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Question How do you charge your phone when you first buy it? S21 Ultra 5G?

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eyeatoma

Senior Member
Jun 18, 2011
219
24
Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra
How are we supposed to charge the phone? Do I let it drain all the way to zero the first few times, to "calibrate it" and then try to keep it between 80 and 30 percent?

I've heard getting to go all the way to zero is really bad? It also causes the battery to heat up a lot when it's being recharged?
I've gone through one charge cycle so far. And charged it at 11%. I wanted to let it go to 1%, but chose not to.

Someone help me with this. What is the best way to treat the battery when you first get it?
 

mzsquared

Senior Member
Feb 22, 2018
625
250
CT
What is the best way to treat the battery when you first get it?

I just charge it when it goes low and I have time to plug it in. I don't have a specific preferences, whether @ 30, 20 or 15% regardless. I don't think there are any special requirements for that, though I see ppl create their own beliefs and the'd swear to it as "the most optimal charging routine".
 
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dscline

Senior Member
Sep 19, 2007
643
133
Atlanta, GA USA
I did charge it up to 100% when new, then let it get down to about 25%, but generally I try to keep my phones as close to 50 as possible, with shorter frequent charges. I have wireless chargers on my desk at work and home, so it's simple to just set them there occasionally as needed. I have fast wireless charging turned off to keep heat down, and an app on the phone with an alarm that goes off when the charge hits 75%, but I'll often take it off closer to 60 if it's convenient. I'll put it back on around 40%. I'll charge it up further if I'm going to be out for a long day, and will plug it in if I need a faster charge. https://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/how_to_prolong_lithium_based_batteries
 

nixnixnixnix4

Senior Member
Mar 15, 2021
343
67
I did charge it up to 100% when new, then let it get down to about 25%, but generally I try to keep my phones as close to 50 as possible, with shorter frequent charges. I have wireless chargers on my desk at work and home, so it's simple to just set them there occasionally as needed. I have fast wireless charging turned off to keep heat down, and an app on the phone with an alarm that goes off when the charge hits 75%, but I'll often take it off closer to 60 if it's convenient. I'll put it back on around 40%. I'll charge it up further if I'm going to be out for a long day, and will plug it in if I need a faster charge. https://batteryuniversity.com/learn/article/how_to_prolong_lithium_based_batteries
I keep it around 40% at home.
I even have a 1W charger LOL. It can do 40 to 100% in 8 hours! Perfect for sleep.
 

nightoooo

Senior Member
Jun 17, 2016
72
30
Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra
NO. NO. It's 30-80%.
Better yet: 37-65%. Or, if you want to be dangerous: 35-65%.

or better to not have a smart phone at all if people get so picky!!

Guys, just do as the phone tells you, when it reaches 15% .. put it on charger until 100%. It gonna last at least 1-1,5 year before you notice the degradation of the battery.
 

neilth

Senior Member
Mar 26, 2015
64
20
Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra
I use the AccuBattery app with IFTTT and a smart plug for the charger. I set AccuBattery to create a notification when battery charge reaches 76%. This creates a notification saying to disconnect the charger once a 76% charge is reached. The Android device service in the IFTTT app sees this notification and then IFTTT sends an order to the smart plug’s app telling it to turn off the smart plug. I have been using this configyration for several years and it works like a charm. My previous phone, a Pixel 2 XL, has never been charged to 100% and after 2 1/2 years of use the battery is still working fine.
 
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blackhawk

Senior Member
Jun 23, 2020
4,172
1,097
My 10+ lasted 1.5 years of heavy usage.
It then failed. Don't delude yourself as to the longevity of Li's. You may do better or worse.
Batteries are cheap and relatively easy to replace. A Li failure can total the phone.
Regardless how long it last once it's capacity is less than 80% of it new capacity it's time to replace it.
Degraded Li's are more likely to fail.
Signs of failure; sharp drop in capacity in a short amount of time, erratic fast charging, case bulging ie battery swelling which can damage the display or worse.

There's no reason to discharge below 20% except to calibrate. Charging beyond 90% takes too long and is stressful on the battery.
Li's prefer frequent midrange power cycling. This isn't a NicCad or a lead acid so forget those rules. 40-70% is near ideal.

Charging start temp should be 82°F or above.
NEVER attempt to charge one that is 40°F or less.
Avoid letting charge temperature go much over 100°F.
Regardless of the charger or time, it will stop charging at 100%... if you insist.

I use midrange power cyvling with a fast charger because it's quick and convenient, more bang for the buck. If I replace this battery next month I really don't care as at this point it's just routine maintenance to me.
 

blackhawk

Senior Member
Jun 23, 2020
4,172
1,097
Here we go again. No, they're not easy to replace for the average Joe.
Don't make me laugh too hard... I was once like you. Have someone do it for you. I got mine done for $50 and learned.
There's not many phones that are harder than the 10+ to replace the battery.
And it's a cake walk🤗

Replacing the LCD screens on my 5D and MK3 were harder only because you need to line up the one time use wrap around rubber skin perfectly the first time when reassembling.
Still intimidated?🤣
 
Don't make me laugh too hard... I was once like you. Have someone do it for you. I got mine done for $50 and learned.
There's not many phones that are harder than the 10+ to replace the battery.
And it's a cake walk🤗

Replacing the LCD screens on my 5D and MK3 were harder only because you need to line up the one time use wrap around rubber skin perfectly the first time when reassembling.
Still intimidated?🤣
It's difficult to buy genuine batteries in many countries. Most people would rather have an original battery from the manufacturer last longer than have it degrade and replace it with something from a questionable source. Again, the discussion here is how to minimise battery degradation and prolong it's life rather than learn how to replace a battery.

