Nexus 7 Screen Replacement Repair Guide

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repairsuniverse

Senior Member
Aug 11, 2010
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778
Want to gain access to the internals of your Nexus 7? This repair guide will walk you through replacing a broken or damaged screen or any other internal components on your Nexus 7.

This repair disassembly guide will help you to install the following Google Asus Nexus 7 parts:
  • Google Asus Nexus 7 LCD + Touch Screen Digitizer
  • Internal parts on the Nexus 7

Tools Required:
  • Safe Open Pry Tool
  • Small Phillips Screwdriver
  • Adhesive Strips (For Touch Screen Replacements)
  • Hot Air Gun / Hair Dryer

Google Asus Nexus 7 tablet Take apart guide:

  • Power off the device
  • Begin by using the safe open pry tool to separate the back cover from the device by sliding the pry tool which release the clips and the back cover should come right off

nexus-7-repair-1.jpg

Figure 1​
  • With the back cover removed, disconnect the battery by simply pulling out the connection with the safe open pry tool

nexus-7-repair-2.jpg

Figure 2​
  • You can now remove the battery using the safe open pry tool
  • Starting from the lower right side, slowly start pulling up the copper tape
  • Gently remove the black tape covering the LCD connection, Note- the metal shield may come off with the tape which is fine
  • Next you will need to release 5 connections located in this area, the 2 for the yellow ribbon (jaw connection) is for the USB and audio jack, the 2 jaw connections next to each other are for the touch screen digitizer and the single pop connection is for the LCD
  • On the top left (under the information sticker) you will need lift up and release the jaw connection holding in the volume button flex cable and then remove the cable which is held in place by adhesive
  • Using the small Phillips screwdriver you will need to remove 7 Phillips screws which are holding the motherboard in place

nexus-7-repair-4.jpg

Figure 3​
  • On the bottom remove 5 Phillips screws which are holding the audio jack and USB charging port

nexus-7-repair-4.jpg

Figure 4​
  • Around the perimeter there is 14 more screws that will need to be removed in order to remove the mid frame
  • Next remove the jumper flex cable by releasing the jaw connection

nexus-7-repair-5.jpg

Figure 5​
  • Now you will need to apply heat, use a hot hair dryer or heat gun for about 15 seconds on each side warming and loosening the adhesive
  • You can now separate the screen assembly from the frame of the front assembly
  • Simply replace the damaged parts with the new ones and reverse the order to put your tablet back together again.
 
Last edited:

graphdarnell

Senior Member
Jan 25, 2012
714
158
Want to gain access to the internals of your Nexus 7? This repair guide will walk you through replacing a broken or damaged screen or any other internal components on your Nexus 7.

This repair disassembly guide will help you to install the following Google Asus Nexus 7 parts:
...
...
[*]Simply replace the damaged parts with the new ones and reverse the order to put your tablet back together again.
[/LIST]

It is said everywhere that the touchscreen is "fused" to the LCD, so as to make an effort to separate them royally futile. How that's determined goes unsaid, but my understanding of "fusing" means that the 2 pieces of glass are melted by heat together, which process would merge them into one unit. Which I don't think is the case since digitizers and LCDs are sold as separate units all over the place, and scrutinizing the edge of new and old LCDs from high-resolution pics suggests they're just bonded to the digitizers.

The attached thumbs below are examples: Pieces of the digitizer where highlighted (jagged border) broke off it, revealing the perfectly symmetric shape of the LCD beneath. Should they be fused, breaking one would necessarily break the other in the same pattern. Of course, I may be wrong, but until someone other than an Asus apologizer can prove otherwise...

If they are just bonded - not "fused" - together, then there could be a way to separate them. The question is whether it can be done without damaging one or the other, depending on what needs to be replaced. The majority of cases I've seen deal with broken digitizers. At this point, I'm willing to tackle this task just to find out, but would like as much input as possible before engaging, whether it be heat, solvents, or other means. So please, voice your thinking and experiences. (People with experience in glass working and their ideas as to what kind of glue would've been used for this would be immensely helpful).

The unit is obviously poorly designed unless your aim is to coerce consumers to buy some part they don't need. Some claim it is to prevent dust specks from getting in between, but I'm not aware of countless other tabs with separable pieces representing a major problem when replacing one or the other. Again, do pitch in to help. Thank you.
 
Last edited:

repairsuniverse

Senior Member
Aug 11, 2010
624
778
I would have to agree with you about the term "fused" compared to "bonded". The Nexus 7 is definitely bonded (by our definition). It is an EXTREMELY sticky bonding adhesive holding the screens together. Like many other "bonded" screen assemblies, the screens can be separated, with enough time and heat. However, there is where you run into the big issue - how to clean off the leftover adhesive.. The LCD is obviously going to be fragile, so an extreme amount of patients would be needed. Using an adhesive solvent to remove all the adhesive would raise a few issues - weakening the LCD screen (possible long term damage?), scratches, and other surface damages to the LCD.

