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Install CyanogenMod 12.1 on Barnes & Noble Nook HD or Nook HD+ in Five Easy Steps

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PeteInSequim

Senior Member
Jul 12, 2015
58
69
Sequim, Washington
I'm trying to load CWM . . .
And if you have suggestions for alternate procedures or ROMs, I'd be eager to hear it.

DrWu, my best guess is that the microSD card is not actually bootable. It can be tricky to arrange this, especially on a Windows system.
You would be far better off now to install a LineageOS version of Nougat built specifically for the Nook HD (Hummingbird). I have not written any instructions for this but I assure you it is far easier than things were back in Lollipop days. It is especially easy if you happen to have a Linux desktop computer to build the microSD card. It can also be done under Windows, but I don't know the details for this.

You will need some files.
Go to https://notredame.app.box.com/s/26a4bygh9vbaw7jjq08xr5evomvaw5ww/folder/3332708110 and download three files, complements of Andrei Măceș:
lnos-hummingbird-otaNJH4.170813.zip
sdcard-reco-hummingbird.img.xz
twrp-3.0.1-0-hummingbird.zip

Next get the latest gapps for ARM platform, Android 7.1, pico variant. While there also click the red MD5 CHECKSUM link to get the check file.

The procedure is as follows:
1. Build the microSD card using the sdcard-reco-hummingbird.img.xz file. If using a Linux computer, such as Ubuntu, simply opening this compressed image file will bring up a utility to build the bootable card with a recovery image ready to use.

2. Then copy the remaining files (lnos, twrp, and the two files from OpenGapps .org onto the card.

That's it. Boot from the card into the TWRP recovery utility, wipe the tablet, install the zip files, and hope it goes better than before. Be aware that this unofficial version of LineageOS does have a few issues, but its the best available for the old Nooks.

Feel free to PM me if you have difficulty.

Pete
 
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...
On to the details. I'm using an 8gb Class 4 PNY card, which I prepped both under Linux (GParted) and with Windows (MiniTool Partition Wizard) as per PeteInSequim's PDF guide. I tried booting 10+ times with the Linux-prepared card and at least 10 more with the Windows-prepped card and in no case did it appear to make any effort to boot from the card.

...
And that's it. Insert card, power on, and ... nothing.

Now to my questions.
Firstly, is there any way I can know whether the tablet's failure to boot is the fault of the device or the fault of an improperly constructed/configured SD card? Or is either simply the more likely?

Is there anything I can do differently in the preparation of the SD card that might improve my results? (I also have other larger and 'faster' SD cards I might use)
...
See the notes at the bottom of this post https://forum.xda-developers.com/showpost.php?p=51043572&postcount=1 for potential causes of SD-boot failures.

You should also try a different card, it needs not be faster (class 4 would be just fine) nor larger (8GB is quite adequate even if you plan to backup your current/future ROM's /system & /data onto SD card).

If you want to try out the newer ROM LN14.1 in lieu of CM11, this process outlined at https://forum.xda-developers.com/nook-hd/general/how-to-installing-ln14-1-internally-hd-t3562810 for the HD+ should be adaptable for the HD by swapping in the corresponding TWRP and ROM builds for the HD.
 
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DrWu

Senior Member
Feb 10, 2015
106
3
Brilliant. I only had aspirations to CM but now I'm running LineageOS 14.1 and I are happy camper.

Do you know the difference between a fairy tale and a war story?
Fairy tales always begin with, "Once upon a time ... "
... but war stories always start with, "Now you ain't gonna believe this bull shizzle ... "

Well you ain't gonna believe this but I made my post yesterday afternoon, then stepped out for two hours of outpatient orthopedic surgery. When I came home and found your two replies waiting, I was so jazzed that I fell in on it straightway and did the installs. Then I worked until the wee hours of the morning (getting started on) installing all my pet Android tweaks and apps before I put Dr. Feelgood in the driver's seat. If that doesn't define "geek," I don't know what does.

The files and procedures (updated from the OP) worked flawlessly. My initial booting problem appears to have been the SD card itself. I flashed sdcard-reco-hummingbird.img.xz using Mint's default Disk Image Writer app, then copied the remaining files and tried to boot from it but it was a no-go. So I ditched the 8gb PNY and went to a 4gb Sandisk and, bada-bing, Success!

So I am thankful there are fellow hobbyists like so many here who are so invested in this "movement" yet still willing to share the fruits of their hard work. And thanks to you guys for your willingness to "dumb it down" so even a noob could understand it.
 
