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[Repair guide] OnePlus One Full Disassembly/Screen Replacement + Re-assembly Tutorial

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vantt1

Senior Member
Dec 23, 2011
729
555
The pictures are quite big. Resize the browser window width to shrink the pictures to a more manageable size.

Disclaimer: Perform the following repairs at your own risk. This thread is for educational purposes only. You will void your warranty if you proceed. But that's implied, right?

Disassembly


Many of you will already know how troublesome sending a phone back to the manufacturer for repairs is. This is especially the case for OnePlus, whose after-sales support isn't exceptional, and compared to the price of the OPO itself, their repair costs are by no means affordable ($201 and an unknown amount of days). I've read that a number of forum members have repaired their screens themselves using parts from the internet, but it wasn't all that well documented. So as a mobile phone repairer by profession, I thought it would help a lot of people with broken screens for me to write up a detailed walkthrough/tutorial teaching them how to fix it themselves. Let's get to it!

New: a video! (credits to @stephenlotus)


Note that this guide can be used to replace any modular component; the StyleSwap cover, camera, charging port, you name it - just disassemble your phone until you reach your desired step, replace the faulty/damaged part, then re-assemble it!

Actually obtaining the replacement part? Well, that's another story :p

Equipment/Materials:

  • Precision screwdriver set (cross-head/Phillip's head, flat-head)
  • Sharp craft knife/Stanley knife
  • Plastic pry tools
  • Fine-tipped tweezers
  • Stainless steel pry tools
  • Thin, rigid cards/guitar picks
  • Hairdryer/industrial hot air gun (recommended)
  • Air blower (use this to clean the cameras and lenses before closing it up (not your breath))
  • A full screen assembly (not just the see-through glass digitizer)*
  • A roll (or a couple of different widths) of double-sided 3M repair tape or pre-cut 3M tape (see second post)

JX8qOHy.jpg


*The screen can be bought from various sellers on the internet starting from about $80 for the more repair-friendly version, depending on postage and stuff. Given the exclusive nature of the OnePlus One, any seller that sells a "Genuine/Original/OEM" screen assembly is 95% guaranteed to be an original screen. It isn't profitable for third party manufacturers to produce aftermarket replacements or re-manufacture working LCDs with broken glass (glass broken but LCD still works, remove broken glass and re-laminate a new one onto it). The market is small, because most people would still prefer to RMA their phones.

Also note that this guide assumes you will be re-using the old frame/chassis. If you plan to replace it too, then you will need to remove the earpiece grille (if the new screen doesn't have it) from the old screen, and it's best to move the foam lining from the old frame to the new frame too.

E1wtseg.jpg


I don't think I'm allowed to disclose sites that sell "original" OnePlus accessories/parts, so get Googling!

Actually, I can now. Mwahahahahaha!

You can buy the screen assembly from sites like eBay and AliExpress. I recommend getting the fully assembled screen, complete with capacitive key backlights:

vL36KaZ.jpg


www.aliexpress.com/item/for-Oneplus...zer-assembly-by-free-shipping/2022582516.html

The one without the button backlights is cheaper, but you'll have to take it from your old screen:

hP5LTFX.jpg

www.aliexpress.com/item/Free-Shippi...mbly-For-Oneplus-One-1-A0001/32245677673.html

Do not get the glass/digitizer only, unless you're up to the challenge, your LCD still works and you want the great savings:

HtOjtuJ.jpg


http://www.aliexpress.com/item/Orig...or-OnePlus-One-Free-shipping/32243992827.html

HKoEfve.jpg


Note: there's absolutely nothing wrong with my OnePlus One (well, except for very mild touchscreen issues). If I were to wait until I actually break it (which is never in a million years), I'd never get around to writing this tutorial. Your experience may vary, depending on severity of damage.

Step 1: Eject the SIM tray.

xuRFCqD.jpg


Step 2: Remove the StyleSwap cover. Using a plastic pry tool, start by lightly wedging it underneath the SIM slot (do not pry), and run it across the gap to release the clips. This ensures minimal/no damage to the battery and/or scratches to the StyleSwap cover, unlike using OnePlus' "Press and Peel" method. Never forget.

xj47y8F.jpg


Step 3: Using a knife with a sharp tip, remove the rubber screw caps covering the three screws in the middle of the camera lens cover.

