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How to make a PC Triple Boot Android, Windows 7 and Windows 10

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Droidriven

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pulkitaghi

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Jul 17, 2020
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Hi,

You can also use Virtualbox or other virtualization software to create multiple virtual machine and RUN them on a single machine.

If your computer has good amount of RAM, then you utilize this Virtualbox software. It really works fine. Instead of creating different partition, i think it will be much better option.

Thanks,
Hope it helsp :)
 
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Droidriven

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I am curious how to do it?
You can use 1 hard drive or 2 hard drives or 3 hard drives, it works the same regardless of how many you use. It's easily done with just 1 hard drive. If you look at my previous post a few posts back in this thread, you will see a link with instructions to partition your hard drive to create a partition for each of the OS's that you want to install, then you install each operating system in each separate partition that you choose to install them in.

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mdakashhossain

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Sep 22, 2020
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How to make a PC Triple Boot Android, Windows 7 and Windows 10

Windows booting is a simple process. You can easily boot your windows 7 OR Windows 10
you can useing some free tools for booting window 10 and windows 7.
I can explained here how to boot a drive easily. I think it will benefit you. For than messege me personally.
Thank you very much.:D
 

Droidriven

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Jan 27, 2014
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Windows booting is a simple process. You can easily boot your windows 7 OR Windows 10

you can useing some free tools for booting window 10 and windows 7.

I can explained here how to boot a drive easily. I think it will benefit you. For than messege me personally.

Thank you very much.:D
You don't understand what they are trying to do.

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Nipun0000

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Dec 13, 2020
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So you want to use Windows 10, Windows 7 and Android on PC. For that first create 3 or 4 partitions one for windows 10, one for windows 7 and one for android. Install Windows 10 and Windows 7 on separate partitions and you will see that you have a option to boot into windows 7 or 10. now to install Android use a android based OS such as Prime OS and install it on a separate partition. You can use the pre installed grub or you can use grub2win to get all operating systems that you need
 

ptba2111

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Dec 24, 2014
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How to make a PC Triple Boot Android, Windows 7 and Windows 10

Windows booting is a simple process. You can easily boot your windows 7 OR Windows 10
you can useing some free tools for booting window 10 and windows 7.
I can explained here how to boot a drive easily. I think it will benefit you. For than messege me personally.
Thank you very much.:D





Hey there I'm also interested in this I currently have garuda Linux and can't get Windows 10 on
 

Flash-ARMy

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Jul 17, 2016
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I've done this for a while, my easiest solution is:

1. Make 3 or 4 partitions. Windows 10, windows 7, data partition, and a Linux partition. (There may more created e.g. a system partition). Dont touch the data partition throughout all of this except for storing your OS ISO, liveboot ISO, other program files etc.

2. Install windows 7 on windows 7 partition.

3. Install windows 10 on windows 10 partition. Can be installed from windows 7. Let windows handle making a windows bootloader which can now boot into windows 7 or 10.

4. Create a live USB in ine of your windows. I've been using Ubuntu but used Fedora for years prior. If you aren't sure if you need x64 then go woth the 32 bit x86 architecture (useful to be able to boot on 32 and 64 bit machines). Now boot up your live USB into Linux and install automatically onto Linux partition. You'll now have a GRUB bootloader which can boot into Linux or into your windows bootloader.

5. Install android emulator. I used Linux as I felt I would get better performance emulating android in Linux, this may or may not be true.

There will things that you might find as a nuisance, for example when I boot into windows 7 from windows 10, I need to boot into the GRUB to windows bootloader, select windows 7 and it reboots again back into GRUB and then into windows 7. Not a big deal unless you want to switch OS a lot. If this is the case, you may want to just emulate to begin with. I have a laptop with *ok* processor and RAM, not the best for emulating another OS.

There is many options - you could even install Linux within windows if you so choose. Ultimately the best path will be based on your knowledge, specs of your PC ( power, ram, disk space, disk type [fora mount of partitions], BIOS/UEFI, etc. The method I laid out is the most automated and easiest method I have come up with. Don't try installing windows on top of Linux, you'll cause a headache fixing everything for your Linux system. But then again, everything I've done in Linux the hard way has helped me to understand Linux better. I've just found that even laying out all of the partitions manually for Linux can be challenging, especially if you only have 1 computer and your data is not backed up elsewhere. Start with a blank machine if you can, and have another computer on hand, then you'll have an easy time starting over if necessary. Theres still so many more options of how to do what you are asking... good luck and happy tripple booting 🙂
 
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Droidriven

Senior Member
Jan 27, 2014
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Verizon Samsung Galaxy S III
HTC Thunderbolt
I've done this for a while, my easiest solution is:

1. Make 3 or 4 partitions. Windows 10, windows 7, data partition, and a Linux partition. (There may more created e.g. a system partition). Dont touch the data partition throughout all of this except for storing your OS ISO, liveboot ISO, other program files etc.

