[I9003][MOD]Create Your Own Bootanimation (sanim.zip) (I9003 Gingerbread)

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AmirolAhmad

Senior Member
This thread is about on how to make your own bootanimation for your I9003 Gingerbread.



BASIC

Inside the sanim.zip file
If you extract the contents of the sanim.zip file to your computer, you will see:

- A desc.txt file
- A part0 folder (Contains PNG images named in incremental numbers)
More part1, part2 etc. folders (May or may not be present)

As you can see, sanim.zip merely contains one text file and one or more folders with PNG images. The animation is played simply by displaying the images in a sequence, and the text file defines how they are to be played. In essence, first the PNG files in the part0 folder are displayed one after the other and afterwards, those in the part1 file – if it exists – are displayed, again one after the other, and so on.

The folders
These contain PNG images named in numbers, starting from something like 0000.png or 00001.png and proceeding with increments of 1. There has to be at least one folder, and there is no known upper limit to the number of folders.

The desc.txt file
This file defines how the images in the folder(s) are displayed during the boot animation, in the following format:

Width Height Frame-rate
p Loop Pause Folder1
p Loop Pause Folder2

An example of a desc.txt file is:
480 800 30
p 1 0 part0
p 0 0 part1

As you can see, in the first line, 480 and 800 define the width and height of the boot animation in pixels for this example. This must be the same as the screen resolution of your device for the boot animation to properly play in full screen. 30 is the frame rate in fps (frames per second) i.e. number of images to display per second. (resolution for I9003 is 480x800)

The second and third lines have a same format, start with p, which stands for a part of the animation and end in part0 or part1, which denotes the folder in which the images for that part are present.

The number after ‘p’ defines how many times this part will loop (repeat playback) before switching to the next part (if present). Specifying 0 would make the part loop indefinitely till the phone has fully booted.

The next number is for the pause, and is expressed in the number of frames, which can be translated into time by dividing it by the frame rate. A pause of 15 for example, would mean pausing for the time it takes 15 frames to play and since the frame rate is 30 frames per second, 15 frames would take half a second.

Translating all of this in case of the above example, the boot animation will play at a resolution of 480 by 800 pixels, at a frame rate of 30 fps, starting with the contents of part0 folder and after playing them in one loop, switching to contents of part1 folder and playing them continuously till the device fully boots.

Note: Most high-end Android devices with large screens have a resolution of 480 x 800 pixels, and are referred to as HDPI. Some mid-range devices have a resolution of 320 x 480 pixels and are called MDPI. Lastly, the screen resolution of some low-end devices is 340 x 320 pixels and these are called LDPI.

Requirements:
1. A zip/unzip utility like 7-Zip
2. Image editor of your choice like Photoshop, GIMP, Paint.NET, and also MS Paint.
3. A plain text editor of your choice. Using Windows Notepad for editing text files that are to be used in Linux is not always a good idea, so use something like Notepad++ instead.
4. Creativity and Time
5. I9003 screen resolution is 480x800

Procedure:
1. Go through the entire inside the sanim.zip (Description on the top post, if you haven’t already done so)
2. Plan how your boot animation will run including how many distinct parts it will have, how long will each part play and what will be the sequence of the parts.
3. Make a new folder at any convenient location on your computer, and name it sanim.
4. In this folder, create a folder for each part of your boot animation, named part0, part1 and so on.
5. In the image editor of your choice, make all the image files for each part of your boot animation with the proper which is 480x800 equal to I9003 phone screen resolution, and save them in the respective folder for each part, in PNG format. Up to 32 bit PNGs are supported.

Note: In case you are converting an existing boot animation to fit your phone’s screen, simply extract the images from it and resize each of them to your device’s screen resolution.

6. Make sure the images are named in numerical format and in proper sequence, i.e. the images in the first part should start with let’s say 000.png and go on till 075.png, and the images in the second part should then start off with 076.png and go on till – for instance – 123.png.
7. Once you have the images for all the parts done and saved with proper names in each folder, create a text file named desc.txt in the main sanim folder.
8. Open the text file in a text editor and edit it in the format described in detail in the desc.txt file section above. Do consider that a frame rate higher than 30 fps can give issues on many devices.

Note: In case you are converting an existing boot animation to fit your phone’s screen, keep everything the same as in the original desc.txt file and change only the resolution.

9. Now select everything inside the sanim folder and zip them into a new uncompressed zip archive using your favorite compression utility. Here is the method using 7-zip:
9A. Select everything inside the sanim folder.
9B. Right-click on any of the selected files/folders and from the 7-zip menu, select ‘Add to archive’.
9C. Use ‘zip’ as the archive format and ‘store’ as the compression level, and click OK. This will create a file called sanim.zip in the same folder.

DONE with your own bootanimation.

