Learn to logcat like a Pro!

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lanternslight456

Senior Member
Jan 14, 2011
868
522
www.androidinsomnia.com
adb logcat bootcamp

I'm going to be teaching the basics of logcats. I sat for a few hours a while back and hammered all this stuff out with ckisgen from XDA/ACS holding my hand the whole way, so this is good info here. I see lots of posts about issues people have and no logcats accompanying them. A good logcat is fried gold to a dev troubleshooting a problem. :) I did the whole thing in Ubuntu (Linux) and have listed the Window$ $pecific desktop pathing below the Linux command. UNIVERSAL COMMANDS LINUX COMMANDS WINDOWS COMMANDS.

When I say Terminal, I mean Command Prompt for you Window$ u$er$ (start-run-cmd)

In terminal with your phone plugged into the computer


A Logcat:

Code:
[COLOR=#ff0000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]

This doesn't START logcat, this tells terminal to grab the information already on the device logcat and display it in terminal. This isn't so useful to us. It just scrolls the information in terminal and you can read it there. This is kinda difficult to read though, for one it's constantly scrolling as your phone does things and two, it's likely that your terminal is configured to only allow a certain number of lines to be kept readable before they drop off.


Pipe it to Desktop as a .txt file


Code:
[COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat > ~/Desktop/logcat.txt [/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat > %userprofile%\desktop\logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


This command above will tell the logcat to export the terminal logcat to a .txt file on your desktop called logcat.txt The '>' symbol tells the logcat to pipe to the location listed. This will continue to update even if you open the text file, so long as you have terminal running. It's not done “live” though, you have to either refresh the file, or close it then re-open it. That won't affect anything other than giving you an update. Now we're getting somewhere, but where?


Code:
[COLOR=#ff0000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat > /sdcard/logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


If using Terminal Emulator on your phone instead of a computer setup, this (above) is the code you'd want to use. It will save the logcat.txt to the root of your SD card. Next!


-v long, or not to -v long, that is the question!


Code:
[COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat -v long > ~/Desktop/logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat -v long > %userprofile%\desktop\logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


Now we're telling the logcat to do something more interesting. We are telling it to give us every scrap of information it has. This will space the logcat out nice and pretty and really make things easier to read as well, even giving time stamps of when everything happened! Now you can say “it happened at about 9:30 pm” and we can find that. Winning!
Sometimes you want to filter down the information though. You want to make the dev's life easier. Here is how:

First, a brief on Tags and Priorities.

Tags are going to be what process is actually giving the information, for example 'ActivityManager', 'Database', and 'WindowsManager' are all Tags you can find. There are TONS of these suckers! Research into what your problem is and try to pick out the tag.

Priorities are different. These will tell you how serious the issue at hand is. The priorities are called by their letter code and are:

V Verbose
D Debug
I Info
W Warning
E Error
F Fatal

S Silent (suppress all output)

These are in ascending order. In other words, Verbose or V is going to be the micro information which doesn't really mean much to anyone 99.99% of the time where as Fatal or F is going to be a huge catastrophic issue. When filtering for a Priority it will include the Priority you give PLUS all HIGHER Priorities. So, for example, if you call to filter for Warning or W then it will give you Warning, Error, and Fatal. That is common to filter for. Below are some examples of code:

( PS - you would never actually type or input ‘{‘ or ‘}’ in your logcat commands .. they are in some of the examples below to show you that these are generic modifiers … meaning - if you were actually inputting the command you would replace the {Tag} with an actual Tag, like: ActivityManager or GTalkService .. in the same way you would replace {Priority} with an actual Priority, such as: W or E )


Examples


Code:
[COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat {Tag}:{Priority} *:S > ~/Desktop/logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat {Tag}:{Priority} *:S > %userprofile%\desktop\logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


The above line is if you know exactly what Tag (GTalkService or ActivityManager) and Priority (W or E) you are looking for.


