How to Root and set up a new Nook Glowlight 3

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Mar 19, 2012
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HELP! I DID THIS A LONG TIME AGO AND NOW MY NOOK GLOWLIGHT 3 IS STUCK ON THE LOADING SCREEN!

Don't worry, this is fixable. What's happened is that Barnes and Noble pushed out a system update that undid almost everything except that part that breaks the boot animation thing (specifically it overwrites the directory with everything that gives you root access and a working boot animation, but left your custom launcher in place).

All you have to do is re-do most of the steps above. Start from the "to root" step - even if the device is stuck on a boot animation, you should still be able to use adb. After redoing the steps, your GL3 should work normally again.

Unfortunately it looks like this is going to happen every time B&N pushes a system update, but that's not that often.
Is there a way to get past the boot animation without adb? I know I did this before with adb for the last update, but now I'm getting "unauthorized", I must have done it from a different computer, but I can't find the downloaded files on any of my computers, or I maybe the file was still on the nook, and I just re did the move. I don't remember. But now I can't get access. It shows up as BNRV520 in device manager, if i push buttons/tap on the screen, it mounts as usb and I can see the files. I also tried booting to fastboot/recovery, with power+n, to start over, but it doesn't show any options. It shows the boot screen(sometimes), but never switches to the boot animation. It shows up as i.mx6sl NTX Smart Device when plugged in. I tried other button combinations as suggested in https://forum.xda-developers.com/t/bricked-nook-glowlight-3.3749869/ but I didn't get any different results.
 
Mar 19, 2012
11
2
Is there a way to get past the boot animation without adb? I know I did this before with adb for the last update, but now I'm getting "unauthorized", I must have done it from a different computer, but I can't find the downloaded files on any of my computers, or I maybe the file was still on the nook, and I just re did the move. I don't remember. But now I can't get access. It shows up as BNRV520 in device manager, if i push buttons/tap on the screen, it mounts as usb and I can see the files. I also tried booting to fastboot/recovery, with power+n, to start over, but it doesn't show any options. It shows the boot screen(sometimes), but never switches to the boot animation. It shows up as i.mx6sl NTX Smart Device when plugged in. I tried other button combinations as suggested in https://forum.xda-developers.com/t/bricked-nook-glowlight-3.3749869/ but I didn't get any different results.
I managed to get past the broken boot screen by holding the power button long enough to show the "power off" menu. "Cancel" brought up the "choose home" menu. I'm not sure why I didn't get that before. I certainly fiddled with the power button many times in my previous attempts.
 

BJT207

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Just a question, does anyone know of a way to upgrade the version of android to something a bit newer like android 7? 4.4.2 is very restrictive for installing aplications
 

Renate

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Just a question, does anyone know of a way to upgrade the version of android to something a bit newer like android 7? 4.4.2 is very restrictive for installing aplications
No, that would be a bit of an undertaking.
I'm no fiend for getting the "latest & greatest Android version", but 4.4.2 is awfully long in the tooth.
The latest Nook "Glowlight Plus" (2021) is Android 8.
My real reader is an Onyx Poke3. I couldn't say offhand what advantage the Android 10 has over Android 8.
On the other hand I can say what the benefits (for me) of the Poke3 over the Glow '21 are.
Octo core vs quad core
Qualcomm SoC vs Allwinner SoC
USB 3.0 vs USB 2.0
Flush front vs bezel
 

BJT207

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May 26, 2021
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m
No, that would be a bit of an undertaking.
I'm no fiend for getting the "latest & greatest Android version", but 4.4.2 is awfully long in the tooth.
The latest Nook "Glowlight Plus" (2021) is Android 8.
My real reader is an Onyx Poke3. I couldn't say offhand what advantage the Android 10 has over Android 8.
On the other hand I can say what the benefits (for me) of the Poke3 over the Glow '21 are.
Octo core vs quad core
Qualcomm SoC vs Allwinner SoC
USB 3.0 vs USB 2.0
Flush front vs bezel
That makes sense. I only asked because someone (allegedly) did it for the nook HD edition. I was considering just giving it a whirl and seeing if it worked but I'm 100% sure that would just brick the device as outlined by every warning in the instruction manuals.
 

