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Is it at all possible to use the NFC to emulate RFID cards?

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WhiterThanWhite

Senior Member
Nov 6, 2011
93
6
One of the main selling points of the Galaxy Nexus for me is NFC. Contactless payments are starting to pop up everywhere here in London, and when Apple releases an NFC-enabled phone I'm sure progress will be increased massively.

Anyways, my question is whether it is possible to use the NFC of the Nexus to scan my RFID building entry card, save the details as a profile and then emulate the card in order to get me into the building using just my phone?

Is there any software like this? Would it even be ethically sound to release such software?
 

copkay

Senior Member
Jul 29, 2010
353
602
From my understanding, this is possible. However, I would imagine the data on your building entry card would have some sort of encryption.
 

krohnjw

Inactive Recognized Developer
Jul 17, 2007
1,987
533
Plainfield
One of the main selling points of the Galaxy Nexus for me is NFC. Contactless payments are starting to pop up everywhere here in London, and when Apple releases an NFC-enabled phone I'm sure progress will be increased massively.

Anyways, my question is whether it is possible to use the NFC of the Nexus to scan my RFID building entry card, save the details as a profile and then emulate the card in order to get me into the building using just my phone?

Is there any software like this? Would it even be ethically sound to release such software?

Card emulation is not part of the SDK and not currently available.

Sent from my Nexus S using xda premium
 

gambiting

Senior Member
Mar 14, 2009
173
51
It's not possible for a very simple reason :p Nexus or any other NFC enabled phone cannot read a Visa PayWave or Mastercard PayPass card just like that. They are encrypted and they will transmit the decrypted information only after receiving correct signal from an authorized terminal. I tried it with my Visa PayWave card and all apps are tried say that it's encrypted and they cannot read it. Then I did some research and it turns out that it can only be read by an authorized reader, which makes a lot of sense for security reasons. So to enable NFC payments your bank would need to create an application for the phone,which would emulate the card, just like Google Wallet does. You can't just read a card and use it.

Btw yes you can use the Google Wallet on the Galaxy nexus,and pay with either the Google pre-paid card or you can register a City card if you are in the US and you happen to have one :p
 
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Evostance

Senior Member
Nov 27, 2008
1,511
332
www.greghesp.com
It's not possible for a very simple reason :p Nexus or any other NFC enabled phone cannot read a Visa PayWave or Mastercard PayPass card just like that. They are encrypted and they will transmit the decrypted information only after receiving correct signal from an authorized terminal. I tried it with my Visa PayWave card and all apps are tried say that it's encrypted and they cannot read it. Then I did some research and it turns out that it can only be read by an authorized reader, which makes a lot of sense for security reasons. So to enable NFC payments your bank would need to create an application for the phone,which would emulate the card, just like Google Wallet does. You can't just read a card and use it.

Btw yes you can use the Google Wallet on the Galaxy nexus,and pay with either the Google pre-paid card or you can register a City card if you are in the US and you happen to have one :p

Pst. That's not what he asked ;)


Sent from my iPad 2 using Tapatalk
 

pukemon

Senior Member
Jul 16, 2010
1,874
157
Richmond, TX
I'd like the same thing. Being able to use my phone to open the doors at work would be fantastic.

I hope you didnt mean physically. And no i would not like those encrypted badges with the capability to be on my phone. Consumers have given enough power as is to corporations. I dont need X corporation having legal rights to track my whereabouts every breath i take becuse their encryption is on my personal OR work phone. No dice.

Sent from my samsung gt i9250 which is in the wrong country.
 

samizad

Senior Member
None of the NFC reader apps that I have tried to use on my Galaxy Nexus can read my smartcards (office doors, public transport card etc). It's a shame ICS doesn't support it but at least now I know why it hasn't been working.

The Samsung Galaxy S2 currently has that. My colleagues use their SG2s to open doors and pay at the office canteen. They can also use them to pay on the public transport system. I presume the NFC smartard emulation is a feature currently in Gingerbread that will eventually come to ICS.