2F1HQsC.jpg


Step 4: Unscrew all the screws, and put them in a safe place where you won't lose them.

Step 5: Using a plastic pry tool, pry off the camera cover from the corner near the power button or volume button. Caution! The battery flex may be stuck to the cover, so don't lift it up all the way. Detach it from the cover before fully removing it.

RqFzoEW.jpg


Step 6: Using the aforementioned method, do the same for the speaker assembly. Remove the rubber screw caps, unscrew all the screws and store in a safe place. Note how the screws covered with the caps are smaller.

Lafb4Zg.jpg


Step 7: Pry off the speaker assembly, starting from the USB port.

97RRHVR.jpg


Step 8: Use a plastic pry tool to detach the battery flex connector if it hasn't detached yet, then carefully wedge a stainless steel pry tool underneath the battery, starting at the bottom left corner. This side has less adhesive, so it's easier to start on this side. DO NOT PUSH DOWN INTO THE CHASSIS. Delicate flex cables reside here. Keep all pushing of the pry tool as horizontal as possible.

cJ0JHHy.jpg


Step 9: Once the left side of the battery has lifted enough, change directions of the pry tool. Use the left side of the chassis as a leverage point, and lift the battery out of the battery well. Be careful not to puncture or deform the battery. You can use a pry tool to cut the adhesive on the right side off the battery.

iGF17bg.jpg

TbW5zaA.jpg


Step 10: Unplug all the flex cable connectors off the logic board. There are 4 along the bottom edge and 1 to the left of the camera. DO NOT USE THE LOGIC BOARD AS A LEVERAGE POINT. There are delicate surface mount components on the logic board that can easily be damaged accidentally and are nearly impossible to replace. Hold down the logic board, and pull the flex connector up and away from the board.

Alternatively, if you want to cut to the chase and just replace the screen without removing all that other stuff, you can, by only disconnecting the LCD and digitizer flex (rightmost flex along the bottom and the wide flex in the top left corner respectively) and skipping to Step 19. Just remember to remove the plastic block in Step 16 and also be careful not to overheat the earpiece area.

TYNVYo1.jpg


Step 11: Unscrew the screw holding down the logic board. It is located next to the power button. Do not lose it for mix it up with the other screws. It is different in every dimension.

GHih5hp.jpg


Step 12: Using a sharp knife, peel the button flexes off the chassis, making sure the bottom edge comes off first and be careful not to cut the flex.

T9CvUJQ.jpg


Step 13: Push the digitizer flex away from the logic board so it doesn't get caught, and lift the logic board up from the chassis in an arc motion, starting from the top left corner. Rotate it clockwise while doing so.

d9fv77c.jpg


Step 14: There is still one connector still connected to the logic board on the underside, and that's the cellular antenna connector. Pull the antenna slightly out of its groove.

beArHh2.jpg


Step 15: Detach the antenna connector from the logic board using a plastic pry tool. You can use the logic board as the leverage point here, but make sure there aren't any delicate components nearby.

UaZIJWA.jpg


Step 16: Using a pair of fine-tipped tweezers, remove the plastic block that sits next to the digitizer flex connector.

aCtZ54H.jpg

iFixit's teardown does not cover this. If you don't remove it, the flex connector will be caught and will not come out.

Step 17: Carefully, using a flat-head screwdriver, remove the earpiece. This prevents the diaphragm from being damaged later on, when the hot air gun is used.

CAUTION: the earpiece's diaphragm and voice coil has the tendency to fall apart and separate itself from the rest of the earpiece. Be careful.

vLuLrkP.jpg


Step 18 (optional if doing a screen replacement, just don't damage them in the process): Peel the speaker/antenna/vibrate motor flex and USB port flex from the chassis, and remove them.