The final issue with this will be how to attach the new screen. Using traditional adhesive may cause the touch screen to press against the LCD causing bubbling/discoloration/etc. We have seen many companies who have the same (or similar?) adhesive used to initially bond the two screens and performed this repair successfully, but without the right tools and experience with it, the full screen assembly is highly suggested.
 
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graphdarnell

Senior Member
Jan 25, 2012
714
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Adhesive

I would have to agree with you about the term "fused" compared to "bonded". The Nexus 7 is definitely bonded (by our definition). It is an EXTREMELY sticky bonding adhesive holding the screens together. Like many other "bonded" screen assemblies, the screens can be separated, with enough time and heat. However, there is where you run into the big issue - how to clean off the leftover adhesive.. The LCD is obviously going to be fragile, so an extreme amount of patients would be needed. Using an adhesive solvent to remove all the adhesive would raise a few issues - weakening the LCD screen (possible long term damage?), scratches, and other surface damages to the LCD.

The final issue with this will be how to attach the new screen. Using traditional adhesive may cause the touch screen to press against the LCD causing bubbling/discoloration/etc. We have seen many companies who have the same (or similar?) adhesive used to initially bond the two screens and performed this repair successfully, but without the right tools and experience with it, the full screen assembly is highly suggested.

To me the pressing issue is how to separate them. Once that's done, instead of using optical adhesive patch that would cover the whole LCD surface, why not use strong adhesive along its borders only? Such way doesn't differ from bonding the 2 components in other tabs and won't raise any specter of air bubbles trapped in between. In the alternative, should one break both in the process, one can buy the 2 parts separately and bond them together on one's own. Granted, the saving will be minimal for now, but it gives the knowledge, and the ease of replacing just one part next time either cracks. Am I making sense?

Add: cleaning off the leftover adhesive shouldn't be too much of a problem with solvent like goo-gone if you leave it on the surface for half-a-day. I've done it with another Asus LCD screen and no damage resulted therefrom.
 
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xavierxxx2p

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Jun 11, 2013
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san diego
To me the pressing issue is how to separate them. Once that's done, instead of using optical adhesive patch that would cover the whole LCD surface, why not use strong adhesive along its borders only? Such way doesn't differ from bonding the 2 components in other tabs and won't raise any specter of air bubbles trapped in between. In the alternative, should one break both in the process, one can buy the 2 parts separately and bond them together on one's own. Granted, the saving will be minimal for now, but it gives the knowledge, and the ease of replacing just one part next time either cracks. Am I making sense?

Add: cleaning off the leftover adhesive shouldn't be too much of a problem with solvent like goo-gone if you leave it on the surface for half-a-day. I've done it with another Asus LCD screen and no damage resulted therefrom.

tried it
 

repairsuniverse

Senior Member
Aug 11, 2010
624
778
Yes I understand what you are meaning.

If you increased the lift of adhesive to avoid bubbles or LCD pressure I would be slightly concerned about how the digitizer would then fit in the frame/device. The glass could be protruding from the frame slightly, allowing it to get caught. But if it is possible to just stack the adhesive a bit more than then that is a great way to only have to replace one screen for the rest of the device's life.

Interesting about your note about Goo-Gone. I would have suspected that a solvent like that would cause some damage to the outer layer of the LCD. From experience and other techs I understand that that aggressive of a solvent can cause brittleness.
 
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graphdarnell

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Jan 25, 2012
714
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And what was the outcome, if you care to share?

---------- Post added at 11:40 PM ---------- Previous post was at 11:20 PM ----------

Yes I understand what you are meaning.

If you increased the lift of adhesive to avoid bubbles or LCD pressure I would be slightly concerned about how the digitizer would then fit in the frame/device. The glass could be protruding from the frame slightly, allowing it to get caught. But if it is possible to just stack the adhesive a bit more than then that is a great way to only have to replace one screen for the rest of the device's life.

Interesting about your note about Goo-Gone. I would have suspected that a solvent like that would cause some damage to the outer layer of the LCD. From experience and other techs I understand that that aggressive of a solvent can cause brittleness.

I would think a thin layer of flexible epoxy wouldn't add that much to the thickness of the glass, given that the bezel still allows a thin margin in height.
 

repairsuniverse

Senior Member
Aug 11, 2010
624
778
I would think a thin layer of flexible epoxy wouldn't add that much to the thickness of the glass, given that the bezel still allows a thin margin in height.