Analogy: If someone asks a question like "How should I drive my car so that the engine doesn't wear out fast and lasts longer?" To suggest that you should not cultivate good driving habits, and abuse the engine, then replace it in a year isn't going to help. This kind of approach may work for someone who like to drift and drag-race or race but not for the average person who likes to take good care of his/her stuff.

Everyone knows that when something fails and stops working, it needs to be replaced. But that isn't what we are discussing here. We'd like to prolong it's life and prevent premature failure.
 

neilth

Senior Member
Mar 26, 2015
64
20
Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra
About a month ago I went on the Samsung Members app and put in a request that they add the ability to terminate charging at a user selectable charge level in their Bixby Routines. I then called their tech support 800 number provided in the Samsung Members app and verbally made the same request. The person I spoke with thought it was a great idea. I have never heard back from Samsung about them implementing such a feature though. It would possibly help if they received many more similar requests. If it was a popular request they would be more likely to add it the their software.
 

blackhawk

Senior Member
Jun 23, 2020
4,172
1,097
It's difficult to buy genuine batteries in many countries. Most people would rather have an original battery from the manufacturer last longer than have it degrade and replace it with something from a questionable source. Again, the discussion here is how to minimise battery degradation and prolong it's life rather than learn how to replace a battery.

Analogy: If someone asks a question like "How should I drive my car so that the engine doesn't wear out fast and lasts longer?" To suggest that you should not cultivate good driving habits, and abuse the engine, then replace it in a year isn't going to help. This kind of approach may work for someone who like to drift and drag-race or race but not for the average person who likes to take good care of his/her stuff.

Everyone knows that when something fails and stops working, it needs to be replaced. But that isn't what we are discussing here. We'd like to prolong it's life and prevent premature failure.
The worst thing you can do is not change out a degraded Li. You risk destroying the whole phone. Excuses are like...
You want to ration your cell usage?
Go for it.
I could add a whole list of things to prolong the battery life but it's not worth it.
The battery is flimsy, cost about $14 and was born to die. Parts are readily available especially a year after the release.

Even an amateur can change one out in less then an hour. Rear covers are about $16 but you won't break it if you don't rush it. But the details matter and you can't force parts or over torque screws, less is better. If you're really nervous practice on some scrape phones which aren't too hard to come by.
It's a lot easier than rotating a set of tires or changing a set of spark plugs.

Right off the top of my head, what you need:
Heat gun, fine tip tweezers (for the micro connectors), the proper micro drivers* (sold in kits just for this), plastic picks, sunction cup (optional), anhydrous isopropyl alcohol with a needle applicator syringe or bottle, OEM adhesive seal for the rear cover and the battery. About $35-50:less the heat gun. Optical aids are optional. Keep room humidity greater than 50%.
Sounds intimidating but it's not. Learn by doing.


*use a magnet to magnetize them if they're not already.
 

mhammedali21

Member
Jun 20, 2021
9
1
How are we supposed to charge the phone? Do I let it drain all the way to zero the first few times, to "calibrate it" and then try to keep it between 80 and 30 percent?

I've heard getting to go all the way to zero is really bad? It also causes the battery to heat up a lot when it's being recharged?
I've gone through one charge cycle so far. And charged it at 11%. I wanted to let it go to 1%, but chose not to.

Someone help me with tKodi noxhis. What is the best way to treat the battery when you first get it?
I simply charge it when it goes low and i have time to plug it in. I don't have a particular preferences, whether or not @ 30, 20 or 15% regardless. I don't assume there are any unique necessities for that, though I see ppl create their own beliefs and the'd swear to it as "the most optimal charging recurring".
 
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    NO. NO. It's 30-80%.
    Better yet: 37-65%. Or, if you want to be dangerous: 35-65%.

    or better to not have a smart phone at all if people get so picky!!

    Guys, just do as the phone tells you, when it reaches 15% .. put it on charger until 100%. It gonna last at least 1-1,5 year before you notice the degradation of the battery.
    2
    What is the best way to treat the battery when you first get it?

    I just charge it when it goes low and I have time to plug it in. I don't have a specific preferences, whether @ 30, 20 or 15% regardless. I don't think there are any special requirements for that, though I see ppl create their own beliefs and the'd swear to it as "the most optimal charging routine".
    1
    At this point in battery tech i believe it doesn't matter. But a lot of ppl and articles suggest to keep phone in 20-80% range.
    1
    Using the same method as @nightoooo above.
    I'm only on my 2nd phone, first was $99.00 phone that lasted 3 years and now over 2 years into my Samsung A20 with no noticeable change in battery life.
    1
    I use the AccuBattery app with IFTTT and a smart plug for the charger. I set AccuBattery to create a notification when battery charge reaches 76%. This creates a notification saying to disconnect the charger once a 76% charge is reached. The Android device service in the IFTTT app sees this notification and then IFTTT sends an order to the smart plug’s app telling it to turn off the smart plug. I have been using this configyration for several years and it works like a charm. My previous phone, a Pixel 2 XL, has never been charged to 100% and after 2 1/2 years of use the battery is still working fine.