PgzIOFm.jpg


Step 19: Evenly heat the bezels of the screen using a hairdryer on high heat setting or a hot air gun on a med-high heat setting (~300 °C/~600 °F) on low airflow setting. This softens the adhesive holding the screen in place, making removal easier. Caution! The chassis can become very hot, as it is metal. Do not heat one area for a prolonged period of time, as it can permanently deform the plastic bezel surrounding the screen (or damage the LCD/digitizer, if it's a working one you intend to reuse).

eBWyrYz.jpg


This step I do not have exact instructions for, because my screen isn't broken. I had to be careful not to break it, as it was my only screen. You can use a knife to pry off broken pieces of glass.

WARNING: If you are removing a working intact display and intend to keep it that way, do NOT separate any of the LCD layers from the glass. As it is laminated, separating it will result in permanent damage to the display assembly.

I don't know what this copper does. It doesn't seem significant. New screen assemblies don't seem to have it. Also note that the screen is removed as a single piece assembly.

z4C7Rxp.jpg

TK8y0Xj.jpg


Step 20: Scrape off the copper bits and the old adhesive from the chassis using a tool of your choice, making sure to not damage anything else.

ZNBldzm.jpg

ImyGIIy.jpg


Step 21: Clean up your work area to prepare for re-assembly! Be careful of broken glass bits.

Obligatory exploded view pic:

4r6T4qJ.jpg

 
Last edited:

vantt1

Senior Member
Dec 23, 2011
729
555
Re-assembly


Now might be a good time to fix your grounding issues! If your touch issues arose from the increase of the device's temperature, you may have to cover the whole metallic back of the LCD with tape too.

Note: if the screen still has issues even when isolated as below, then the screen itself may be faulty.

To re-assemble it, it pretty much is just going through the steps in reverse order. When the phone is fully disassembled and nothing is adhered into place, now's the time to test your replacement screen assembly. You can do so by fitting the screen into the frame without using any adhesive, connect it to the logic board along with the battery and turn it on, or if you're lazy like me, just connect it up like this:

wZbPnrk.jpg


It is not recommended to keep the phone powered on for any longer than a few minutes like this, because the logic board effectively has no heatsink.

Step 1: As mentioned before, the old glue can no longer be reused, so we'll have to apply some adhesive tape, cut by hand. If this were a mainstream phone, it'd be pretty easy to get machine-cut 3M tape that fits the bezel perfectly, to ensure an optimal fit.

Jzul2SO.jpg

bhKP8Mi.jpg


Sadly, this isn't the case, so we'll have to resort to rolls of that tape of various widths. You can buy these from eBay by searching "3M double sided repair tape".

rGuI4Da.jpg


Update: pre-cut tape is now an option! You can get it on AliExpress .

EnCtR6c.jpg


I personally used 1 mm for the side bezels and 3 mm for the top and bottom, but experiment to obtain maximum coverage. Make sure you don't cover any sensor holes. Usually, this tape in roll form isn't adequately thick, so double up and use two layers.

m0PkvXA.jpg


IMPORTANT: Check that there aren't remnants of broken glass on the bezel when you install the screen or tape. They can cause the screen to easily break.

Also check that you've moved the earpiece grille and capacitive key backlight pads (if the new screen doesn't have them) over from the old screen to the new one. And if you really want to, move the foam ring surrounding the front camera hole in the glass to. It prevents light from the LCD's backlight from leaking into view.

fXIl60N.jpg


Step 2: Thread the flexes through their respective holes, and fit the screen into the chassis. Lightly heat the bezels (not too much; you don't want to damage the new LCD) to soften the adhesive, and place the screen face down on a clean, flat surface. Push down on the chassis with moderate force.

M0uHeH1.jpg


Step 3: Replace the rubber plastic block that sits in the digitizer flex slot.

MjV1YsB.jpg


Step 4: Make sure the proximity sensor, light sensor and front camera holes are clean and aren't covered by tape.

lOIa5n2.jpg


Step 5: If they were removed during the disassembly, replace the speaker/antenna/vibrate motor flex, then the USB port flex. Watch out for that weird bit that sticks out on the left ide of the speaker flex. Don't forget to reconnect the cellular antenna down the bottom.

4puapdt.jpg


Step 6: Put the earpiece back into the chassis. It should be oriented such that the two contact points are next to the digitizer flex.