nmyshkin

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Nov 21, 2013
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m

That makes sense. I only asked because someone (allegedly) did it for the nook HD edition. I was considering just giving it a whirl and seeing if it worked but I'm 100% sure that would just brick the device as outlined by every warning in the instruction manuals.
The Nook Color, Tablet, and HD have a long history of Cyanogenmod (now Lineage) development of custom ROMs. But even they have pretty much come to a standstill. It takes a nucleus of truly dedicated enthusiasts to do something like that. Also, the stock tablets themselves were not so "stripped" as the Nook Readers, so it was easier to work with things that were already there.

I won't say "not gonna happen" with the readers because someone has developed alternative firmware for the Glow series, but it's still the same Android version.
 
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Shagbark

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It took me two full days to set up my Glowlight 3+ (7.8", BNRV700), mostly because certain basic information isn't given anywhere on the web that I could find, because f-droid & RelaunchX aren't really documented. This comment is
  • to note the awful things about the 3+ that you can't find in the ads
  • to confirm that you can install apps on the Glowlight 3+
  • to spell out some of the simple but necessary bits of info that aren't spelled out anywhere I could find
  • to ask 4 questions that I haven't solved by myself
I bought the 3+ just to read PDFs in landscape mode. The print in journal articles is too small to read them in portrait mode, even on this 7.8" e-reader. (Using a magnifier is too slow.)

My first problem was that the Nook, using its factory software, couldn't see any of the files I transferred to it via USB. It turns out--and this isn't documented anywhere that I found, and I searched for it a long time--that to sideload books onto the Glowlight 3+, you have to create directories (that don't exist beforehand) inside the directory /NOOK with specific names: Books, Documents, and My Files. (These directories all pre-existed on earlier Nooks, at least on the NST.) By /NOOK I don't mean the top level of your Nook as it shows up in Windows Explorer; I mean you make new directories inside the NOOK directory that's already in your Nook's root directory. As far as I can tell, there's no difference between Books, Documents, and My Files. Maybe the Nook store puts different kinds of books that you buy in different directories.

There's also an "Everything else" choice, which doesn't seem to be located on the Nook at all; for me it listed nothing but one book, which definitely wasn't anywhere on my Nook 'coz I didn't put it there. I'd bought it for a Kindle years ago, and I think the Nook found some mention of it thru my Adobe ID?

I was then shocked to learn that the Glowlight 3+, unlike earlier Nooks, ignores the directory structure of your files. I put a few thousand books on it, organized in about a hundred directories, sub-directories, and etc.; and they were all treated as if they were in one directory. There was no way to organize them unless I wanted to take a week out of my life to move them all onto shelves (which would still suck).

No problem, I thought; I'll add topic prefixes to each file and then use Search to find all the books on one subject. Wrong again--the Search functionality on the 3+ is crippled. It ONLY SHOWS THE FIRST 4 RESULTS. There's no way to scroll through the rest. I'd just loaded about 60 books and articles on deep learning, 56 of which were inaccessible unless I wanted to spend half an hour every time I wanted to find one of them by paging down a few hundred screens through My Files.

Also, the 3+ software can't do landscape mode.

I came here to learn how to install something that could rotate PDFs. I tried to follow the instructions, but was terribly confused because, in all the docs I read here and RelaunchX and f-droid docs and discussions, nothing explained what a launcher was, or that f-droid wasn't a launcher. I spent several hours trying to figure out why I couldn't get f-droid to show up in the list of launchers. It's just a store, like Google Play.