Applying sanim.zip into I9003
Copying the sanim.zip to /system/media/. Make sure you have root access and mount your system to R/W access. This will be done by Root Explorer. After that reboot your I9003

Note: Make sure you have done backup your original sanim.zip to somewhere safe like External Card or PC. This can be done by MOVE the file out from the original place and paste it to your External Card.

The Droids series by Dysgenic





Download (XDA Developer)

Android Particle Ring by Dysgenic (Modified by aph):





Download (XDA Developer)

This article has been modified to fit with I9003 Bootanimation
Original post from www.addictivetips.com

UPDATED (21/10/2011)

Creating a boot animation, start to finish.

The following is a start to finish how to via the method that I create boot animations. I can't take full credit, as I have found bits and pieces here an there. I just put them all together..in one place. This isn't an easy process, and does require quite a bit of time.

Tools you will need
- DVD Videosoft Studio
- Gimp or Paint.net or fotosizer
- Zip file creator like 7zip

So get all the programs dloaded and installed and figure out what you want to use for your animation.

You can use images or a clip of video.

We will begin with a youtube video. Youdoofus has supplied us with an excellent specimen.
YouTube - Doin' Your Mom - with dancing cat

A. Downloading a video (Skip these steps if using some other video. Go to B.)
Open the video studio
Click Youtube
Then Youtube download
Paste the link of the video you want to use
Click download (bottom right)
Close out of the Download screen, un check all of the boxes in the pop-up otherwise the program does install web toolbars.

B. Extracting Images from any video. (Skip to C if you already have images.)
Open the video studio
Click on Photo and Images
Free Video to Jpeg
Browse to you video file
Select the option (I use every frame so I can pic and choose)
Close studio, remember to un check the boxes

C. Convert Images
Create a folder on your desktop and put your images in it.
Use you photo edit tool of choice. I use fotosizer, it allows batch.
Select your size. For the Evo use 480x800
Choose Destination Folder I always create a new folder
Output as .png
Filename mask should be %f (the other options never work for me)
Choose add images
Highlight all of the images
Click Start
Now open the new folder of converted images (you can delete the originals folder from the first step above)
Right click on the first image and select rename
Rename in numerical order 0001 pressing tab after you are done..until you reach the end. I don't use more than 100 images. Small groups like this can be repeated. I only pulled 15 images from the video. We will have it loop in the script below.

D. Building the bootanimaton.zip
Create two folders, named part0 and part1
part0 will contain a single, display once png and part1 would contain the animation images. You can play with different scenarios here...ie loop images until boot is complete or loop once and stop on one last image. I will get more details together soon.
Place animation files in part1 folder and a "frozen image" in part0 if you choose to set it up that way.

We need to tell the animation what to do with this type of txt file
480 800 60
p 0 0 part0
p 0 0 part1

again
The boot animation is stored on your phone as a zip file in the folder /system/media. It consists of 2 folders part0 and part1 and a description text file (desc.txt). Both part0 and part1 folders contain animation frames as PNG files. part0 folder contains those frames which are animated only once, where as part1 folder contains the looped(repeated) frames. The desc.txt file contains the animation settings such as fps (number of frames per second), width, height, times to be played, pause time etc you can change up a lot here.

Ctrl+ select the part0 file the part1 and the desc text file and right click.
Select 7zip or your zip program and then "add to blahblahblah.zip" Make sure to do .zip and not the other choices. Make sure your default settings are for no compression.

Rename the file bootanimation.zip (remember not to name it .zip.zip) I keep a few animations on my sd car in a file called "booty" so I typically put something in front like kitty_bootanimation.zip so i know which is which.

Put the file on your sd card.
Use root explorer to navigate to system.media and rename the current boot animation to whatever you want.
Now copy your new animation from the sd card to system.media

In some cases the animation will be located at system.customize.resource

To add an audio clip use any mp3, renamed android_audio.mp3 and put it in the same place as your animation. Keep in mind audio doesn't work on all roms. You may also need to adjust the length. I use Audacity for that on the pc, and there are a number of ringtone trimmers that will do it on the phone.

ALSO SEE THIS:-

1. How to make your own boot animations (with sound if you want) by despotovski01
2. How to preview your Android boot animations on your computer by despotovski01
3. Boot Animation Creator-Make Android Boot Animations With Ease! by despotovski01
 
Last edited:

HeathenMan

Senior Member
Oct 8, 2011
494
95
doesnt work for me : forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?p=18607910#post18607910
 
Last edited:

adz63

Senior Member
Aug 11, 2010
2,059
629
41
London/Surrey
Thanks im a complete beginner at this but gonna give it a go i will share when completed

Sent from galaxy s2 , somewhere having a beer using xda premium
 

kirankowshik

Senior Member
Jul 29, 2011
710
118
chennai
OnePlus 8T
OnePlus 9R
Droid Bionic Boot Animation

Heyy guys..can anyone pls provide me with droid bionic boot animation for our GT-i9003 device?? I am trying to downscale the original droid bionic boot animation resolution but it's not working..
 