The update that will eventually push ICS to the SG2 must contain NFC smartcard emulation otherwise the users will lose this existing feature.
 

hotleadsingerguy

Senior Member
Jan 12, 2010
925
173
I hope you didnt mean physically. And no i would not like those encrypted badges with the capability to be on my phone. Consumers have given enough power as is to corporations. I dont need X corporation having legal rights to track my whereabouts every breath i take becuse their encryption is on my personal OR work phone. No dice.

Sent from my samsung gt i9250 which is in the wrong country.

What on Earth are you talking about? Give power to corporations? Take your liberal soapbox to another forum, plz.

I'm talking about at *MY* work. All of the doors except the front are locked on our building during business hours. The only way to unlock them is to use an employee badge, which utilizes an RFID tag. Being able to have that tag stored on my phone would be an immense help, since I wouldn't have to remember to take my badge out of the car. I can't tell you how many times I've walked across the parking lot before realizing I left the badge in my car.
 

krohnjw

Inactive Recognized Developer
Jul 17, 2007
1,987
533
Plainfield
None of the NFC reader apps that I have tried to use on my Galaxy Nexus can read my smartcards (office doors, public transport card etc). It's a shame ICS doesn't support it but at least now I know why it hasn't been working.

This depends entirely on the card itself and how it's encoded. Most likely it's an RFID tag that is either not HF (13.56 Mhz) or it's not using the Standard/NDEF read/write keys (in the case of the Mifare tags).

The Samsung Galaxy S2 currently has that. My colleagues use their SG2s to open doors and pay at the office canteen. They can also use them to pay on the public transport system. I presume the NFC smartard emulation is a feature currently in Gingerbread that will eventually come to ICS.


The update that will eventually push ICS to the SG2 must contain NFC smartcard emulation otherwise the users will lose this existing feature.


Gingerbread doesn't do card emulation either. Google has stated in their NFC talks that there are various reasons NFC Card emulation isn't present - one being a lack of a standard.

If it's done on the SII then it's either an addition within the Touchwiz frameworkork (addition of known communication protocols and local storage of card info) or the tags they are using are NDEF (in which case NDEF Push works fine).
 
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pukemon

Senior Member
Jul 16, 2010
1,874
157
Richmond, TX
Exactly what im talking about. Do you thonk your building management or x corporation is going to say suuuure let us put that on your phone so easily and skip all the other security that needs to go along with that now since it is now digitally accessible on an easy to hack phone? Get a grip. I have 4 badges and about 30+ keys and and about 15 elevator access keys. If a badge or certain key is lost you gotta thrlugh procedures. Hopefully nothing that involves gloves but still. If a certain key is lost all the locks gotta get changed if a badge is lost or cloned, a badge can be deactivated but if theyre constantly being cloned, manipulated or bypassed then other/greater security measures have to be used or taken out. So no i dont want a stinking badge on any of my phones.

Sent from my samsung gt i9250 which is in the wrong country.
 

samizad

Senior Member
If it's done on the SII then it's either an addition within the Touchwiz frameworkork (addition of known communication protocols and local storage of card info) or the tags they are using are NDEF (in which case NDEF Push works fine).

You are surely correct. I am speaking about SG2s distributed within South Korea (where I am currently working) and, being a captive market, Samsung can easily adapt the Korean Touchwiz (or even the hardware of the Korean SG2s) to make it possible.

Actually, I have confirmed with people that the public transport NFC is not working with the SG2 but rather with the USim card (integrated NFC) that is given to them via SK Telecom and KT Telecom etc).
 

gambiting

Senior Member
Mar 14, 2009
173
51
My Nexus can read my university's smart card without any trouble(using NFC TagInfo). And I use it to open doors to rooms with restricted access. So I guess it would be possible to emulate it,but I have no idea how to do this.
 

chandlerweb

Senior Member
May 12, 2010
205
35
My Nexus can read my university's smart card without any trouble(using NFC TagInfo). And I use it to open doors to rooms with restricted access. So I guess it would be possible to emulate it,but I have no idea how to do this.

So how did you get your phone to open doors etc, did you have to ask your security team to enable something on the phone?
 

Evostance

Senior Member
Nov 27, 2008
1,511
332
www.greghesp.com
My Nexus can read my university's smart card without any trouble(using NFC TagInfo). And I use it to open doors to rooms with restricted access. So I guess it would be possible to emulate it,but I have no idea how to do this.