Code:
[COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat *:{Priority} *:S > ~/Desktop/logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat *:{Priority} *:S > %userprofile%\desktop\logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


The above line is if you don't know the Tag, but know the Priority. The * is a wild card that basically means all/any. An example of a VERY valuable logcat could be:


Code:
[COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat *:W *:S > ~/Desktop/logcatALLwarnings.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat *:W *:S > %userprofile%\desktop\logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


So, the command above would give you all tags that had a priority of Warning, Error, or Fatal. It would silence (not show) everything else and would pipe the output of your log to your desktop as a text file named logcatALLwarnings.txt … moving along …


Code:
[COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat {Tag}:V *:S > ~/Desktop/logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat {Tag}:V *:S > %userprofile%\desktop\logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


The above line is if you know the Tag but want to see all Priorities. {Tag}:V outputs all priorities for the specific Tag you’ve entered because it calls for the V (Verbose) priority, which is the very lowest priority … and as you recall, it always gives you the priority you’ve asked for AND above.

The *:S tells the logcat to Silence (or ignore) all lines/messages that have not otherwise been specifically called for using these filter expressions. This CAN cause issues though, sometimes it will silence what you're looking for / everything.

A final specific example from my phone to be clear. I got a Database Tag with an Info Priority, if I wanted to see all instances of this happening, I could use the following code:


Code:
[COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat Database:I *:S > ~/Desktop/logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat Database:I *:S > %userprofile%\desktop\logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


Or, if I had an ActivityManager Warning I could use


Code:
[COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat ActivityManager:W *:S > ~/Desktop/logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat ActivityManager:W *:S > %userprofile%\desktop\logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


Ok, now we're going to the show! You know the tools, but how do I use them? Glad you asked!

For the first time you boot a ROM/Kernel bundled together (IE InsomMIUI 1.12.2) or for just a kernel you're going to do the following:

Once you're finished full wiping and installing the ROM, but haven't rebooted the phone yet. (Or wiping just the caches for a separate Kernel):

  • Open Terminal on your computer
  • enter the following code
Code:
[COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat -v long > ~/Desktop/logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#0000ff]
[/COLOR][COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat -v long > %userprofile%\desktop\logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]



  • Name the logcat something useful. A good format is to use you're initials, rom name, what it is, and date. This way it stands out. So the code with the really long but helpful file name would be:
Code:
[COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat -v long > ~/Desktop/JH_InsomMIUI1122_firstboot_5Dect11.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
[COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat -v long > %userprofile%\desktop\JH_InsomMIUI1122_firstboot_5Dect11.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


  • Yes, I know that's a long name, but we look at dozens of these things, it helps!
    • In recovery tell it to reboot the phone. The logcat will start recording internally on your device at boot automatically.
    • Once the phone is at the lockscreen let it sit for 5 minutes.
    • Unlock the phone and let it sit for about 10 seconds.
    • Restart the phone.
    • Once you restart the phone open the logcat file on your desktop to make sure it’s not blank/empty/something went wrong and if everything’s golden - send to your favorite developer (ME! :D ).


  • FYI , the -v option sets the output format. -v long after the logcat command formats the log so that it adds a date and time stamp to each line. It also separates each line with a blank line .. making the log as a whole much easier to look through.


  • That's it, you should be off to the races with these logcats. I hope this has helped!
 

afbengochea

Senior Member
Jan 10, 2012
665
130
Im still very much a noob and dont like posting unless necessary but would like to help when I can. Is there a way to do this on a mac?
 

lanternslight456

Senior Member
Jan 14, 2011
868
522
www.androidinsomnia.com
It should be really similar to linux. You'll have to have the sdk installed and running which I don't know how to do on mac but the commands should be similar. Let me look into it.

this has been a message from the dead pool.
 

Guru Zeb

Senior Member
Jan 17, 2012
122
35
Up North !!!!!!!!!
Good post m8 :D
One minor criticism, not just of this post but many "How to's" on this forum.

A clear description of what a logcat is and how it maybe useful would go a long way to help educate the inexperienced.
I only say this as i have non techy friends who constantly complain about this issue.
They go looking for info to sort their own issues out and are confronted with jargon on jargon on jargon ..... with no 'Plain English explanation"
We should all try to remember not everyone possesses the same tech knowledge, and we all where N00bs once we only ascended to being the godlike superusers we are due to others making knowledge clearly available to us.
Th idea that "if you don't understand then this isn't for you" is pretty narrow and arrogant.
 

PrinceFX

Member
Nov 13, 2009
41
5
When I run logcat on my phone, using the command

Code:
adb logcat -v long > /sdcard/logcat.txt


the next line display is

Code:
- waiting for device -


and then does nothing. What am I doing wrong?
 