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  • 12
    This thread is about on how to make your own bootanimation for your I9003 Gingerbread.



    BASIC

    Inside the sanim.zip file
    If you extract the contents of the sanim.zip file to your computer, you will see:

    - A desc.txt file
    - A part0 folder (Contains PNG images named in incremental numbers)
    More part1, part2 etc. folders (May or may not be present)

    As you can see, sanim.zip merely contains one text file and one or more folders with PNG images. The animation is played simply by displaying the images in a sequence, and the text file defines how they are to be played. In essence, first the PNG files in the part0 folder are displayed one after the other and afterwards, those in the part1 file – if it exists – are displayed, again one after the other, and so on.

    The folders
    These contain PNG images named in numbers, starting from something like 0000.png or 00001.png and proceeding with increments of 1. There has to be at least one folder, and there is no known upper limit to the number of folders.

    The desc.txt file
    This file defines how the images in the folder(s) are displayed during the boot animation, in the following format:

    Width Height Frame-rate
    p Loop Pause Folder1
    p Loop Pause Folder2

    An example of a desc.txt file is:
    480 800 30
    p 1 0 part0
    p 0 0 part1

    As you can see, in the first line, 480 and 800 define the width and height of the boot animation in pixels for this example. This must be the same as the screen resolution of your device for the boot animation to properly play in full screen. 30 is the frame rate in fps (frames per second) i.e. number of images to display per second. (resolution for I9003 is 480x800)

    The second and third lines have a same format, start with p, which stands for a part of the animation and end in part0 or part1, which denotes the folder in which the images for that part are present.

    The number after ‘p’ defines how many times this part will loop (repeat playback) before switching to the next part (if present). Specifying 0 would make the part loop indefinitely till the phone has fully booted.

    The next number is for the pause, and is expressed in the number of frames, which can be translated into time by dividing it by the frame rate. A pause of 15 for example, would mean pausing for the time it takes 15 frames to play and since the frame rate is 30 frames per second, 15 frames would take half a second.

    Translating all of this in case of the above example, the boot animation will play at a resolution of 480 by 800 pixels, at a frame rate of 30 fps, starting with the contents of part0 folder and after playing them in one loop, switching to contents of part1 folder and playing them continuously till the device fully boots.

    Note: Most high-end Android devices with large screens have a resolution of 480 x 800 pixels, and are referred to as HDPI. Some mid-range devices have a resolution of 320 x 480 pixels and are called MDPI. Lastly, the screen resolution of some low-end devices is 340 x 320 pixels and these are called LDPI.

    Requirements:
    1. A zip/unzip utility like 7-Zip
    2. Image editor of your choice like Photoshop, GIMP, Paint.NET, and also MS Paint.
    3. A plain text editor of your choice. Using Windows Notepad for editing text files that are to be used in Linux is not always a good idea, so use something like Notepad++ instead.
    4. Creativity and Time
    5. I9003 screen resolution is 480x800

    Procedure:
    1. Go through the entire inside the sanim.zip (Description on the top post, if you haven’t already done so)
    2. Plan how your boot animation will run including how many distinct parts it will have, how long will each part play and what will be the sequence of the parts.
    3. Make a new folder at any convenient location on your computer, and name it sanim.
    4. In this folder, create a folder for each part of your boot animation, named part0, part1 and so on.
    5. In the image editor of your choice, make all the image files for each part of your boot animation with the proper which is 480x800 equal to I9003 phone screen resolution, and save them in the respective folder for each part, in PNG format. Up to 32 bit PNGs are supported.

    Note: In case you are converting an existing boot animation to fit your phone’s screen, simply extract the images from it and resize each of them to your device’s screen resolution.

    6. Make sure the images are named in numerical format and in proper sequence, i.e. the images in the first part should start with let’s say 000.png and go on till 075.png, and the images in the second part should then start off with 076.png and go on till – for instance – 123.png.
    7. Once you have the images for all the parts done and saved with proper names in each folder, create a text file named desc.txt in the main sanim folder.
    8. Open the text file in a text editor and edit it in the format described in detail in the desc.txt file section above. Do consider that a frame rate higher than 30 fps can give issues on many devices.

    Note: In case you are converting an existing boot animation to fit your phone’s screen, keep everything the same as in the original desc.txt file and change only the resolution.

    9. Now select everything inside the sanim folder and zip them into a new uncompressed zip archive using your favorite compression utility. Here is the method using 7-zip:
    9A. Select everything inside the sanim folder.
    9B. Right-click on any of the selected files/folders and from the 7-zip menu, select ‘Add to archive’.
    9C. Use ‘zip’ as the archive format and ‘store’ as the compression level, and click OK. This will create a file called sanim.zip in the same folder.