I had a lot of trouble figuring out how to use adb. A few sticking points:
  • "Install adb" means install it on the desktop PC, not on the Nook.
  • (You don't really need to install it; you can unzip a file containing adb, like the Android Studio zip, anywhere, and run the binary platform-tools/adb.exe . But that becomes a pain, bcoz then with every package install, you have to type out either the path to adb, or to the package's .apk file.)
  • Android Studio comes with adb. Installing Android Studio on Windows will NOT put any of its tools on your %PATH%; you have to do that by hand (on Win10, under Settings > System > Advanced system settings > Environment variables). adb is in %ANDROID_HOME%\platform-tools , where %ANDROID_HOME% is where you installed Android Studio (you'd have to set that env var by hand to use it).
  • Every adb command is run on the PC, not on the Nook.
  • A file that ends with ".apk" is an Android package. (It's actually a zip file.)
  • When you install a package by typing "adb install foo.apk", you type that on the PC, where adb is installed, and the file foo.apk is ALSO on the PC, not on the Nook. You don't transfer files "by hand" first; adb copies everything needed from the .apk onto the Nook.
  • There is no device specification in the "adb install" command because it assumes you want to install things on whatever device is connected as "device". I don't know what it does if more than one is connected.
  • The Glowlight 3+ might run Android 4.4.2. I haven't found any confirmation of this--the user manual doesn't say, nor is it reported in device settings, nor have I found anyone claiming to know what version the 3+ runs. But plenty of people say the Glowlight 3 runs 4.4.2. The Glowlight 3+ will install packages requiring 4.2, and won't install ones that require 5.1 (such as the current f-droid).
I installed ADB on my Windows 10 machine and installed the RelaunchX 2.1.5 apk from f-droid.org as instructed in the first post in this thread. I was then able to use RelaunchX on the Nook, and used Rotation Manager (com.spydiko.rotationmanager_foss_18) to lock it into landscape mode. I didn't root the Nook, because I don't know what the purpose of "rooting" is, and RelaunchX worked without doing it.

I then had these problems:

1. RelaunchX, unlike the Nook software, would let me navigate the directory tree, but it was hard to find the directories that Windows Explorer showed as being on my Nook. They're there, under /storage/spsd .

2. The RelaunchX virtual keyboard, used to type things like passwords, doesn't work in landscape mode. It maps screen touches to the wrong keys, and the far-right keys--which includes the delete key--can't be used. Touching the backspace key enters an 'n'.

3. Opening any PDF in landscape mode crashes the Nook.

4. Something got my Nook into an unbootable state, such that any attempt to boot it would hang looping the Nook "LOADING" animation endlessly. I still don't know what caused this; it went away when I used adb to uninstall everything that I'd installed. (Use adb shell pm list packages to see a list of packages. To remove one, adb uninstall [everything after "package:"].)

I realized I had to install a separate PDF viewer. I eventually settled on Orion Viewer. Since Orion Viewer (unlike the Nook software!) could navigate the directory tree on the Nook, I didn't need RelaunchX. I now use the much-simpler Text Launcher (ademar.textlauncher_8). [UPDATE: I just switched to Koreader, which is fantastic, and doesn't require your device to have a hardware go-back key.]

I never rooted the Nook. Maybe my weird problems with RelaunchX were due to not rooting it. I don't know what "rooting" does.

Remaining problems:
  • I would like very much to get the Nook to go straight to Text Launcher when I boot it. Booting the Nook launcher takes a LONG time, and I don't want to use it except on epubs. Also, pressing the upside-down U just hard enough to get the launcher menu, but not so long that it interprets it as dimming the screen instead (and I have to wait a long time to know which thing it did). After the lengthy boot, it takes me on average maybe 10 seconds of fiddling with the nook U button to launch Text Launcher. Same story every time I want to switch apps or view a different PDF. It gets annoying.
  • Every PDF viewer, and most other apps, at some point rely on the Android device having a "go back" button, like all Android phones and no e-readers do. With Orion Viewer, if you change anything in Settings, you're stuck; you can't go back to choose a file to view. You can go back to Text Launcher and choose Orion Viewer again, and it will take you back to the main menu. With others I tried, you have to reboot the Nook whenever you change any setting. I'd like to be able to map one of the Nook buttons to be the Android "go back" button.
  • Orion Viewer has no "back" button to return from viewing one document, to go back to the main menu and choose another document. I think that every time I re-run Text Launcher to run Orion again to view another file, the process for the previous file is still running in the background. I'd like some way to (a) list running processes, and (b) kill running processes.
  • I still don't know what "rooting" is, or why I should do it. I read that you need to root the device to install packages with f-droid, but that's not true. I got F-droid Classic working fine.
 