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Jamison904

Senior Member
Jun 9, 2009
5,449
15,168
Jacksonville, Florida
Adb doesn't see your devices. Do you have debugging turned on in settings? If you do try:
Code:
adb devices
If you don't see anything you don't have debugging turned on or you don't have the drivers installed for your devices. Or it isn't plugged in. ;)
 
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lanternslight456

Senior Member
Jan 14, 2011
868
522
www.androidinsomnia.com
When I run logcat on my phone, using the command

Code:
adb logcat -v long > /sdcard/logcat.txt


the next line display is

Code:
- waiting for device -


and then does nothing. What am I doing wrong?

Seems I need to fix it. For doing this on the phone you should enter 'su' to gain superuser than type "logcat..." and whatever. It reads logcat directly, not through adb. Sorry about missing your reply earlier. Hope this helps. :)

Sent from my HTC Glacier using Tapatalk 2
 
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elherr

Senior Member
Jul 26, 2011
382
138
Isla de Malhado
Thanks for the article. I also like using the '-t' switch to grab the last n log entries (e.g., 'adb logcat -t 100 -v time'). Also, if you need a bit more compact log output, using the 'time' format works nicely.
 
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The-Droidster

Senior Member
May 27, 2012
1,295
891
XDA 24 x 7
This is a great article. I have learnt a lot. Could you take time to add a description about the various switches like -f, or -t etc that can be used with logcat. It's really very difficult for me to understand those switches...plzz:D Will be really helpful for others as well.:)
 

elherr

Senior Member
Jul 26, 2011
382
138
Isla de Malhado
This is a great article. I have learnt a lot. Could you take time to add a description about the various switches like -f, or -t etc that can be used with logcat. It's really very difficult for me to understand those switches...plzz:D Will be really helpful for others as well.:)
Code:
[email protected]:/ $ logcat --help
Usage: logcat [options] [filterspecs]
options include:
  -s              Set default filter to silent.
                  Like specifying filterspec '*:s'
  -f <filename>   Log to file. Default to stdout
  -r [<kbytes>]   Rotate log every kbytes. (16 if unspecified). Requires -f
  -n <count>      Sets max number of rotated logs to <count>, default 4
  -v <format>     Sets the log print format, where <format> is one of:

                  brief process tag thread raw time threadtime long

  -c              clear (flush) the entire log and exit
  -d              dump the log and then exit (don't block)
  -t <count>      print only the most recent <count> lines (implies -d)
  -g              get the size of the log's ring buffer and exit
  -b <buffer>     Request alternate ring buffer, 'main', 'system', 'radio'
                  or 'events'. Multiple -b parameters are allowed and the
                  results are interleaved. The default is -b main -b system.
  -B              output the log in binary
  -C              colored output
filterspecs are a series of 
  <tag>[:priority]

where <tag> is a log component tag (or * for all) and priority is:
  V    Verbose
  D    Debug
  I    Info
  W    Warn
  E    Error
  F    Fatal
  S    Silent (supress all output)

'*' means '*:d' and <tag> by itself means <tag>:v

If not specified on the commandline, filterspec is set from ANDROID_LOG_TAGS.
If no filterspec is found, filter defaults to '*:I'

If not specified with -v, format is set from ANDROID_PRINTF_LOG
or defaults to "brief"

The help output is pretty clear. '-f' allows you to save log in file. '-t' specifies how many lines for logcat to print (counting backward from present).

example:
logcat -v time -t 100 -f /sdcard/logtest1.txt

This prints last 100 lines in 'time' format to file logtest1.txt

Play with it and have fun.
 
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Johndo4550

Senior Member
Jun 16, 2010
100
92
Seems I need to fix it. For doing this on the phone you should enter 'su' to gain superuser than type "logcat..." and whatever. It reads logcat directly, not through adb. Sorry about missing your reply earlier. Hope this helps. :)

Sent from my HTC Glacier using Tapatalk 2

Same thing happens to me :(
I've have checked my settings, and I can't see anything "wrong"

I've also tried different apps, like alogcat but they don't show anything either.
 

elherr

Senior Member
Jul 26, 2011
382
138
Isla de Malhado
I don't have to 'su' on SGS2/I777 with CM9 ROM. Works for me from ADB or in phone shell.

It probably depends on the ROM you are running and permissions set.
 