5pfkiUW.jpg


Step 7: Reconnect the cellular antenna at the logic board. Do not push hardly unless you're absolutely sure it's aligned correctly.

75cPfam.jpg


Step 8: Tuck the antenna back into its groove.

BcBCqRv.jpg


Step 9: When reseating the logic board, ensure that the flex connectors stay clear from it. You don't want to have them end up underneath the logic board. Check that the board is flush with the screw holes.

kTQGVdo.jpg


Step 10: Make sure the front camera is also sitting flush. If it isn't, the camera cover may not fit, and the front camera will not be centered.

xAKt6uR.jpg

ZOXQzX0.jpg


Step 11: Reconnect all the flex cables, and replace the logic board screw.

xjNFXNX.jpg


Step 12: Stick the button flexes back down onto the chassis.

XfU3O5l.jpg


Step 13: Straighten all the flex cables by lifting them up and stretching them towards the logic board, the stick them back down.

cCp13gS.jpg


Step 14: Put the battery back in, then reconnect the flex.
Step 15: Replace the camera cover and screw it back into place.

8CQd8cl.jpg


Step 15b: Replace the tamper seal/water damage indicator (you won't get warranty either way, but might as well)

wg157ZZ.jpg


Step 16: Put the speaker assembly back in, and screw it into place.
Step 17: Replace all the rubber screw caps.

4pP07bz.jpg


Step 18: Replace the StyleSwap cover, and put the SIM tray (with card) back in. Although the tray fits either way (like in Sony's Xperia Z series phones), the side with the gold contacts should face up when the phone faces down. Inserting it upside down will result in the phone not reading the SIM card, and risk damage to the internal SIM reader. LG, HTC and Apple's phones' SIM trays are designed to only fit one-way.

KErKhFX.jpg


Step 19: Turn the phone on, and enjoy the results of your efforts!

2mfuVdF.jpg

 
Last edited:

naithantu

New member
Aug 22, 2012
2
0
26
How difficult is this repair for someone who has no experience repairing phones?
I broke my screen 2 days ago and I'm wondering if it's worth trying to repair it, this guide seems pretty solid but some steps look like you might easily break the phone entirely.
 

Heisenberg

Retired Forum Moderator
Jun 29, 2011
27,184
18,630
Knocking on your door
OnePlus 9 Pro
How difficult is this repair for someone who has no experience repairing phones?
I broke my screen 2 days ago and I'm wondering if it's worth trying to repair it, this guide seems pretty solid but some steps look like you might easily break the phone entirely.
If you have no experience it'll probably be pretty difficult for you, unless you have a good technical/mechanical mind.
 

CyberActive

Member
Apr 12, 2008
13
0
Query :)

Excellent guide and I have all the bits removed from the old frame.

I thought I would be an easier route to use a brand new frame, instead of trying to heat the old LCD off.

I have tested everything on the bench and it powers up and we have touch screen :)

But I have now stopped the reassembly to check the following out. The new frame although having the required sticky parts does not have the black parts, which I assume is insulation.

Do I need this? what can I replace it with, is insulation tape ok although slightly thicker or maybe thin scotch magic tape? The guide mentions a good time to fix the touch screen issues, in the 4 days I had it prior to the drop, I don't think I had an issues, but does this need to be done, and am I right in reading that's also just cover the metal of the screen with insulation tape or scotch magic tape again?

I have attached an image of the black tape I refer to on the frame

Thanks,
Stephen.
 

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vantt1

Senior Member
Dec 23, 2011
729
555
Query :)

Excellent guide and I have all the bits removed from the old frame.

I thought I would be an easier route to use a brand new frame, instead of trying to heat the old LCD off.

I have tested everything on the bench and it powers up and we have touch screen :)

But I have now stopped the reassembly to check the following out. The new frame although having the required sticky parts does not have the black parts, which I assume is insulation.

Do I need this? what can I replace it with, is insulation tape ok although slightly thicker or maybe thin scotch magic tape? The guide mentions a good time to fix the touch screen issues, in the 4 days I had it prior to the drop, I don't think I had an issues, but does this need to be done, and am I right in reading that's also just cover the metal of the screen with insulation tape or scotch magic tape again?