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wayover13

Member
Oct 1, 2015
14
0
I used the instructions from the OP a couple years ago to install CWM and TWRP to a couple of Nook HD+es that I have and all went well. I've been using these units regularly in the interim with pretty good results. Now, however, I've encountered a problem with one of the units. After a recent recharging session, the unit has become stuck in some sort of boot loop. The boot process gets as far as the little Android head appearing on-screen with the expanding circle in the background, but will go no further. Additionally, the corner of the device that has the hole in it warms up considerably while the unit sits in that state. I can get into TWRP recovery by rebooting and holding down the requisite buttons, but have so far not discovered any way in doing that to effect some repair.

What I'm wondering, after reading new contributions to this thread, is whether I might be able to remedy the issue I'm experiencing by just installing the newer Marshmallow (Nougat?) version recently referenced? Any input here on whether I might be able to remedy the issue that has cropped up by effectively reinstalling a newer Android ROM to my device? Input will be appreciated.
 
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PeteInSequim

Senior Member
Jul 12, 2015
58
69
Sequim, Washington
I haven't seen your specific issue, but I have seen two examples of these Nooks entering a "Trebuchet has stopped working" loop. No observations about warm areas though.

Both of these situations were fixed by re-rom'ing with the Nougat release mentioned in post #221 earlier in this thread. You will probably have to use the pico variant of Open Gapps to squeeze everything in. In fact I always include with the gapps file a gapps-config file containing the entries shown below, just to save a little more space.

ExchangeGoogle
FaceDetect
FaceUnlock
BasicDreams
Browser
Email
NoiseField
Phasebeam
PhotoPhase
PhotoTable
GoogleTTS
 

wayover13

Member
Oct 1, 2015
14
0
Thanks for your quick reply, PeteInSequim. Assuming something isn't seriously borked with my hardware, I'd actually been hoping I might be able to further update these Nook HD+es--even though the re-rom'ing (new verb, eh?) would likely hose the settings and data on the unit that's now giving me problems. I would guess that, given that I can get into TWRP recovery, chanced are good that re-rom'ing would succeed--wouldn't you think?

I was looking over post 221 as I wrote my entry earlier today, guessing that it could apply here. You mention there hummingbird but, if memory serves, I would need the ovation files for the HD+, correct? I do run Linux, though not Ubuntu (I'm using Arch/Void/Gentoo these days), so running a utility such as the one mentioned may well work for my scenario. Not quite sure I understand how the referenced sdcard-reco-*.img.xz part of the equation works: does that give you a loop-mounted application, complete with necessary libs, ala the TinyCore method of adding utilities to a running Linux file system? Further input will be appreciated.
 

PeteInSequim

Senior Member
Jul 12, 2015
58
69
Sequim, Washington
You would need Ovation files, which are available here. Select the Ovation folder and download the .xz file, and the .zip files for lnos and TWRP. You'll also need the latest ARM 7.1 pico file from opengapps.org and I recommend also the md5 checksum file.

You absolutely must wipe the old installation before re-rom'ing (I just though of this word this morning, so not official). So back up anything you want to keep. The new TWRP utility that you will boot to using the new microSD card can manage this for you. In fact I think it can even support OTG if you have a proper transition cable, but I've not actually tried this.

I'd make a very small wager that the new ROM installation will be free of the problem you describe, but no promises.

The referenced file whose name ends in .xz is a compressed image that is conveniently expanded into about 1 gB of image on a bootable microSD card by the Linux utility I mentioned. Windows users must first extract the image, then go through additional procedures to install it onto the card. After installation the card contains all the files needed to make it bootable, and an image of TWRP. And there's plenty of room to add the zip files for Nougat, gapps, and TWRP plus if you wish an MD5 checksum file for gapps and a gapps-config file. Just copy them over, or drag and drop them if you have a GUI.

So when you boot into TWRP from the fully-prepared microSD card everything needed will be on hand and ready to flash. Neat huh?
 

wayover13

Member
Oct 1, 2015
14
0
The referenced file whose name ends in .xz is a compressed image that is conveniently expanded into about 1 gB of image on a bootable microSD card by the Linux utility I mentioned. Windows users must first extract the image, then go through additional procedures to install it onto the card. After installation the card contains all the files needed to make it bootable, and an image of TWRP. And there's plenty of room to add the zip files for Nougat, gapps, and TWRP plus if you wish an MD5 checksum file for gapps and a gapps-config file. Just copy them over, or drag and drop them if you have a GUI.
I'm still a bit confused about the nature of the file you describe. I've dealt with plenty of .img files in my day, both compressed and not. But from your description it seems to me there must be some additional binary (or utility, as you've called it) included alongside the .img file that then helps you write the image to the card. Have I understood correctly? I guess I'll just have to download it and see how it works, whether associated libs the utility may need are present on my system, and what sorts of permissions issues there might be, if any.
when you boot into TWRP from the fully-prepared microSD card everything needed will be on hand and ready to flash. Neat huh?
Sounds interesting and a lot simpler than the initial installation of CM. I'll report back once I've tried it.
 