Last edited:

atogurkan

Member
Aug 29, 2022
36
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  • Every PDF viewer, and most other apps, at some point rely on the Android device having a "go back" button, like all Android phones and no e-readers do. With Orion Viewer, if you change anything in Settings, you're stuck; you can't go back to choose a file to view. You can go back to Text Launcher and choose Orion Viewer again, and it will take you back to the main menu. With others I tried, you have to reboot the Nook whenever you change any setting. I'd like to be able to map one of the Nook buttons to be the Android "go back" button.
  • Orion Viewer has no "back" button to return from viewing one document, to go back to the main menu and choose another document. I think that every time I re-run Text Launcher to run Orion again to view another file, the process for the previous file is still running in the background. I'd like some way to (a) list running processes, and (b) kill running processes.
  • I still don't know what "rooting" is, or why I should do it. I read that you need to root the device to install packages with f-droid, but that's not true. I got F-droid Classic working fine.
Hello,

I do not have Glowlight 3+ (7.8", BNRV700) but these points, I can answer:
For back button you can install button savior, which will give you software buttons for "back" and much more. I use it and I am happy with it. Its functionality however, requires the so-called superuser privileges. Which brings us to your last point. "root" is the traditional username for the superuser on Unix and unix-like systems. "rooting" means that you enable access superuser privileges, by usually bypassing the ordinary way of providing the password for root user. This allows you, amongst other things, remount certain partitions, access and write to certain devices etc. If you try to do these as an ordinary user, the operating system will not allow. Very briefly in Unix, pretty much everything is a file and every file has an owner. Unless you are the owner of a file, you cannot write to it. For example, unless you are the owner of a directory, you cannot remove files from it. Superuser is the exception, that user can write to any file, so practically can do anything. This is of course dangerous, you can render your system useless, so normally its powers are restricted.
Another solution for back button might be an adaptation of @Renate 's advice here: https://forum.xda-developers.com/t/nook-glowlight-3.3698608/page-2#post-74475057 I do not know if it will work since I do not have access to an BNRV700, and in any case this requires remounting /system directory, which requires (you guessed it) superuser privileges. If you want to go this path, read the earlier messages in that thread for the files you need to modify etc.

Good luck!
 
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atogurkan

Member
Aug 29, 2022
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  • I would like very much to get the Nook to go straight to Text Launcher when I boot it. Booting the Nook launcher takes a LONG time, and I don't want to use it except on epubs. Also, pressing the upside-down U just hard enough to get the launcher menu, but not so long that it interprets it as dimming the screen instead (and I have to wait a long time to know which thing it did). After the lengthy boot, it takes me on average maybe 10 seconds of fiddling with the nook U button to launch Text Launcher. Same story every time I want to switch apps or view a different PDF. It gets annoying.
For this one, see https://forum.xda-developers.com/t/nook-glowlight-3.3698608/post-74587853
Again, I do not know if this will work, but it looks like a decent place to start.
 
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Renate

Recognized Contributor / Inactive Recognized Dev
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@Shagbark You seem to have a lot of trouble with your Glow. I hope that some of the standard things you've learned by now.
Yes, ADB supports multiple devices at a time but you have to differentiate them by serial number.
Code:
C:\>adb -s 12345678 shell
$ ls -l
At least I try to make it clear what you're typing to. "C:\>" means from the desktop (even if you are using Linux), "$" means to an unrooted shell, "#" means to a rooted shell.