    DONE with your own bootanimation.

    Applying sanim.zip into I9003
    Copying the sanim.zip to /system/media/. Make sure you have root access and mount your system to R/W access. This will be done by Root Explorer. After that reboot your I9003

    Note: Make sure you have done backup your original sanim.zip to somewhere safe like External Card or PC. This can be done by MOVE the file out from the original place and paste it to your External Card.

    The Droids series by Dysgenic





    Download (XDA Developer)

    Android Particle Ring by Dysgenic (Modified by aph):





    Download (XDA Developer)

    This article has been modified to fit with I9003 Bootanimation
    Original post from www.addictivetips.com

    UPDATED (21/10/2011)

    Creating a boot animation, start to finish.

    The following is a start to finish how to via the method that I create boot animations. I can't take full credit, as I have found bits and pieces here an there. I just put them all together..in one place. This isn't an easy process, and does require quite a bit of time.

    Tools you will need
    - DVD Videosoft Studio
    - Gimp or Paint.net or fotosizer
    - Zip file creator like 7zip

    So get all the programs dloaded and installed and figure out what you want to use for your animation.

    You can use images or a clip of video.

    We will begin with a youtube video. Youdoofus has supplied us with an excellent specimen.
    YouTube - Doin' Your Mom - with dancing cat

    A. Downloading a video (Skip these steps if using some other video. Go to B.)
    Open the video studio
    Click Youtube
    Then Youtube download
    Paste the link of the video you want to use
    Click download (bottom right)
    Close out of the Download screen, un check all of the boxes in the pop-up otherwise the program does install web toolbars.

    B. Extracting Images from any video. (Skip to C if you already have images.)
    Open the video studio
    Click on Photo and Images
    Free Video to Jpeg
    Browse to you video file
    Select the option (I use every frame so I can pic and choose)
    Close studio, remember to un check the boxes

    C. Convert Images
    Create a folder on your desktop and put your images in it.
    Use you photo edit tool of choice. I use fotosizer, it allows batch.
    Select your size. For the Evo use 480x800
    Choose Destination Folder I always create a new folder
    Output as .png
    Filename mask should be %f (the other options never work for me)
    Choose add images
    Highlight all of the images
    Click Start
    Now open the new folder of converted images (you can delete the originals folder from the first step above)
    Right click on the first image and select rename
    Rename in numerical order 0001 pressing tab after you are done..until you reach the end. I don't use more than 100 images. Small groups like this can be repeated. I only pulled 15 images from the video. We will have it loop in the script below.

    D. Building the bootanimaton.zip
    Create two folders, named part0 and part1
    part0 will contain a single, display once png and part1 would contain the animation images. You can play with different scenarios here...ie loop images until boot is complete or loop once and stop on one last image. I will get more details together soon.
    Place animation files in part1 folder and a "frozen image" in part0 if you choose to set it up that way.

    We need to tell the animation what to do with this type of txt file
    480 800 60
    p 0 0 part0
    p 0 0 part1

    again
    The boot animation is stored on your phone as a zip file in the folder /system/media. It consists of 2 folders part0 and part1 and a description text file (desc.txt). Both part0 and part1 folders contain animation frames as PNG files. part0 folder contains those frames which are animated only once, where as part1 folder contains the looped(repeated) frames. The desc.txt file contains the animation settings such as fps (number of frames per second), width, height, times to be played, pause time etc you can change up a lot here.

    Ctrl+ select the part0 file the part1 and the desc text file and right click.
    Select 7zip or your zip program and then "add to blahblahblah.zip" Make sure to do .zip and not the other choices. Make sure your default settings are for no compression.

    Rename the file bootanimation.zip (remember not to name it .zip.zip) I keep a few animations on my sd car in a file called "booty" so I typically put something in front like kitty_bootanimation.zip so i know which is which.

    Put the file on your sd card.
    Use root explorer to navigate to system.media and rename the current boot animation to whatever you want.
    Now copy your new animation from the sd card to system.media

    In some cases the animation will be located at system.customize.resource

    To add an audio clip use any mp3, renamed android_audio.mp3 and put it in the same place as your animation. Keep in mind audio doesn't work on all roms. You may also need to adjust the length. I use Audacity for that on the pc, and there are a number of ringtone trimmers that will do it on the phone.

    ALSO SEE THIS:-

    1. How to make your own boot animations (with sound if you want) by despotovski01
    2. How to preview your Android boot animations on your computer by despotovski01
    3. Boot Animation Creator-Make Android Boot Animations With Ease! by despotovski01
    1
    Nice Explanation bro..You might check my attched file and Maybe It will fit on your thread...\m/