I'm still a bit confused about the nature of the file you describe. I've dealt with plenty of .img files in my day, both compressed and not. But from your description it seems to me there must be some additional binary (or utility, as you've called it) included alongside the .img file that then helps you write the image to the card. Have I understood correctly? I guess I'll just have to download it and see how it works, whether associated libs the utility may need are present on my system, and what sorts of permissions issues there might be, if any.
You can use a disk-image writer program such as win32diskimager to write the sdcard-reco-ovation.img file to the sdcard -- see https://forum.xda-developers.com/nook-hd/general/how-to-installing-ln14-1-internally-hd-t3562810.

Alternatively, you can unpack the sdcard-reco-ovation.img file using an archive program and copy its content to the bootable partition of the sdcard -- see the steps #1-3 of https://forum.xda-developers.com/showpost.php?p=51043572&postcount=1 (just swap in the sdcard-reco-ovation.img file in place of the verygreen img file). This alternative method is a bit more tedious but enables you to size the sdcard boot partition to be as big as 16GB which can be handy for backing up your Nook's current ROM and Apps onto sdcard.
 

wayover13

Member
Oct 1, 2015
14
0
Thanks for the additional input. I know all about tar and have used it to create archives and compress/uncompress files/folders for years. I've also dealt with uncompressing .xz files on many occasions. It just seemed to me something more than that was being talked about. Earlier, for example, it was said that "simply opening this compressed image file will bring up a utility to build the bootable card with a recovery image ready to use." Well, I have midnight commander configured to uncompress .xz files when, on highlighting such a file, I hit the "enter" key; nothing more than a display in the terminal of the uncompressed image file's file name is to be seen when I execute those steps on this file. Likewise if I double click on the .xz file in a graphical file manager: that opens a file extraction utility that would allow me to save the uncompressed file somewhere. So, when dealing with this .xz file thus far I'm not seeing anything I could characterize as "a utility to build the bootable card with a recovery image ready to use."

I understand digixmax's description about extracting an image and writing it to a device--something I've also done countless times. Being a Linux user I typically use dd for such tasks. It sounds like the further description about copying content is a good deal like something else I've done numerous times over the years, namely loop-mounting an image file (whether .img or .iso) in order to examine and/or copy its contents elsewhere. Does it seem I am understanding correctly about that?

As the case may be, I'll have to do some more research. The process being described seems to bear a good deal of resemblance to processes I've accomplished many times over the years I've been using Linux and fiddling with tech. But it looks like I'll have to do a bit of translation to transform it into terms and concepts more familiar to me. I was apparently in error in gathering that an automated or semi-automated process for creating the SD card was being described. Of course it would be convenient if that were the case, but I should be perfectly capable of performing this task in a more hands-on fashion as well.
 
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wayover13

Member
Oct 1, 2015
14
0
I managed to fix my Nook HD+, which had gotten itself stuck in some sort of boot loop, by installing LineageOS as discussed in more recent posts in this thread. I had to sort of cobble together, from a couple of threads (including this one), the steps I would need to take in order to execute the process successfully. A bit of translation of concepts was needed since most directives for doing this sort of task are geared toward Windows users, whereas I am a GNU/Linux user. I ran into an undocumented glitch toward the end, but that was easily surmounted. I will now list the steps I took to accomplish the task.

To begin with, I more or less skipped an essential first step since I had an SD card laying around that I'd previously used for installing CWM on my Nook. Had I been starting from scratch, I assume I'd at least had to have set the SD card's partition to be bootable, which I almost surely would have done using the cfdisk program. Some directives have you create a FAT32 filesystem on the SD card but, so far as I'm aware, these cards already come with a FAT32 filesystem on them. As the case may be, my card already had the needed filesystem and the boot flag was already toggled for its only partition.

Next, I downloaded files I would put on the SD card. The names of those files were sdcard-reco-ovation.img.xz, lnos_ovation-ota-NJH47F.171021.zip, twrp-3.0.1-0-ovation.zip, and open_gapps-arm-7.1-pico-20171228.zip and they were found at the link provided earlier in this thread by PeteInSequim and by digixmax in the thread over at https://forum.xda-developers.com/nook-hd/general/how-to-installing-ln14-1-internally-hd-t3562810.

In order to put needed files from sdcard-reco-ovation.img.xz onto the SD card, I first had to uncompress the archive, which I did by running tar xf sdcard-reco-ovation.img.xz. That left me with the uncompressed image file sdcard-reco-ovation.img.