2. Install windows 7 on windows 7 partition.

3. Install windows 10 on windows 10 partition. Can be installed from windows 7. Let windows handle making a windows bootloader which can now boot into windows 7 or 10.

4. Create a live USB in ine of your windows. I've been using Ubuntu but used Fedora for years prior. If you aren't sure if you need x64 then go woth the 32 bit x86 architecture (useful to be able to boot on 32 and 64 bit machines). Now boot up your live USB into Linux and install automatically onto Linux partition. You'll now have a GRUB bootloader which can boot into Linux or into your windows bootloader.

5. Install android emulator. I used Linux as I felt I would get better performance emulating android in Linux, this may or may not be true.

There will things that you might find as a nuisance, for example when I boot into windows 7 from windows 10, I need to boot into the GRUB to windows bootloader, select windows 7 and it reboots again back into GRUB and then into windows 7. Not a big deal unless you want to switch OS a lot. If this is the case, you may want to just emulate to begin with. I have a laptop with *ok* processor and RAM, not the best for emulating another OS.

There is many options - you could even install Linux within windows if you so choose. Ultimately the best path will be based on your knowledge, specs of your PC ( power, ram, disk space, disk type [fora mount of partitions], BIOS/UEFI, etc. The method I laid out is the most automated and easiest method I have come up with. Don't try installing windows on top of Linux, you'll cause a headache fixing everything for your Linux system. But then again, everything I've done in Linux the hard way has helped me to understand Linux better. I've just found that even laying out all of the partitions manually for Linux can be challenging, especially if you only have 1 computer and your data is not backed up elsewhere. Start with a blank machine if you can, and have another computer on hand, then you'll have an easy time starting over if necessary. Theres still so many more options of how to do what you are asking... good luck and happy tripple booting 🙂
Yes, exactly what I was indirectly suggesting. I've done it the way you describe before, but, alternatively, you can just create 2 partitions on your hard drive then install Win10 and Win7 in those partitions then create a Linux live USB or even install a full Linux distro on a fairly large USB flashdrive/external hard drive(preferably something that has solid state storage, this enables faster booting and performance and allows installing drivers and packages) and then go into BIOS and set your boot priority to boot from USB first, save changes and exit. Then, when you want to boot Linux you just connect your external drive/USB then reboot the device and it will automatically boot Linux without having to use grub and when the Linux drive isn't connected you will be able to boot 10 and 7 via windows bootloader. A little more round about but makes booting back and forth between operating systems.
 

Flash-ARMy

New member
Jul 17, 2016
3
1
Yes, exactly what I was indirectly suggesting. I've done it the way you describe before, but, alternatively, you can just create 2 partitions on your hard drive then install Win10 and Win7 in those partitions then create a Linux live USB or even install a full Linux distro on a fairly large USB flashdrive/external hard drive(preferably something that has solid state storage, this enables faster booting and performance and allows installing drivers and packages) and then go into BIOS and set your boot priority to boot from USB first, save changes and exit. Then, when you want to boot Linux you just connect your external drive/USB then reboot the device and it will automatically boot Linux without having to use grub and when the Linux drive isn't connected you will be able to boot 10 and 7 via windows bootloader. A little more round about but makes booting back and forth between operating systems.
I had a project to run Windoes 10 on an SD card, which proved to be more difficult than I tbought it would be. I didn't think it should have been difficult, but it seems software amd hard tales measures to prevent this from being possible / "easy". Linux is quite easy to use a live USB, so I've done that quite a bit (I'd keep a 32 bit live USB on my Keychain). I don't think I was ever able to update drivers or install updates to the live USB, however I didn't make much of an effort too. I basically used it as a save my ass tool, which it certainly did come in useful quite often in the course of my personal/school/work computer needs.
 

Droidriven

Senior Member
Jan 27, 2014
14,907
1
5,182
NC
Verizon Samsung Galaxy S III
HTC Thunderbolt
I had a project to run Windoes 10 on an SD card, which proved to be more difficult than I tbought it would be. I didn't think it should have been difficult, but it seems software amd hard tales measures to prevent this from being possible / "easy". Linux is quite easy to use a live USB, so I've done that quite a bit (I'd keep a 32 bit live USB on my Keychain). I don't think I was ever able to update drivers or install updates to the live USB, however I didn't make much of an effort too. I basically used it as a save my ass tool, which it certainly did come in useful quite often in the course of my personal/school/work computer needs.
Instead of installing Linux live on USB, you can do a full installation of Linux on the USB the same as you would when installing Linux on hard drive. A Live USB can be setup with a persist partition to provide a bit of storage on the USB but it isn't enough to do anything with that is useful, that is why it is better to just install the distro on USB instead of using USB to run Linux live.
 

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