fsck /dev/sdaX where X is the partition your linux install is on. Simples!

    This will run a filesystem check and repair if needed.. In 12 years I have never lost data on a linux setup.

    We also have a program called Remastersys which can make a livecd of your complete install which is essential.

    You can then use it to install on any computer, with your app choices, settings etc in about 10 mins..

    Much easier than a reinstall of windows which takes me, on average, 8 hrs including all drivers, windows updates, app choices etc..

    And, if your windows ever fails, you'll still be able to access your files from within Linux!
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