To mount that file as a looped filesystem from which I could copy contents to some other location, I had to first determine the offset of the filesystem contained in the image. The command sudo fdisk -l /path/to/sdcard-reco-ovation.img gave me necessary information for doing that: it showed sectors in the image's filesystem were 512 bytes, and that the start point of the image's filesystem was 59. Thus, I used the command sudo mount -t auto -o loop,offset=$((59*512)) /path/to/sdcard-reco-ovation.img /mnt/loop in order to mount it.

At that point, having already mounted the SD card, I was able to copy over from the loop-mounted image, needed files to the SD card. I followed directives digixmax inidicated that he'd given in steps 1-3 at https://forum.xda-developers.com/showpost.php?p=51043572&postcount=1.

Once I'd copied those over from the loop-mounted image file to the SD, I proceeded to copy over to it the other files digixmax lists at https://forum.xda-developers.com/nook-hd/general/how-to-installing-ln14-1-internally-hd-t3562810. I then followed his further directives in that post, found in steps 3-9, in order to initiate the LineageOS installation.

The glitch I experienced was that, on rebooting the device at step 9, it seemed to get stuck at the Nook boot screen and would not proceed further. I decided I should manually power off the device and reboot to see what would happen. Once I'd done that, the Nook boot screen soon gave way to the Cyanoboot screen and the device booted up as expected. The little bit of testing I've done seems to indicate that the device is back to good health.

I have a couple of questions about restoring from back-up that I'll ask about in a subsequent entry in this thread. Thanks for the helpful tips provided here by PeteInSequim and digixmax and for their assistance in aiding us in keeping our Nooks useful beyond their intended lifespan.
 
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wayover13

Member
Oct 1, 2015
14
0
I guess my remaining query about doing this upgrade has been addressed, at least in part, through a bit of experimentation. I was under the impression that, in order to restore data that got wiped when I installed LineageOS, I'd have to run some sort of restore routine. Perhaps by booting into TWRP, or perhaps through the installed Android OS. But on rummaging through my new installation last night, I discovered that all of the data I had in the internal memory of my Nook was still present. I am deducing from this that, when I backed up the device before wiping it and installing LineageOS, some sort of back-up file was created, one that would be auto-detected by a new Android install and that would be automatically restored as part of the installation process. Am I correct in inferring that this is how the process works? It would be nice to get confirmation on that before upgrading my other Nook: the one I upgraded yesterday has a cracked screen and I use it for testing, but the one I'm really interested in upgrading is the mission-critical one whose data I would not want to lose. Further input on this aspect of the upgrade process will be appreciated.
 
I guess my remaining query about doing this upgrade has been addressed, at least in part, through a bit of experimentation. I was under the impression that, in order to restore data that got wiped when I installed LineageOS, I'd have to run some sort of restore routine. Perhaps by booting into TWRP, or perhaps through the installed Android OS. But on rummaging through my new installation last night, I discovered that all of the data I had in the internal memory of my Nook was still present. I am deducing from this that, when I backed up the device before wiping it and installing LineageOS, some sort of back-up file was created, one that would be auto-detected by a new Android install and that would be automatically restored as part of the installation process. Am I correct in inferring that this is how the process works? It would be nice to get confirmation on that before upgrading my other Nook: the one I upgraded yesterday has a cracked screen and I use it for testing, but the one I'm really interested in upgrading is the mission-critical one whose data I would not want to lose. Further input on this aspect of the upgrade process will be appreciated.
Custom recoveries such as TWRP and CWM support backup and restore functions to back up and restore (by default) the content of the 3 partitions:

- /boot partition: boot.img file
- /system partition: the Android OS and basic apps that come by default with a ROM
- /data partition: user-installed apps (from GApps package or App stores)

Both backup and restore functions need to be explicitly invoked through the recovery's backup/restore menu options. You can create multiple backup versions (dated & time-stamped archive files), and later select a particular backup version to restore from.

Flashing a new ROM build would replace the content of /boot and /system partitions, whereas flashing a new GApps package version (typically should be preceded by a "wipe /data" operation) would replace the content of /data partition.

The user-media content (ebooks, photos, music, video, etc.) is stored in the /user-media partition which should not be affected by the ROM and GApps flashing operations of most recent and current custom recoveries (I seem to recall that some really old versions of custom recoveries as well as the stock recovery's "factory reset" option does wipe out the content of the /user-media partition).
 
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wayover13

Member
Oct 1, 2015
14
0
Thanks for that helpful explanation, digixmax. So I guess the restore function being described is meant to work kind of like Mac's time machine or the Windows equivalent? You set up your tablet and get it working in a way you consider optimal, then do a back-up? And, if something later borks things up you can go into TWRP and restore the system to that previous point?

So it sounds like the internal memory must be divided into a few partitions, yes? And the /user-media partition doesn't get touched during a reflash? That's the way I can think of that would allow for preserving that data; putting the /home directory on a separate partition is how some Linux users preserve important stuff they want to persist across OS reinstallations.