A bit of epoxy may be the trick. Let us know if you follow through with the project and let us know the outcome!
 

DeGon

Senior Member
Mar 23, 2008
104
46
I'm kind of tied up for the time being, but certainly will let you know how it turns out.

Hi there,

I wonder if you were successful in separating the digitizer from the LCD. I will get a broken Nexus 7 and am also looking for a solution. I looked a bit into this and found these informations that could help...

I assume the pro's do it somehow like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CfuTVjI_Wao

They use heating plates like this one: https://www.gounlock.com/details.php?itemId=7192

There's an interesting note about temperatures:

Different materials of LCD, digitizer and glue requires different temperature. If the temperature is too high, it may damage the part. So it's better to start at a lower temperature first, and increase it when it's necessary. For example, you can start at 100C, put the LCD/digitizer combo on the board for 5 munites. If the glue is still not softened, then increase by 10C or 20C each time until you get to a working temperature. Next time when you work on the same LCD/digitizer combo, you can start with this optimum temperature right the way.

I'd start at lower degrees, maybe 60° C and see if I can get some kinde of wire beween digitizer and glass. Maybe I'd start with fishing line or dental floss?

And here are some more machines, which are capable of doing this. Note that they always heat the things:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0r7hacgrIO8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MAF6tfgZnWc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cgbNz8mLWRs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=FL6s5F-0yqc
you see that there is a small line or wire that cuts the digitizer off the glass...

The same method could be possible to do with tablets, if you beleive this chinese vendor of "refurbishing machines":
http://www.aliexpress.com/item-img/...eperator-refurbishment-machine/939659104.html

This one is also interesting. Look how he takes off the glass of an iphone 4 [at 2:00] and then removes the glue form the LCD screen [around 7:41] : http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=QQOVuZxj8oM

Or you can use a product like this:
http://lcdglue.com/LCD-Glue-Remover.html

One problem could be the size of the Nexus 7. It's bigger than all the devices we see in these videos. But theoretically it should work exactly the same way...

If that is all true, one needs:

1. A controllable heating plate (or a hot air gun and an infrared thermometer to check temperatures)
2. Some kind of wire that is good enough to stand the heat but doesn't hurt the LCD
3. Something to hold the glass while you saw with the wire
4. If successful, you need the right liquid to remove the glue off the LCD
5. A replacement glass/digitizer unit and your recovered LCD
6. An idea how to align the LCD right (ar an LCD calibration app for afterwards)
7. A liquid adhesive for touchscreens (Liquid Optical Clear Adhesive) or any other method to stick the digitizer to the LCD

This is all theoretical, but points 1-5 seem to possible. I am not yet clear how to achieve points 6-7.

I'll get a broken Nexus 7 in some days and I'll try to experiment with the broken display unit. In the worst case I have to replace LCD and digitizer...

Thanks for letting us know once you try something...
rgds
 
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graphdarnell

Senior Member
Jan 25, 2012
714
158
Hi there,

I wonder if you were successful in separating the digitizer from the LCD. I will get a broken Nexus 7 and am also looking for a solution. I looked a bit into this and found these informations that could help...

I assume the pro's do it somehow like this: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CfuTVjI_Wao

They use heating plates like this one: https://www.gounlock.com/details.php?itemId=7192

There's an interesting note about temperatures:



I'd start at lower degrees, maybe 60° C and see if I can get some kinde of wire beween digitizer and glass. Maybe I'd start with fishing line or dental floss?

And here are some more machines, which are capable of doing this. Note that they always heat the things:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0r7hacgrIO8
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MAF6tfgZnWc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cgbNz8mLWRs
http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=FL6s5F-0yqc
you see that there is a small line or wire that cuts the digitizer off the glass...

The same method could be possible to do with tablets, if you beleive this chinese vendor of "refurbishing machines":
http://www.aliexpress.com/item-img/...eperator-refurbishment-machine/939659104.html

This one is also interesting. Look how he takes off the glass of an iphone 4 [at 2:00] and then removes the glue form the LCD screen [around 7:41] : http://www.youtube.com/watch?NR=1&feature=endscreen&v=QQOVuZxj8oM

Or you can use a product like this:
http://lcdglue.com/LCD-Glue-Remover.html

One problem could be the size of the Nexus 7. It's bigger than all the devices we see in these videos. But theoretically it should work exactly the same way...

If that is all true, one needs:

1. A controllable heating plate (or a hot air gun and an infrared thermometer to check temperatures)
2. Some kind of wire that is good enough to stand the heat but doesn't hurt the LCD
3. Something to hold the glass while you saw with the wire
4. If successful, you need the right liquid to remove the glue off the LCD
5. A replacement glass/digitizer unit and your recovered LCD
6. An idea how to align the LCD right (ar an LCD calibration app for afterwards)
7. A liquid adhesive for touchscreens (Liquid Optical Clear Adhesive) or any other method to stick the digitizer to the LCD

This is all theoretical, but points 1-5 seem to possible. I am not yet clear how to achieve points 6-7.