You can remap the physical buttons on the Glows, it's all in /system/usr/keylayout

There's no reason anything should be taking 10 seconds to do on your device.

If you're in "NOOK" on your Windows File Explorer, you're running UMS.
Most people would not recommend that. It's bad technology and you are using a tiny "sandbox".
I use exclusively ADB (and my adbsync.exe utility) to sync things.

There are other readers besides the stock B&N readers. People have different tastes.
 
Last edited:

Shagbark

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Sep 9, 2022
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Code:
C:\>adb -s 12345678 shell
$ ls -l
At least I try to make it clear what you're typing to. "C:\>" means from the desktop (even if you are using Linux), "$" means to an unrooted shell, "#" means to a rooted shell.
I see now that I could have inferred that.

You can remap the physical buttons on the Glows, it's all in /system/usr/keylayout

I have no editor on the Nook with which to edit files. I installed Vimtouch, but apparently it isn't a command-line tool. Do you know a vim apk that I can install with adb -install, which will then work on the command line, on the Nook, after I run "adb shell" on my PC?

Also, I don't know which keyboard layout it's using, or how to tell it to use a different one, or what code maps the Nook buttons.

If you're in "NOOK" on your Windows File Explorer, you're running UMS.
Most people would not recommend that. It's bad technology and you are using a tiny "sandbox".
I use exclusively ADB (and my adbsync.exe utility) to sync things.


What do you mean by "sync things"? What might I want to sync my Nook with?
 

Renate

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You never have to edit on the Glow if you don't want to. Just pull the file, edit it on your desktop and push it back.

The file is /system/usr/keylayout/imx-keypad.kl
My version is:
Code:
key 116  POWER      WAKE
key 102  HOME       WAKE
key 191  MENU       # top left
key 192  BACK       # bottom left
key 193  PAGE_UP    # top right
key 194  PAGE_DOWN  # bottom right

I used to keep books on my Glow in the directory /sdcard/Books
I keep books on my desktop under C:\Books
I use adbsync.exe to sync the two directories.
Overdrive is a bit of a differnt theme.
 
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  • 2
    @Shagbark You seem to have a lot of trouble with your Glow. I hope that some of the standard things you've learned by now.
    Yes, ADB supports multiple devices at a time but you have to differentiate them by serial number.
    Code:
    C:\>adb -s 12345678 shell
    $ ls -l
    At least I try to make it clear what you're typing to. "C:\>" means from the desktop (even if you are using Linux), "$" means to an unrooted shell, "#" means to a rooted shell.

    You can remap the physical buttons on the Glows, it's all in /system/usr/keylayout

    There's no reason anything should be taking 10 seconds to do on your device.

    If you're in "NOOK" on your Windows File Explorer, you're running UMS.
    Most people would not recommend that. It's bad technology and you are using a tiny "sandbox".
    I use exclusively ADB (and my adbsync.exe utility) to sync things.

    There are other readers besides the stock B&N readers. People have different tastes.
    1
    m

    That makes sense. I only asked because someone (allegedly) did it for the nook HD edition. I was considering just giving it a whirl and seeing if it worked but I'm 100% sure that would just brick the device as outlined by every warning in the instruction manuals.
    The Nook Color, Tablet, and HD have a long history of Cyanogenmod (now Lineage) development of custom ROMs. But even they have pretty much come to a standstill. It takes a nucleus of truly dedicated enthusiasts to do something like that. Also, the stock tablets themselves were not so "stripped" as the Nook Readers, so it was easier to work with things that were already there.