On the more important Nook I now want to upgrade, I believe I've put most of the important data on the external SD card; I'll need to remove that card anyway in order to insert another from which I can reflash it with LineageOS. So maybe I'm not risking much there anyway.

Does anyone have any idea for how much longer new releases of LineageOS will be developed for these Nook devices? I suppose it's up to the good will of amaces, who has been rendering this wonderful service to us Nook users thus far?
 
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...
You set up your tablet and get it working in a way you consider optimal, then do a back-up? And, if something later borks things up you can go into TWRP and restore the system to that previous point?
Yes.
So it sounds like the internal memory must be divided into a few partitions, yes? And the /user-media partition doesn't get touched during a reflash? That's the way I can think of that would allow for preserving that data; putting the /home directory on a separate partition is how some Linux users preserve important stuff they want to persist across OS reinstallations.
Below is the storage partition structure of the Nook HD+ 16GB model:

xloader 128K /dev/block/mmcblk0p1
bootloader 256K /dev/block/mmcblk0p2
recovery 15M /dev/block/mmcblk0p3
boot 16M /dev/block/mmcblk0p4
rom 49M /dev/block/mmcblk0p5
bootdata 49M /dev/block/mmcblk0p6
factory 459M /dev/block/mmcblk0p7
system 688M /dev/block/mmcblk0p8
cache 475M /dev/block/mmcblk0p9
userdata 13G /dev/block/mmcblk0p10

The logical separation of the user media-content from the "/data content" within the /userdata partition is explained in item #9 of leapinlar's post https://forum.xda-developers.com/showpost.php?p=34168454&postcount=1.

Does anyone have any idea for how much longer new releases of LineageOS will be developed for these Nook devices? I suppose it's up to the good will of amaces, who has been rendering this wonderful service to us Nook users thus far?
In my experience, a newer version of OS or app can be a mixed blessing: more feature enhancements but often at the expense of more taxing consumption of the tablet's CPU and RAM.
 
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Aug 21, 2014
16
0
Going back to stock with TWRP.

Development for unofficial CM-12.1 for Nook HD and Nook HD+ has ceased.
The author @amaces has moved on to Marshmallow (Android 6), and the zip files for these progressive releases are what you now see at the collaboration link. If you wish to install CM-12.1 look instead through the pages of his "obsolete" folder for "cm-12.1-20151018" and "twrp-2.8.7.4" final releases. CWM should install these properly but later versions are likely to fail due to deficiencies in the CWM recovery utility.

Better yet try the latest Marshmallow and TWRP versions. For this you must create a new bootable microSD card using these files provided by @belfastraven and the downloaded zip files "cm_hummingbird-ota-MHC19Q.160407.zip" and "twrp-3.0.1-0-hummingbird.zip". These versions may advance by the time you happen to do this. The procedure is the same as described in the .pdf guide for CM-12.1, except with the new files.

And use a current GApps file for the ARM platform, Android 6.0 from http://opengapps.org/.



This is a detailed tutorial for beginners. Seasoned users may find it overly verbose.

My toy box contains some Nook HD and Nook HD+ tablets, and I recently became aware of CyanogenMod. I studied about it for a while and finally tried a CM-12.1 installation. It was successful, and I was so impressed by the improvements that I told some Nook-owning friends about it. They quickly decided to do likewise and asked for instructions.

My friends and I are all retirees, so we have seven Saturdays a week to spend as we wish. I decided to spend a few of mine re-writing my notes into an instruction manual. As of today, September 25, 2015, there are eleven formerly stock Nook tablets whose beginner-owners have followed the instruction and successfully installed CM-12.1. Several of these are being regularly updated as revisions are released. No bricks have been cast so far.

During the study period I spent a lot of time on xda developers pages, and it eventually occurred to me that there might be other beginners who could make good use of Nook-specific instructions. So I am pleased to offer this manual to anyone interested, and hope it will save you some time and trouble.

The procedure uses the technique and boot files by @leapinlar. The ROM and TWRP zip files used are those created by @amaces. Profound thanks to these experts for their diligent work and generosity.

Below is a synopsis of the instructions. The complete PDF document is attached to this post.

This document will guide you through the steps of installing a pure modern version of the Android operating system on your Nook HD or Nook HD+ tablet. The installation is done from a bootable microSD card using the ClockWorkMod recovery utility to install the contents of zip files. This straightforward method does not require ADB or rooting the Nook. The result is CM-12.1 installed with basic Google apps and your choice of TWRP or CWM for your resident recovery utility.

There's room for improvement.
If I could learn how to create a bootable microSD that would boot to TWRP instead of CWM the procedure could be reduced to four easy steps. I have found no help for this, and my own attempts have all failed. I would be most grateful for any help so I can update the instructions.