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  • 117
    adb logcat bootcamp

    I'm going to be teaching the basics of logcats. I sat for a few hours a while back and hammered all this stuff out with ckisgen from XDA/ACS holding my hand the whole way, so this is good info here. I see lots of posts about issues people have and no logcats accompanying them. A good logcat is fried gold to a dev troubleshooting a problem. :) I did the whole thing in Ubuntu (Linux) and have listed the Window$ $pecific desktop pathing below the Linux command. UNIVERSAL COMMANDS LINUX COMMANDS WINDOWS COMMANDS.

    When I say Terminal, I mean Command Prompt for you Window$ u$er$ (start-run-cmd)

    In terminal with your phone plugged into the computer


    A Logcat:

    Code:
    [COLOR=#ff0000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]

    This doesn't START logcat, this tells terminal to grab the information already on the device logcat and display it in terminal. This isn't so useful to us. It just scrolls the information in terminal and you can read it there. This is kinda difficult to read though, for one it's constantly scrolling as your phone does things and two, it's likely that your terminal is configured to only allow a certain number of lines to be kept readable before they drop off.


    Pipe it to Desktop as a .txt file


    Code:
    [COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat > ~/Desktop/logcat.txt [/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
    [COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat > %userprofile%\desktop\logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


    This command above will tell the logcat to export the terminal logcat to a .txt file on your desktop called logcat.txt The '>' symbol tells the logcat to pipe to the location listed. This will continue to update even if you open the text file, so long as you have terminal running. It's not done “live” though, you have to either refresh the file, or close it then re-open it. That won't affect anything other than giving you an update. Now we're getting somewhere, but where?


    Code:
    [COLOR=#ff0000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat > /sdcard/logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


    If using Terminal Emulator on your phone instead of a computer setup, this (above) is the code you'd want to use. It will save the logcat.txt to the root of your SD card. Next!


    -v long, or not to -v long, that is the question!


    Code:
    [COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat -v long > ~/Desktop/logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
    [COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat -v long > %userprofile%\desktop\logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


    Now we're telling the logcat to do something more interesting. We are telling it to give us every scrap of information it has. This will space the logcat out nice and pretty and really make things easier to read as well, even giving time stamps of when everything happened! Now you can say “it happened at about 9:30 pm” and we can find that. Winning!
    Sometimes you want to filter down the information though. You want to make the dev's life easier. Here is how:

    First, a brief on Tags and Priorities.

    Tags are going to be what process is actually giving the information, for example 'ActivityManager', 'Database', and 'WindowsManager' are all Tags you can find. There are TONS of these suckers! Research into what your problem is and try to pick out the tag.

    Priorities are different. These will tell you how serious the issue at hand is. The priorities are called by their letter code and are:

    V Verbose
    D Debug
    I Info
    W Warning
    E Error
    F Fatal

    S Silent (suppress all output)

    These are in ascending order. In other words, Verbose or V is going to be the micro information which doesn't really mean much to anyone 99.99% of the time where as Fatal or F is going to be a huge catastrophic issue. When filtering for a Priority it will include the Priority you give PLUS all HIGHER Priorities. So, for example, if you call to filter for Warning or W then it will give you Warning, Error, and Fatal. That is common to filter for. Below are some examples of code:

    ( PS - you would never actually type or input ‘{‘ or ‘}’ in your logcat commands .. they are in some of the examples below to show you that these are generic modifiers … meaning - if you were actually inputting the command you would replace the {Tag} with an actual Tag, like: ActivityManager or GTalkService .. in the same way you would replace {Priority} with an actual Priority, such as: W or E )


    Examples


    Code:
    [COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat {Tag}:{Priority} *:S > ~/Desktop/logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
    [COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat {Tag}:{Priority} *:S > %userprofile%\desktop\logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


    The above line is if you know exactly what Tag (GTalkService or ActivityManager) and Priority (W or E) you are looking for.


    Code:
    [COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat *:{Priority} *:S > ~/Desktop/logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
    [COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat *:{Priority} *:S > %userprofile%\desktop\logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


    The above line is if you don't know the Tag, but know the Priority. The * is a wild card that basically means all/any. An example of a VERY valuable logcat could be:


    Code:
    [COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat *:W *:S > ~/Desktop/logcatALLwarnings.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
    [COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat *:W *:S > %userprofile%\desktop\logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


    So, the command above would give you all tags that had a priority of Warning, Error, or Fatal. It would silence (not show) everything else and would pipe the output of your log to your desktop as a text file named logcatALLwarnings.txt … moving along …


    Code:
    [COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat {Tag}:V *:S > ~/Desktop/logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
    [COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat {Tag}:V *:S > %userprofile%\desktop\logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


    The above line is if you know the Tag but want to see all Priorities. {Tag}:V outputs all priorities for the specific Tag you’ve entered because it calls for the V (Verbose) priority, which is the very lowest priority … and as you recall, it always gives you the priority you’ve asked for AND above.