    I won't say "not gonna happen" with the readers because someone has developed alternative firmware for the Glow series, but it's still the same Android version.
    1
    • Every PDF viewer, and most other apps, at some point rely on the Android device having a "go back" button, like all Android phones and no e-readers do. With Orion Viewer, if you change anything in Settings, you're stuck; you can't go back to choose a file to view. You can go back to Text Launcher and choose Orion Viewer again, and it will take you back to the main menu. With others I tried, you have to reboot the Nook whenever you change any setting. I'd like to be able to map one of the Nook buttons to be the Android "go back" button.
    • Orion Viewer has no "back" button to return from viewing one document, to go back to the main menu and choose another document. I think that every time I re-run Text Launcher to run Orion again to view another file, the process for the previous file is still running in the background. I'd like some way to (a) list running processes, and (b) kill running processes.
    • I still don't know what "rooting" is, or why I should do it. I read that you need to root the device to install packages with f-droid, but that's not true. I got F-droid Classic working fine.
    Hello,

    I do not have Glowlight 3+ (7.8", BNRV700) but these points, I can answer:
    For back button you can install button savior, which will give you software buttons for "back" and much more. I use it and I am happy with it. Its functionality however, requires the so-called superuser privileges. Which brings us to your last point. "root" is the traditional username for the superuser on Unix and unix-like systems. "rooting" means that you enable access superuser privileges, by usually bypassing the ordinary way of providing the password for root user. This allows you, amongst other things, remount certain partitions, access and write to certain devices etc. If you try to do these as an ordinary user, the operating system will not allow. Very briefly in Unix, pretty much everything is a file and every file has an owner. Unless you are the owner of a file, you cannot write to it. For example, unless you are the owner of a directory, you cannot remove files from it. Superuser is the exception, that user can write to any file, so practically can do anything. This is of course dangerous, you can render your system useless, so normally its powers are restricted.
    Another solution for back button might be an adaptation of @Renate 's advice here: https://forum.xda-developers.com/t/nook-glowlight-3.3698608/page-2#post-74475057 I do not know if it will work since I do not have access to an BNRV700, and in any case this requires remounting /system directory, which requires (you guessed it) superuser privileges. If you want to go this path, read the earlier messages in that thread for the files you need to modify etc.

    Good luck!
    1
    • I would like very much to get the Nook to go straight to Text Launcher when I boot it. Booting the Nook launcher takes a LONG time, and I don't want to use it except on epubs. Also, pressing the upside-down U just hard enough to get the launcher menu, but not so long that it interprets it as dimming the screen instead (and I have to wait a long time to know which thing it did). After the lengthy boot, it takes me on average maybe 10 seconds of fiddling with the nook U button to launch Text Launcher. Same story every time I want to switch apps or view a different PDF. It gets annoying.
    For this one, see https://forum.xda-developers.com/t/nook-glowlight-3.3698608/post-74587853
    Again, I do not know if this will work, but it looks like a decent place to start.
    1
    You never have to edit on the Glow if you don't want to. Just pull the file, edit it on your desktop and push it back.

    The file is /system/usr/keylayout/imx-keypad.kl
    My version is:
    Code:
    key 116  POWER      WAKE
    key 102  HOME       WAKE
    key 191  MENU       # top left
    key 192  BACK       # bottom left
    key 193  PAGE_UP    # top right
    key 194  PAGE_DOWN  # bottom right

    I used to keep books on my Glow in the directory /sdcard/Books
    I keep books on my desktop under C:\Books
    I use adbsync.exe to sync the two directories.
    Overdrive is a bit of a differnt theme.
  • 6
    I got tired of having to jump between a bunch of threads when setting up my Glowlight 3. So I'm consolidating directions into one post in the hopes that it'll save others time and trouble. Credit for instructions should go to the people who actually wrote them: arnchav of mobileread; RyogoNA, Silent eInk, cazar and Renate NST here on xda; and everyone who figured out the root exploit, sideloading, the devs behind Relaunch, RelaunchX and F-Droid. Material lifted from their original posts (linked at the bottom).

    Now, this is going to walk you through doing a few things:
    A) Setting up a progam called ADB on your computer so that it can talk to your NG3
    B) Adding a "Launcher" app to your nook so that you can access other apps you sideload later
    C) Root theNook so that you can do more stuff with the settings, including the ability to...
    D) Fix a bug that, after installing a launcher, causes the NG3 to get stuck on the loading screen after rebooting

    Before you start, you need to set up ADB on your computer. Follow the instructions linked here. The rest of this post will assume you're using Windows, but won't be hugely different from other OSs.