What is the procedure for going back to stock when using TWRP? Leapenlar explains it with CWM here: https://forum.xda-developers.com/showpost.php?p=42406126 but at the begining of your very helpful PDF you mention that installing the backup program enables going back to stock.

Would you happen to know where to find a .rar file for TWRP 3.1.1 for humminbird and ovation?

I'm trying something somewhat experimental with my nook hd. I'm hoping to actually get Nougat on it by using TWRP (which, worst case cenario I can upgrade once I flash the earlier version) since CWM is phasing out. But use a more updated gapps and the Nougat file https://www.dropbox.com/sh/cek7xg5c...8Sa/cm_hummingbird-ota-NMF26Q.161222.zip?dl=0 from Mr.LarryQ on Wordpress here: https://nookhdplusandroid7.wordpress.com/2017/02/26/installing-android-7-on-a-nook-hd-for-free/
 

PeteInSequim

Senior Member
Jul 12, 2015
58
69
Sequim, Washington
Would you happen to know where to find a .rar file for TWRP 3.1.1 for humminbird and ovation?

I'm trying something somewhat experimental with my nook hd. I'm hoping to actually get Nougat on it by using TWRP (which, worst case cenario I can upgrade once I flash the earlier version) since CWM is phasing out. But use a more updated gapps and the Nougat file https://www.dropbox.com/sh/cek7xg5c...8Sa/cm_hummingbird-ota-NMF26Q.161222.zip?dl=0 from Mr.LarryQ on Wordpress here: https://nookhdplusandroid7.wordpress.com/2017/02/26/installing-android-7-on-a-nook-hd-for-free/

I'm not sure I understand your question, but it sounds like you want to install Nougat the hard way; by starting from Stock.

I can't help you with this, but please be aware that installing Nougat as provided by @amaces has never been easier. Following are the steps:

1. Download these files for Nook HD+ (Ovation)
from this page:
sdcard-reco-ovation.img.xz, lnos_ovation-ota-NJH47F.171021.zip, twrp-3.0.1-0-ovation.zip

Or these files for Nook HD (Hummingbird)
from this page:
sdcard-reco-hummingbird.img.xz, lnos_hummingbird-ota-NJH47F.171021.zip, twrp-3.0.1-0-hummingbird.zip

2. Download the current ARM 7.1 pico file and its MD5 checksum from opengaps.org. Since we're cramming a lot into limited storage, you might want to prepare a gapps-config file to include with your installation.

3. Use the - - - .img.xz file to build a bootable microSD card, using a card at least 1 gB capacity (I prefer 8 gB). This file is a compressed image that when decompressed and written onto the microSD card will make it bootable to TWRP. If you use a Linux desktop computer for this, use the archive manager to do the whole job with one click. If you are Windows-oriented you will have to first decompress it, then install the decompressed image onto the card. Sorry, I've never done this and can't provide instructions.

4. When the bootable microSD card is ready, drag and drop or otherwise copy the Inos, TWRP, and gapps zip files, the gapps MD5 file, and the gapps-config file onto it.

5. Eject the microSD card, mount it in your Nook, and power up. It will boot to TWRP. Follow the usual wipe and install procedure for zip files from the microSD card. The preferred order is Inos ---, TWRP---, and gapps---.

6. Post a reply to this post to let us all know how it worked for you.
 
Aug 21, 2014
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I'm not sure I understand your question, but it sounds like you want to install Nougat the hard way; by starting from Stock.

I can't help you with this, but please be aware that installing Nougat as provided by @amaces has never been easier...

Thanks for your response. Sorry for my ignorance. These files will be very helpful, but if my nook is at stock now? I thought I needed the full .rar file to root from stock. I suppose I can root CM 12.1 the use amaces files on that. I thought I was taking a short cut. I guess not.

I can burn the .img file to the SD card using the method you've explained. But can I still return to stock? My main concern is that I want to make sure I have the ability to do so.
 
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    Want to try Nougat on your Nook HD+ or HD?
    Installing Nougat has never been easier. Procedure described in post 239 of this thread.

    Development for unofficial CM-12.1 for Nook HD and Nook HD+ has ceased.
    The author @amaces has moved on to Marshmallow (Android 6), and the zip files for these progressive releases are what you now see at the collaboration link. If you wish to install CM-12.1 look instead through the pages of his "obsolete" folder for "cm-12.1-20151018" and "twrp-2.8.7.4" final releases. CWM should install these properly but later versions are likely to fail due to deficiencies in the CWM recovery utility.

    Better yet try the latest Marshmallow and TWRP versions. For this you must create a new bootable microSD card using these files provided by @belfastraven and the downloaded zip files "cm_hummingbird-ota-MHC19Q.160407.zip" and "twrp-3.0.1-0-hummingbird.zip". These versions may advance by the time you happen to do this. The procedure is the same as described in the .pdf guide for CM-12.1, except with the new files.