I'll get a broken Nexus 7 in some days and I'll try to experiment with the broken display unit. In the worst case I have to replace LCD and digitizer...

Thanks for letting us know once you try something...
rgds

Have the feeling that either fishing line or dental floss wouldn't do: they might either melt or snap, since the adhesive seems pretty strong, though I doubt they applied anything stronger than that used on other tablets. I would try an E guitar string (1st one and the thinnest) in lieu of a metal wire you see in the youtube video. Since it's smooth, it hopefully won't scratch the LCD. I would do one corner at a time, and would not saw, but rather slice through when the glue is sufficiently softened. Still busy and haven't gotten around to it yet, but would welcome any progress report.
 
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DeGon

Senior Member
Mar 23, 2008
104
46
I would try an E guitar string (1st one and the thinnest) in lieu of a metal wire you see in the youtube video.

Good Idea. I'll try that. Fishing line would maybe work if it's not too hot.

Another idea I had for the warming plate was to take an iron you use to iron clothes. Attach it somehow to an aluminium plate and turn it upside down, then heat on the weakest level you have (but inform yourself how hot that is befre you do that), Mybe you have to turn it on and off to get a low temperature.

I'll try it with a plastic welding plate (http://www.rothenberger-asia.com/products/producttype/slgdazgj/roweldr-he-heating-plates.html) as my father has such a thing.
 

DeGon

Senior Member
Mar 23, 2008
104
46
That's another thing I found. The specs of the LCD that is used in the Nexus 7 (or at least in most):

HYDIS HV070WX2-1E0

http://www.azdisplays.com/PDF/HV070WX2-1E0.pdf

96UGLDI.jpg


On one page there are reliability tests. There it is noted, that the LCD can stand 80°C in dry atmosphere. So that could be the first temperature to try to separate the LCD form the digitizer.
 
Last edited:

DeGon

Senior Member
Mar 23, 2008
104
46
Today my broken Nexus 7 16GB I picked up for 45$ arrived. i couldn't wait to try separating the LCD from the digitizer.

Tatttatataaa! Success! I just completed steps 1-3 from my previous post.
LCD and digitizer are separated now. At no additional cost, just around 90 minutes time and some things from my personal scrap yard.

PbUZMr8.jpg

Digitizer and LCD are separated. LCD is still working, but has still glue on it.

This was my setup:

- The disassembled screen unit (only digitizer and LCD)
- A copper plate, bigger than the nexus clamped in a workbench (I had that one by accident, other metal or aluminium plates could work too)
- Two metal bars and c-clamps to fix the glass (digitizer) onto the copper plate. The whole thing shouldn't move
- A hair dryer with enough power to heat the coopper plate towards 50-70° C (That's what I think it was)
- Fishing line (Extra strong black line, has some kind of structure, thats good for sawing)
- two handles I could tye the fising line to, to have a good grip

First I tied the fishing line to my handles (the red tool and the metal tool in one of the pictures). Then I warmed the whole thing for about 5 minutes looking for a good heat dissipation, not too hot on one spot but as equally hot as possible. I left the hair dryer blowing next to the copper plate so it would not cool down so fast. Then I took my handles and started sawing slowly and carefully by tearing the line trough the glue between LCD and digitizer. I remarked that it is easier when sawing a bit, than just pulling it true the glue (the line then snapped faster). I paid attention that I didn't lift the LCD with the fishing line. 4-5 times the line snapped and I had to start over, but it finally worked. I always had the dryer on but changed position sometimes that the whole thing won't heat up too much. Finally I was able to tear the LCD carefully off the shattered glass. The glass stayed compact so I think theres another film layer on it. Finally I tested the LCD and it worked fine. I couldn't see any flaws.

You can see an album of pictures here: http://imgur.com/a/L1Ya0

Now the next step is to clean off the glue... Have to find the right liquid...

btw. excuse my bad english but I was a bit excited and in a hurry...

Here's another video showing the same principle on a phone: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=96K8cr0id0Q
 
Last edited:

graphdarnell

Senior Member
Jan 25, 2012
714
158
Today my broken Nexus 7 16GB I picked up for 45$ arrived. i couldn't wait to try separating the LCD from the digitizer.

Tatttatataaa! Success! I just completed steps 1-3 from my previous post.
LCD and digitizer are separated now. At no additional cost, just around 90 minutes time and some things from my personal scrap yard.

PbUZMr8.jpg

Digitizer and LCD are separated. LCD is still working, but has still glue on it.