    Here we go:

    To set up ADB on your nook:

    1. On your Nook, go to Settings>About. You should see the serial number, app version, etc. At the top of that page, there is a nook icon. Tap that icon rapidly until the developer menu opens.
    2. Tap "Android Development Settings" and check the box for "USB debugging".
    3. At the Developer options screen you are on (where you checked the box), hit the back arrow at the top-left of the screen to go back. But do not exit the developer menu.
    4. On your computer, open a command prompt and navigate to the folder where you put adb (in my case I typed in "cd adb/platform-tools")
    5. Plug the USB in to the nook. When the nook prompts you to turn on USB mode, do so. At the adb command prompt, type adb devices. ADB should recognize the nook, but say that it is unauthorized.
    6. From windows, eject the nook to disconnect nook's file sharing. Once the nook's USB file sharing screen goes away, you should be able to see the developer menu again. Tap "Allow Debugging" one time! There will be no confirmation, just do it one time.
    6. Unplug the USB, plug it back in, turn on USB mode when prompted. Back in the command prompt, type adb devices again. This time it should see the device and simply say "device" where it used to say "unauthorized". Congratulations! You can now install a launcher.

    To install a launcher, like RelaunchX

    1. Download your launcher apk of choice. If you don't know what to pick, try RelaunchX, and download the latest version from plusz's thread here: https://www.mobileread.com/forums/showthread.php?t=284418 (n.b. To make things easy, ignore his suggestion to get it through F-Droid as you'll need a new launcher to use F-Droid in the first place. Just download the apk).
    2. In Command prompt, type adb install <filelocation>, where filelocation is the complete address of the apk. If you have file explorer open, you can just type adb install then a space, then drag the file in to the terminal and it will copy the location for you. (Make sure again that there is a space between "install" and the path or it won't work).
    3. ADB should do it's thing and you will get a "success" message in Terminal.
    4. Eject the nook from the PC. Shortly after the connection is cut, a window should open on the nook allowing you to select either the nook launcher or your new launcher. If you use RelaunchX, you may get a warning that it wasn't built with this device in mind. You can ignore it, it works great on this device.

    This is all great, except there's a bug in how B&N set up the device that only shows up if you install a new launcher. If you reboot the device, you'll be stuck on the boot animation until you do weird things like hold down the power button for a long time to pull up the reboot/power off options (only seems to sometimes work). To fix that, we actually have to disable, remove, or replace the boot animation file itself.

    To root:
    1. Download the modified Glowlight Plus script attached here ("rootGL3.zip" - almost identical to cazar's rooGLP-3 script package, but with one line changing the model number from 510 to 520)
    1. Enable USB debugging in Developer options
    2. Connect USB cable and make sure your nook is showing up in 'adb devices'
    3. Extract rootGLP.zip and run rootnook.cmd (or rootnook.sh on linux)

    To fix (read: disable) the buggy boot animation:
    1. Connect your nook to the computer again
    2. (windows) open a command prompt and and navigate to the folder that adb is in.
    3. Enter the following commands, in order:

    Code:
    adb shell
    su
    mount -o remount, rw /system
    mv /system/bin/bootanimation /system/bin/bootanimation.bak
    reboot

    OPTIONAL: To restore a working boot animation (steps above will replace broken boot animation with a black screen that goes away after a few seconds)
    1. Download the attached zip
    2. If it's not still connected, connect the Nook to the computer again and tap the button on the nook to turn on USB mode when prompted,
    3. On your computer, open up the Nook in Explorer(/Finder/your file manager of choice). Open up the NOOK Folder if you see one.
    4. Copy the file inside the zip (bootanimation) to that folder on the Nook.
    5. Eject the nook (as in, in windows, click the option to safely remove it as a device) but keep it physically connected
    6. Open a command prompt(/terminal/whatever you use for adb) and navigate to the folder that adb is in.
    7. Enter the following commands:

    Code:
    adb shell
    su
    mount -o rw,remount -t ext4 /dev/block/mmcblk0p5 /system
    cp /storage/spsd/NOOK/bootanimation /system/bin/bootanimation
    cd /system/bin
    chmod 755 bootanimation
    reboot

    You now have a rooted Nook Glowlight 3 that'll boot into a launcher of your choice! You can now sideload apks of your choice using adb the same way you installed RelaunchX.