    And use a current GApps file for the ARM platform, Android 6.0 from http://opengapps.org/.



    This is a detailed tutorial for beginners. Seasoned users may find it overly verbose.

    My toy box contains some Nook HD and Nook HD+ tablets, and I recently became aware of CyanogenMod. I studied about it for a while and finally tried a CM-12.1 installation. It was successful, and I was so impressed by the improvements that I told some Nook-owning friends about it. They quickly decided to do likewise and asked for instructions.

    My friends and I are all retirees, so we have seven Saturdays a week to spend as we wish. I decided to spend a few of mine re-writing my notes into an instruction manual. As of today, September 25, 2015, there are eleven formerly stock Nook tablets whose beginner-owners have followed the instruction and successfully installed CM-12.1. Several of these are being regularly updated as revisions are released. No bricks have been cast so far.

    During the study period I spent a lot of time on xda developers pages, and it eventually occurred to me that there might be other beginners who could make good use of Nook-specific instructions. So I am pleased to offer this manual to anyone interested, and hope it will save you some time and trouble.

    The procedure uses the technique and boot files by @leapinlar. The ROM and TWRP zip files used are those created by @amaces. Profound thanks to these experts for their diligent work and generosity.

    Below is a synopsis of the instructions. The complete PDF document is attached to this post.

    This document will guide you through the steps of installing a pure modern version of the Android operating system on your Nook HD or Nook HD+ tablet. The installation is done from a bootable microSD card using the ClockWorkMod recovery utility to install the contents of zip files. This straightforward method does not require ADB or rooting the Nook. The result is CM-12.1 installed with basic Google apps and your choice of TWRP or CWM for your resident recovery utility.

    There's room for improvement.
    If I could learn how to create a bootable microSD that would boot to TWRP instead of CWM the procedure could be reduced to four easy steps. I have found no help for this, and my own attempts have all failed. I would be most grateful for any help so I can update the instructions.
    2
    I was able to root the stock to Android 7. But now I want to make sure I can go back. I now have Android 7 on there. But, I would like to be able to just take the SD card out and there the stock is.
    ...
    Properly ejected from my laptop, I put the SD card into my powered down Nook HD and fire her up. I backed up and restored the system to the external_sd. Did a factory wipe and reset, then I flashed my zips. Yadda yadda, and I now have Android 7.1.1. Otherwise classic old school procedure, but no stock... :\ Any tips on what I might do to do what you did to get stock to stay?
    To accomplish what you want requires a ROM build that was compiled to run off an SD card. The most recent version of Android OS for which there were such SD-based builds was v4.4.x (KitKat) dated circa 2013/2014 -- see https://forum.xda-developers.com/showthread.php?t=2583952 or https://iamafanof.wordpress.com/2013/12/20/cm11-0-kitkat-android-4-4-2-for-nook-hd-xx-20dec2013/.
    2
    Would you happen to know where to find a .rar file for TWRP 3.1.1 for humminbird and ovation?

    I'm trying something somewhat experimental with my nook hd. I'm hoping to actually get Nougat on it by using TWRP (which, worst case cenario I can upgrade once I flash the earlier version) since CWM is phasing out. But use a more updated gapps and the Nougat file https://www.dropbox.com/sh/cek7xg5c...8Sa/cm_hummingbird-ota-NMF26Q.161222.zip?dl=0 from Mr.LarryQ on Wordpress here: https://nookhdplusandroid7.wordpress.com/2017/02/26/installing-android-7-on-a-nook-hd-for-free/

    I'm not sure I understand your question, but it sounds like you want to install Nougat the hard way; by starting from Stock.

    I can't help you with this, but please be aware that installing Nougat as provided by @amaces has never been easier. Following are the steps:

    1. Download these files for Nook HD+ (Ovation)
    from this page:
    sdcard-reco-ovation.img.xz, lnos_ovation-ota-NJH47F.171021.zip, twrp-3.0.1-0-ovation.zip

    Or these files for Nook HD (Hummingbird)
    from this page:
    sdcard-reco-hummingbird.img.xz, lnos_hummingbird-ota-NJH47F.171021.zip, twrp-3.0.1-0-hummingbird.zip

    2. Download the current ARM 7.1 pico file and its MD5 checksum from opengaps.org. Since we're cramming a lot into limited storage, you might want to prepare a gapps-config file to include with your installation.

    3. Use the - - - .img.xz file to build a bootable microSD card, using a card at least 1 gB capacity (I prefer 8 gB). This file is a compressed image that when decompressed and written onto the microSD card will make it bootable to TWRP. If you use a Linux desktop computer for this, use the archive manager to do the whole job with one click. If you are Windows-oriented you will have to first decompress it, then install the decompressed image onto the card. Sorry, I've never done this and can't provide instructions.