This was my setup:

- The disassembled screen unit (only digitizer and LCD)
- A copper plate, bigger than the nexus clamped in a workbench (I had that one by accident, other metal or aluminium plates could work too)
- Two metal bars and c-clamps to fix the glass (digitizer) onto the copper plate. The whole thing shouldn't move
- A hair dryer with enough power to heat the coopper plate towards 50-70° C (That's what I think it was)
- Fishing line (Extra strong black line, has some kind of structure, thats good for sawing)
- two handles I could tye the fising line to, to have a good grip

First I tied the fishing line to my handles (the red tool and the metal tool in one of the pictures). Then I warmed the whole thing for about 5 minutes looking for a good heat dissipation, not too hot on one spot but as equally hot as possible. I left the hair dryer blowing next to the copper plate so it would not cool down so fast. Then I took my handles and started sawing slowly and carefully by tearing the line trough the glue between LCD and digitizer. I remarked that it is easier when sawing a bit, than just pulling it true the glue (the line then snapped faster). I paid attention that I didn't lift the LCD with the fishing line. 4-5 times the line snapped and I had to start over, but it finally worked. I always had the dryer on but changed position sometimes that the whole thing won't heat up too much. Finally I was able to tear the LCD carefully off the shattered glass. The glass stayed compact so I think theres another film layer on it. Finally I tested the LCD and it worked fine. I couldn't see any flaws.

You can see an album of pictures here: http://imgur.com/a/L1Ya0

Now the next step is to clean off the glue... Have to find the right liquid...

btw. excuse my bad english but I was a bit excited and in a hurry...

Here's another video showing the same principle on a phone: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=96K8cr0id0Q

That was awesome!:good::good: For once I'm glad someone beat me to it. Congrats, you should be nominated Nexus Man of the Year. This would certainly encourage a lot of members with broken digitizers. One small favor to ask: is it at all possible for you to post a hi-res picture of the LCD's edge? I'd like to see how it was originally glued to the digitizer so as to find a way - hopefully safe - to remove the residual adhesive. A caution earlier that Goo-Gone might render the glass brittle bothers me. Depending on the kind, maybe we can use acetone instead. The speed at which it dries might prevent the chemicals from attacking the glass surface. Thank you much.:eek:

---------- Post added at 10:38 AM ---------- Previous post was at 10:36 AM ----------

A bit of epoxy may be the trick. Let us know if you follow through with the project and let us know the outcome!

There's your answer, my man.
 

DeGon

Senior Member
Mar 23, 2008
104
46
I'll post you these pictures tonight. The glue is all over the LCD module. I tried different liquids on the brocken glass digitizer, to see which one is best to remove the glue and I think pure alcohol, some heat and a razor blade could do the trick. I tried 36% cleansing alcohol and the glue came off already quite well. But cleansing alcohol has other stuff in it you don't wanna see on a LCD. So maybe pure alcohol will be better....

I am not sure of which material the top layer of the LCD is made. I don't think its glass. The only hint I have is from the manufacturers specification:

13.2 Cautions for handling the module
  • As the electrostatic discharges may break the LCD module, handle the LCD module with
    care. Peel a protection sheet off from the LCD panel surface as slowly as possible.
  • As the LCD panel and back - light element are made from fragile glass (epoxy) material,
    impulse and pressure to the LCD module should be avoided.
  • As the surface of the polarizer is very soft and easily scratched, use a soft dry cloth
    without chemicals for cleaning.
  • Do not pull the interface connector in or out while the LCD module is operating.
  • Put the module display side down on a flat horizontal plane.
  • Handle connectors and cables with care.

Could it be some kind of epoxy? Or is it acrylic?

I think in any case pure alcohol will be far less agressive than acetone. Rub alcohol into the glue with a paintbrush or an old toothbrush, wait a bit, heat a bit, rub some more alcohol on it and then take the razor blade in a flat angle and start carefully to scrape the softened glue away... I think that is what I am going to try.
 

lastot069

Senior Member
Feb 28, 2011
66
9
I'll post you these pictures tonight. The glue is all over the LCD module. I tried different liquids on the brocken glass digitizer, to see which one is best to remove the glue and I think pure alcohol, some heat and a razor blade could do the trick. I tried 36% cleansing alcohol and the glue came off already quite well. But cleansing alcohol has other stuff in it you don't wanna see on a LCD. So maybe pure alcohol will be better....

I am not sure of which material the top layer of the LCD is made. I don't think its glass. The only hint I have is from the manufacturers specification:



Could it be some kind of epoxy? Or is it acrylic?