    Have fun!

    Sources for these instructions:
    https://www.mobileread.com/forums/showpost.php?p=3632665&postcount=118 (how to sideload onto nook 3)
    https://forum.xda-developers.com/showpost.php?p=75717722&postcount=113 (same as above, diff user)
    https://www.mobileread.com/forums/showthread.php?p=3632665#post3632665 (to get RelaunchX)
    https://forum.xda-developers.com/showpost.php?p=64191791 (for nook GLP rooting script)
    https://forum.xda-developers.com/showpost.php?p=76042888&postcount=127 (to fix boot animation loop)


    HELP! I DID THIS A LONG TIME AGO AND NOW MY NOOK GLOWLIGHT 3 IS STUCK ON THE LOADING SCREEN!

    Don't worry, this is fixable. What's happened is that Barnes and Noble pushed out a system update that undid almost everything except that part that breaks the boot animation thing (specifically it overwrites the directory with everything that gives you root access and a working boot animation, but left your custom launcher in place).

    All you have to do is re-do most of the steps above. Start from the "to root" step - even if the device is stuck on a boot animation, you should still be able to use adb. After redoing the steps, your GL3 should work normally again.

    Unfortunately it looks like this is going to happen every time B&N pushes a system update, but that's not that often.
    2
    @Shagbark You seem to have a lot of trouble with your Glow. I hope that some of the standard things you've learned by now.
    Yes, ADB supports multiple devices at a time but you have to differentiate them by serial number.
    Code:
    C:\>adb -s 12345678 shell
    $ ls -l
    At least I try to make it clear what you're typing to. "C:\>" means from the desktop (even if you are using Linux), "$" means to an unrooted shell, "#" means to a rooted shell.

    You can remap the physical buttons on the Glows, it's all in /system/usr/keylayout

    There's no reason anything should be taking 10 seconds to do on your device.

    If you're in "NOOK" on your Windows File Explorer, you're running UMS.
    Most people would not recommend that. It's bad technology and you are using a tiny "sandbox".
    I use exclusively ADB (and my adbsync.exe utility) to sync things.

    There are other readers besides the stock B&N readers. People have different tastes.
    2
    I took another look at the Glow3, it's complicated.
    SD2 is actually connected to the WiFi.
    SD3 is connected to the test points.
    When you enable/disable WiFi the software enables/disables SD3!
    This is wrong. It's what had me jumping to conclusions.

    I'll see if I can get an SD card working on the Glow3.
    Then I'll see if I can config hwcfg or patch to have it enable/disable the right SD.

    Edit: Yes, I got the hardware working. See the specific thread.
    https://forum.xda-developers.com/nook-touch/general/adding-sd-card-to-glowlights-2-3-4-t3944830
    1
    Happy to report that the excellent instructions work great on the new 7.8" Glowlight Plus that got released yesterday. Change the model number to BNRV700 in the rootnook.cmd file and you're good to go!
    1
    Could not use ADB, "unauthorized" without device prompt

    On my 6" Nook 3, I had set up a launcher and Ankidroid, but a few months later I could not use ADB, rather I kept getting the "unauthorized" error without a device prompt.

    For those in the same situation, try opening the stock Nook reader app, then opening the top-down curtain and clicking Settings. From there, go into the About menu and click the Nook icon about a dozen times to get into the debugging screen. Now, click Disable Mass Storage, then click Allow Debugging.

    After this, I was able to use ADB to get a shell or install apps.