It reads mine too and mine has a pin. Might try and test it tomorrow at work

Sent from my Galaxy Nexus using Tapatalk
 

indivisualist

Member
Jan 3, 2012
16
1
Did I understand that right: My Galaxy Nexus can read/write some NFC-Tags, but due to the lack of software protocols has no access to all of them?

I'm quite interested in NFC technology, so naturally I tested an ID card (was recognized) and my chip for the time tracking in the office (was not recognized, but is 13.56 MHz). So my question is – is this "just" a software issue or are there hardware limitations?
 

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    It's not possible for a very simple reason :p Nexus or any other NFC enabled phone cannot read a Visa PayWave or Mastercard PayPass card just like that. They are encrypted and they will transmit the decrypted information only after receiving correct signal from an authorized terminal. I tried it with my Visa PayWave card and all apps are tried say that it's encrypted and they cannot read it. Then I did some research and it turns out that it can only be read by an authorized reader, which makes a lot of sense for security reasons. So to enable NFC payments your bank would need to create an application for the phone,which would emulate the card, just like Google Wallet does. You can't just read a card and use it.

    Btw yes you can use the Google Wallet on the Galaxy nexus,and pay with either the Google pre-paid card or you can register a City card if you are in the US and you happen to have one :p
    1
    None of the NFC reader apps that I have tried to use on my Galaxy Nexus can read my smartcards (office doors, public transport card etc). It's a shame ICS doesn't support it but at least now I know why it hasn't been working.

    This depends entirely on the card itself and how it's encoded. Most likely it's an RFID tag that is either not HF (13.56 Mhz) or it's not using the Standard/NDEF read/write keys (in the case of the Mifare tags).

    The Samsung Galaxy S2 currently has that. My colleagues use their SG2s to open doors and pay at the office canteen. They can also use them to pay on the public transport system. I presume the NFC smartard emulation is a feature currently in Gingerbread that will eventually come to ICS.


    The update that will eventually push ICS to the SG2 must contain NFC smartcard emulation otherwise the users will lose this existing feature.


    Gingerbread doesn't do card emulation either. Google has stated in their NFC talks that there are various reasons NFC Card emulation isn't present - one being a lack of a standard.

    If it's done on the SII then it's either an addition within the Touchwiz frameworkork (addition of known communication protocols and local storage of card info) or the tags they are using are NDEF (in which case NDEF Push works fine).
    1
    So how did you get your phone to open doors etc, did you have to ask your security team to enable something on the phone?

    I believe he's referring to the fact that the card is used to open secure doors.

    Yes, I meant that I use my card to open doors, not my phone :p
    1
    How are you reading your cards? Is there an app that I can try this with?

    oh, it's just raw reading with NFC TagInfo from ResearchLab Hagenberg and NXP TagInfo. The latter correctly identified the card as a Ski pass.
    1
    Exactly what im talking about. Do you thonk your building management or x corporation is going to say suuuure let us put that on your phone so easily and skip all the other security that needs to go along with that now since it is now digitally accessible on an easy to hack phone? Get a grip. I have 4 badges and about 30+ keys and and about 15 elevator access keys. If a badge or certain key is lost you gotta thrlugh procedures. Hopefully nothing that involves gloves but still. If a certain key is lost all the locks gotta get changed if a badge is lost or cloned, a badge can be deactivated but if theyre constantly being cloned, manipulated or bypassed then other/greater security measures have to be used or taken out. So no i dont want a stinking badge on any of my phones.

    Sent from my samsung gt i9250 which is in the wrong country.

    Door access cards are linked to a user profile, whether they have the card or the phone, it is still linked to their account. If the phone or card is lost they would still deactivate it the way they always have. Plus, if the phone is password protected, it is even more secure that an access card which all of the greatest action movies of all time exploit the ease of stealing and using. Plus, security systems have a time access that searches simultaneous access or random access threats, just like credit card companies monitor your spending habits. Irregular activity would be flagged and the account suspended until the user explained.

    Honestly, it is more secure to have it on a locked phone than a lanyard.