I think in any case pure alcohol will be far less agressive than acetone. Rub alcohol into the glue with a paintbrush or an old toothbrush, wait a bit, heat a bit, rub some more alcohol on it and then take the razor blade in a flat angle and start carefully to scrape the softened glue away... I think that is what I am going to try.

the top is glass, thin glass. i used pure citrus spray and it dissolves it, but i would like it to be faster.
 

DeGon

Senior Member
Mar 23, 2008
104
46
...post a hi-res picture of the LCD's edge? I'd like to see how it was originally glued to the digitizer so as to find a way - hopefully safe - to remove the residual adhesive...

Here are the pictures in an album on imgur.

http://imgur.com/a/CWioq#0 (note that there is a way to see these pix in full res, just click on the little symbol on the top right corner)

IpVOtXZ.jpg


As you can see, the adhesive was not liquid glue (as I thought before), it was some kind of optical clear adhesive, a double-side glue tape that was applied to the LCD and the glass. On some pictures you can see that the tape does not cover the LC panel exactly to the edge. 1-2 mm of the LC panel are blank. (picture above)

N2JGWBK.jpg


On two sides of the LC Panel, the metal frame is a bit thicker (left and bottom edge), on the other two sides its just some milimeters (top and right edge), that will make it difficult to attach it on a new glass by only applying glue or adhesive tape at the edge of the LCD... I will see if I can do it without glueing it fully down... Maybe Sugru comes for the help...

As I said I tried to remove the tape from the broken glass digitizer. Cleaning alcohol (38% Ethanol and distilled water) already made it relatively easy to remove the adhesive with a razor blade. I think if the LC panel is really sealed by glass or even by an acrylic material, pure alcohol should do the trick, combined with a little pre-heating and a bit time to let the alcohol and glue react.I'd just aply the alcohol with a peintbrush or similar. I will get pure alcohol during the next days and then give it a try... will let you know my results...

---------- Post added at 10:26 PM ---------- Previous post was at 10:17 PM ----------

the top is glass, thin glass. i used pure citrus spray and it dissolves it, but i would like it to be faster.

What kind of spray is that? Brand? What are the ingredients?
 
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DeGon

Senior Member
Mar 23, 2008
104
46
Hmm. I am really not sure about using alcohol. It could damage the LC Panel if it is not glass, but epoxy or something.

Most people seem to use some kind of citrus cleaner. Like the guy who uses Orange Glo. 3M has some kind of glue remover, that contains Lemonene.

Limonene is used as a solvent in degreasing metals prior to industrial painting, for cleaning in the electronic and printing industries, and in paint as a solvent. Limonene is also used as a flavour and fragrance additive in food, house- hold cleaning products, and perfumes.

Also other companies offer glue removers with that stuff. It seems to be pretty harmless to a variety of materials....
 
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    Today my broken Nexus 7 16GB I picked up for 45$ arrived. i couldn't wait to try separating the LCD from the digitizer.

    Tatttatataaa! Success! I just completed steps 1-3 from my previous post.
    LCD and digitizer are separated now. At no additional cost, just around 90 minutes time and some things from my personal scrap yard.

    PbUZMr8.jpg

    Digitizer and LCD are separated. LCD is still working, but has still glue on it.

    This was my setup:

    - The disassembled screen unit (only digitizer and LCD)
    - A copper plate, bigger than the nexus clamped in a workbench (I had that one by accident, other metal or aluminium plates could work too)
    - Two metal bars and c-clamps to fix the glass (digitizer) onto the copper plate. The whole thing shouldn't move
    - A hair dryer with enough power to heat the coopper plate towards 50-70° C (That's what I think it was)
    - Fishing line (Extra strong black line, has some kind of structure, thats good for sawing)
    - two handles I could tye the fising line to, to have a good grip

    First I tied the fishing line to my handles (the red tool and the metal tool in one of the pictures). Then I warmed the whole thing for about 5 minutes looking for a good heat dissipation, not too hot on one spot but as equally hot as possible. I left the hair dryer blowing next to the copper plate so it would not cool down so fast. Then I took my handles and started sawing slowly and carefully by tearing the line trough the glue between LCD and digitizer. I remarked that it is easier when sawing a bit, than just pulling it true the glue (the line then snapped faster). I paid attention that I didn't lift the LCD with the fishing line. 4-5 times the line snapped and I had to start over, but it finally worked. I always had the dryer on but changed position sometimes that the whole thing won't heat up too much. Finally I was able to tear the LCD carefully off the shattered glass. The glass stayed compact so I think theres another film layer on it. Finally I tested the LCD and it worked fine. I couldn't see any flaws.

    You can see an album of pictures here: http://imgur.com/a/L1Ya0

    Now the next step is to clean off the glue... Have to find the right liquid...

    btw. excuse my bad english but I was a bit excited and in a hurry...