    4. When the bootable microSD card is ready, drag and drop or otherwise copy the Inos, TWRP, and gapps zip files, the gapps MD5 file, and the gapps-config file onto it.

    5. Eject the microSD card, mount it in your Nook, and power up. It will boot to TWRP. Follow the usual wipe and install procedure for zip files from the microSD card. The preferred order is Inos ---, TWRP---, and gapps---.

    6. Post a reply to this post to let us all know how it worked for you.
    2
    I'm trying to load CWM . . .
    And if you have suggestions for alternate procedures or ROMs, I'd be eager to hear it.

    DrWu, my best guess is that the microSD card is not actually bootable. It can be tricky to arrange this, especially on a Windows system.
    You would be far better off now to install a LineageOS version of Nougat built specifically for the Nook HD (Hummingbird). I have not written any instructions for this but I assure you it is far easier than things were back in Lollipop days. It is especially easy if you happen to have a Linux desktop computer to build the microSD card. It can also be done under Windows, but I don't know the details for this.

    You will need some files.
    Go to https://notredame.app.box.com/s/26a4bygh9vbaw7jjq08xr5evomvaw5ww/folder/3332708110 and download three files, complements of Andrei Măceș:
    lnos-hummingbird-otaNJH4.170813.zip
    sdcard-reco-hummingbird.img.xz
    twrp-3.0.1-0-hummingbird.zip

    Next get the latest gapps for ARM platform, Android 7.1, pico variant. While there also click the red MD5 CHECKSUM link to get the check file.

    The procedure is as follows:
    1. Build the microSD card using the sdcard-reco-hummingbird.img.xz file. If using a Linux computer, such as Ubuntu, simply opening this compressed image file will bring up a utility to build the bootable card with a recovery image ready to use.

    2. Then copy the remaining files (lnos, twrp, and the two files from OpenGapps .org onto the card.

    That's it. Boot from the card into the TWRP recovery utility, wipe the tablet, install the zip files, and hope it goes better than before. Be aware that this unofficial version of LineageOS does have a few issues, but its the best available for the old Nooks.

    Feel free to PM me if you have difficulty.

    Pete
    2
    I was able to root the stock to Android 7. But now I want to make sure I can go back. I now have Android 7 on there. But, I would like to be able to just take the SD card out and there the stock is. I'm just not really following on how it's done I guess. How did you do it? Can it be done with Android 7? It's not my first time doing this, like when I did CM11, I was able to use leapinlar's post to get back. But the SD card removal method would be so much easier, once it was set up. Plus, my husband would feel better if he could keep stock on his HD+, but have the option of a better system. Here's what I did do.

    I know I'm way overthinking this, but, I guess it's what I know. Using my un-rooted stock Nook HD:

    First I'm using this link file and extracting it, then dragging the MLO (first) to the SD card. Then I copy the other files that were unzipped.

    Then I'm dragging Android 7 CM to the SD card still zipped.

    Lastly I'm dragging the gapps 7.1-pico file down to the SD card along with any other zips that I might find useful, such as Unknown Sources and also TWRP 2.5 .rar zipped file.

    Properly ejected from my laptop, I put the SD card into my powered down Nook HD and fire her up. I backed up and restored the system to the external_sd. Did a factory wipe and reset, then I flashed my zips. Yadda yadda, and I now have Android 7.1.1. Otherwise classic old school procedure, but no stock... :\ Any tips on what I might do to do what you did to get stock to stay?

    First, you seem to be under the impression that the 7.1 OS is running from the SD card. That is not correct. The TWRP wipe/flash process removes stock entirely from your Nook's innards and substitutes Android 7.1. You should remove the SD card when the process is complete and put it somewhere safe. If you want to use an SD card to store data, etc., you need an additional one. The card you used to flash 7.1 is just for backing up, restoring, flashing new OS, etc.

    If I understand you correctly you want to be able to boot into stock or 7.1 at will (from the SD card?). Such a thing is not possible. You can only have one operating system at a time and it's internal. If you want stock, you will need to go into TWRP, wipe out your 7.1 and restore the stock backup. If you want to go back to 7.1, you will have to repeat the procedure, wiping out stock and reflashing 7.1 (presumably from a backup). This is no way to live :eek:

    Is there some reason you desperately want access to stock? Do you have a bunch of B&N purchased books you want to access? If that's the case, you can just install the Nook app on your 7.1 system, sign in, and all your books will be there. The only other advantage of stock I can think of is a working HDMI port, but if that's the issue you can install a CM 12.1 or CM 13 build that will still preserve that function and will be just as functional as 7.1

    So why do you need/want stock so much?