    The *:S tells the logcat to Silence (or ignore) all lines/messages that have not otherwise been specifically called for using these filter expressions. This CAN cause issues though, sometimes it will silence what you're looking for / everything.

    A final specific example from my phone to be clear. I got a Database Tag with an Info Priority, if I wanted to see all instances of this happening, I could use the following code:


    Code:
    [COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat Database:I *:S > ~/Desktop/logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
    [COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat Database:I *:S > %userprofile%\desktop\logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


    Or, if I had an ActivityManager Warning I could use


    Code:
    [COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat ActivityManager:W *:S > ~/Desktop/logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
    [COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat ActivityManager:W *:S > %userprofile%\desktop\logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


    Ok, now we're going to the show! You know the tools, but how do I use them? Glad you asked!

    For the first time you boot a ROM/Kernel bundled together (IE InsomMIUI 1.12.2) or for just a kernel you're going to do the following:

    Once you're finished full wiping and installing the ROM, but haven't rebooted the phone yet. (Or wiping just the caches for a separate Kernel):

    • Open Terminal on your computer
    • enter the following code
    Code:
    [COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat -v long > ~/Desktop/logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR][COLOR=#0000ff]
    [/COLOR][COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat -v long > %userprofile%\desktop\logcat.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]



    • Name the logcat something useful. A good format is to use you're initials, rom name, what it is, and date. This way it stands out. So the code with the really long but helpful file name would be:
    Code:
    [COLOR=#008000][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat -v long > ~/Desktop/JH_InsomMIUI1122_firstboot_5Dect11.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]
    [COLOR=#0000ff][FONT=Arial][SIZE=3]adb logcat -v long > %userprofile%\desktop\JH_InsomMIUI1122_firstboot_5Dect11.txt[/SIZE][/FONT][/COLOR]


    • Yes, I know that's a long name, but we look at dozens of these things, it helps!
      • In recovery tell it to reboot the phone. The logcat will start recording internally on your device at boot automatically.
      • Once the phone is at the lockscreen let it sit for 5 minutes.
      • Unlock the phone and let it sit for about 10 seconds.
      • Restart the phone.
      • Once you restart the phone open the logcat file on your desktop to make sure it’s not blank/empty/something went wrong and if everything’s golden - send to your favorite developer (ME! :D ).


    • FYI , the -v option sets the output format. -v long after the logcat command formats the log so that it adds a date and time stamp to each line. It also separates each line with a blank line .. making the log as a whole much easier to look through.


    • That's it, you should be off to the races with these logcats. I hope this has helped!
    6
    Good post m8 :D
    One minor criticism, not just of this post but many "How to's" on this forum.

    A clear description of what a logcat is and how it maybe useful would go a long way to help educate the inexperienced.
    I only say this as i have non techy friends who constantly complain about this issue.
    They go looking for info to sort their own issues out and are confronted with jargon on jargon on jargon ..... with no 'Plain English explanation"
    We should all try to remember not everyone possesses the same tech knowledge, and we all where N00bs once we only ascended to being the godlike superusers we are due to others making knowledge clearly available to us.
    Th idea that "if you don't understand then this isn't for you" is pretty narrow and arrogant.
    2
    When I run logcat on my phone, using the command

    Code:
    adb logcat -v long > /sdcard/logcat.txt


    the next line display is

    Code:
    - waiting for device -


    and then does nothing. What am I doing wrong?

    Seems I need to fix it. For doing this on the phone you should enter 'su' to gain superuser than type "logcat..." and whatever. It reads logcat directly, not through adb. Sorry about missing your reply earlier. Hope this helps. :)

    Sent from my HTC Glacier using Tapatalk 2
    1
    Wow this is great I hope People make use of this.
    1
    When I run logcat on my phone, using the command

    Code:
    adb logcat -v long > /sdcard/logcat.txt


    the next line display is

    Code:
    - waiting for device -


    and then does nothing. What am I doing wrong?