    Here's another video showing the same principle on a phone: http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=96K8cr0id0Q
    5
    Want to gain access to the internals of your Nexus 7? This repair guide will walk you through replacing a broken or damaged screen or any other internal components on your Nexus 7.

    This repair disassembly guide will help you to install the following Google Asus Nexus 7 parts:
    • Google Asus Nexus 7 LCD + Touch Screen Digitizer
    • Internal parts on the Nexus 7

    Tools Required:
    • Safe Open Pry Tool
    • Small Phillips Screwdriver
    • Adhesive Strips (For Touch Screen Replacements)
    • Hot Air Gun / Hair Dryer

    Google Asus Nexus 7 tablet Take apart guide:

    • Power off the device
    • Begin by using the safe open pry tool to separate the back cover from the device by sliding the pry tool which release the clips and the back cover should come right off

    nexus-7-repair-1.jpg

    Figure 1​
    • With the back cover removed, disconnect the battery by simply pulling out the connection with the safe open pry tool

    nexus-7-repair-2.jpg

    Figure 2​
    • You can now remove the battery using the safe open pry tool
    • Starting from the lower right side, slowly start pulling up the copper tape
    • Gently remove the black tape covering the LCD connection, Note- the metal shield may come off with the tape which is fine
    • Next you will need to release 5 connections located in this area, the 2 for the yellow ribbon (jaw connection) is for the USB and audio jack, the 2 jaw connections next to each other are for the touch screen digitizer and the single pop connection is for the LCD
    • On the top left (under the information sticker) you will need lift up and release the jaw connection holding in the volume button flex cable and then remove the cable which is held in place by adhesive
    • Using the small Phillips screwdriver you will need to remove 7 Phillips screws which are holding the motherboard in place

    nexus-7-repair-4.jpg

    Figure 3​
    • On the bottom remove 5 Phillips screws which are holding the audio jack and USB charging port

    nexus-7-repair-4.jpg

    Figure 4​
    • Around the perimeter there is 14 more screws that will need to be removed in order to remove the mid frame
    • Next remove the jumper flex cable by releasing the jaw connection

    nexus-7-repair-5.jpg

    Figure 5​
    • Now you will need to apply heat, use a hot hair dryer or heat gun for about 15 seconds on each side warming and loosening the adhesive
    • You can now separate the screen assembly from the frame of the front assembly
    • Simply replace the damaged parts with the new ones and reverse the order to put your tablet back together again.
    3
    Be careful about with Flex Ribbon Cable "ME370TG" "Rev 1.2"

    My glass screen replacement could not be without defects (wach my attached picture: "2013-09-23-3694.jpg (3 of 4)" ), three curved (wire) scratch and 1px black line the full length of the LCD screen.

    iTiS_EST

    I don't get much of what you're saying

    My english language is bad. But try to understand my story. I was Google Nexus 7 3G (32GB) ME370TG and beak LCD Screen Flex Ribbon Cable. I bought a new (eBay). But the new did not worked (only the backlights LEDs worked but the screen was black). Then I discovered the difference. Was written in the old/original/broken "ME370TG" and "Rev 1.2". Was written in the new what not working with my screen "ME370T" and "Rev 1.1". Then I discovered the next difference, which had two contacts/wire in flex ribbon cable (look at my pictures). The same cable (ME370TG rev 1.2) I have not found anywhere to sell/purchase. Only available for purchase ME370T rev 1.1. Then I make itself modification (see my previous posts) and then it worked.

    Morale: Be careful about with Flex Ribbon Cable "ME370TG" "Rev 1.2" fragile and easily breakable (no spares available).

    ... The problem i have is this:
    ... I boot up my N7, it starts to show the logo and all, it boots all the way up to the home screen, but the colors are 16-bit colors ...
    I want to boot up again and all I have now is a black screen flickering with that line in the middle. I don't see any boot logo, I don't see anything at all, ...
    Thanks
    I also had a similar way, until I discovered that it's broken cable (LCD-side Flex Ribbon Cable copper contacts are broken/fractured, after bending/flexion) (wach my attached picture: "2013-09-21-3607_.jpg (4 of 4)")
    ( I found one cable eBay [Item condition: for parts or not working]: ebay.com/itm/131001605357 )

    So I replaced and LCD/digitizer in a 32GB model and the digitizer still does not work with the new one i received. The screen looks great. Any ideas?
    maybe you have the same problem that I had, difference between the model ( ME370TG and ME370T or Rev 1.2 and Rev 1.1 )

    Google Nexus 7 avable four different model:
    1) Google Nexus 7 (2012 version) Wi-Fi (memory: 1GB, storage: 8GB or 16GB or 32 GB), LCD 1280x800 pixels (216 ppi) (model: ME370T)
    2) Google Nexus 7 (2012 version) Wi-Fi + Cellular (memory: 1GB, storage: 32 GB), LCD 1280x800 pixels (216 ppi) (model: ME370TG)
    3) Google Nexus 7 (2013 version) Wi-Fi (memory: 2GB, storage: 16GB or 32 GB), LCD 1920x1200 pixels (323 ppi) (model: ME571K)
    4) Google Nexus 7 (2013 version) Wi-Fi + Cellular (memory: 2GB, storage: 32 GB), LCD 1920x1200 pixels (323 ppi) (model: ME571KL)

    Google Nexus 7 ME370T 16GB (Codename: Asus Grouper) Wifi Model, ME370T: pdadb.net/index.php?m=specs&id=3641&c=google_nexus_7_me370t_16gb_asus_grouper
    Google Nexus 7C ME370TG 32GB (Codename: Asus Tilapia) Cellular Model, ME370TG: pdadb.net/index.php?m=specs&id=3968&c=google_nexus_7c_me370tg_32gb_asus_tilapia

    ... if my post was useful to you any kind of way, do not forget to click on the button: [:good: THANKS]
    2
    OK. Done. I assembled everything again.

    First I glued the glass to the bezel. Be sure to remove the protective film on the inner side of the digitizer. Of course you should avoid any pollution of the glass. Then I slipped the cleaned LCD in place. Also the LCD should be as clean as possible. Allignment of the LCD was not difficult, I just made sure, that the LCD has 1mm space to all sides of the bezel (there won't be more than 1mm). To make sure the LCD won't move, I pressed some Sugru in the space. That will fix the LCD at the right place and will be easy enough to remove. Then I reassembled everything.

    The result is quite good. My Nexus is fully useable, the touchscreen is as precise as eg. on my HTC One X+. But there are two little points that are not perfect:

    1. I have some traces and a few little dust speckles on the inner side of the glass I should have wiped away. During assembly, the digitizer glass fell from my table (I screamed in horror!) and it survived (!). But some dust particles sticked to it. I tried to wipe em away, but on the other side there was still a protective film wich had some traces too and I couldn't see if I cleaned it good enough. But this flaw I could correct, by opening it again (but as I only see these traces, when the screen is off, I am not in a hurry for opening the thing again.

    2. As the LCD is not glued to the glass now, there are points where the glass is tighly on the LCD and areas, where it's lifted just a nanometer or so. When the screen is off (and only then) I see the points, where the glass is flat and tight on the LCD. Theres like little rainbow artifact around these points. Sometimes I also see that by pressing certain points of the digitizer. But also this flaw is not so serious in my eyes, as I have the benefit to be able to remove the glass easily, next time it breaks.

    Would I recommend to fix a Nexus 7 this way (by separating the digitizer from the LCD)?

    Not unless you like doing such stuff or you just can't afford the LCD/digitizer combo.
    It takes a lot of time to separate the LCD from the glass, even more to clean it, and it also takes some time to glue it on the bezel (at least when you take thin double sided tape like I did). Even more serious is the fact, that many things can go wrong. You could destroy or damage the LCD, you could damage some electronic components (or these tiny clamps holding down the touchscreen cable connectors), you can smash the glass on assembly (or drop it from the table) and so on...

    Prices for the combo came down and will continue to do so, as Nexus 7.2 is on the horizon. So maybe it's better to grab one of these...

    Cost of my operation:
    - a Nexus 7 16GB with a broken glass (unfortunately in my case also a damaged LCD): 50$
    - a digitizer from aliexpress.com: 30$ incl. shipping
    - some air refresher containing lemonene from swiss retailer Migros: 5$
    - some double sided tape (3M 300LSE) from ebay: 5$ incl shipping
    - another original AND fully working LCD with shattered glass from ebay: 16$ incl shipping
    - a bit of Sugru (l already had that and and it could be replaced with glue or something)
    - around 8-12 hours work, even much more if you add up the time for reading and ordering stuff (and writing such long posts)

    Of course you could do that faster, if you do it often enough.

    Anyway, I just wanted to say: Yes, it is possible to just replace only the broken glass of an Asus Nexus 7...



    Sent from my repaired :thumbup: Nexus 7 using xda app-developers app :D
    2
    That's another thing I found. The specs of the LCD that is used in the Nexus 7 (or at least in most):

    HYDIS HV070WX2-1E0

    http://www.azdisplays.com/PDF/HV070WX2-1E0.pdf

    96UGLDI.jpg


    On one page there are reliability tests. There it is noted, that the LCD can stand 80°C in dry atmosphere. So that could be the first temperature to try to separate the LCD form the digitizer.