I have attached an image of the black tape I refer to on the frame

Thanks,
Stephen.
If it was originally in the phone, it's always a good idea to replace it, or use a substitute in place of it. I don't know how it'll affect the phone's functionality if it isn't replaced, because I've never tried it. It's best to play it safe and tape up those corresponding areas with electrical tape. Scotch tape may be too thin.

Dang, 4 days??

Also, does your replacement screen have the earpiece grille pre-installed? When I disassembled mine, the earpiece was not part of the frame, but stuck to the screen.
 

CyberActive

Member
Apr 12, 2008
13
0
If it was originally in the phone, it's always a good idea to replace it, or use a substitute in place of it. I don't know how it'll affect the phone's functionality if it isn't replaced, because I've never tried it. It's best to play it safe and tape up those corresponding areas with electrical tape. Scotch tape may be too thin.

Dang, 4 days??

Also, does your replacement screen have the earpiece grille pre-installed? When I disassembled mine, the earpiece was not part of the frame, but stuck to the screen.

Ok making some progress :)

Turns out the black that's under the flat connectors is there on the replacement frame, just a different colour.

I am starting to think that the black that's under the main board could be some sort of heat sink tape? I am referring the black that's actually stuck to the logic board on the top and also on the frame below the logic board and linked to the rear facing camera.

I have tried to remove the old screen with a hair dryer but have failed miserably. So I can not see for myself what the black under the screen was like can you remember if it was like what I believe to be heat sink tape or was it just adhesive or insulation?

Thanks for the heads up about the speaker grill, that is attached to the old screen, I managed to break that out as that's where the screen was smashed.

I have also noticed there is some conductive tape that bridges the frame and back of the screen together, that's not on the replacement parts.

There is also an adhesive o ring stuck to the glass in the front facing camera slot that's not on there replacement part.

Hopefully will get it rebuilt soon :)

Thanks Stephen
 

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vantt1

Senior Member
Dec 23, 2011
729
555
Ok making some progress :)

Turns out the black that's under the flat connectors is there on the replacement frame, just a different colour.

I am starting to think that the black that's under the main board could be some sort of heat sink tape? I am referring the black that's actually stuck to the logic board on the top and also on the frame below the logic board and linked to the rear facing camera.

I have tried to remove the old screen with a hair dryer but have failed miserably. So I can not see for myself what the black under the screen was like can you remember if it was like what I believe to be heat sink tape or was it just adhesive or insulation?

Thanks for the heads up about the speaker grill, that is attached to the old screen, I managed to break that out as that's where the screen was smashed.

I have also noticed there is some conductive tape that bridges the frame and back of the screen together, that's not on the replacement parts.

There is also an adhesive o ring stuck to the glass in the front facing camera slot that's not on there replacement part.

Hopefully will get it rebuilt soon :)

Thanks Stephen
Yeah, that tape is very similar to the type that's found on the inside of the iPhone 5's midframe. Apparently it's a "heat dissipation shield" film. You can probably buy it on eBay then trim it to the same shape as the original.

000324-1.jpg


I don't know what that copper stuff that bridges the LCD to the frame is. I scraped off the bridging bits, and nothing seems off on my end.

Replace that O ring if you can. If you use the front camera, the backlight from the LCD might leak into view. I know it does on the Nexus 5.
 
Last edited:

CyberActive

Member
Apr 12, 2008
13
0

vantt1

Senior Member
Dec 23, 2011
729
555
Great stuff, slowly getting there, I will get that orderderd and cut to size, these are what I am looking at:

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/iPhone-4-...K_Replacement_Parts_Tools&hash=item418dc2333a

and / or

http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/1x-iPhone...nk-dissipation-adhesive-sticker-/171636569146

Was it this same stuff that was on the frame surface behind the LCD? or was that just insulation?

Also you mentioned the touch screen fix, what is involved in that?

Thanks Stephen.
The stuff behind the LCD is more of a foam tape/film than a graphite tape. It feels similar to the one found behind the Nexus 5's LCD, but darker and smoother. And of course, the Nexus 5's isn't big enough.

oObWecS.jpg


The touchscreen fix involves putting tape on the chassis underneath the digitizer flex. If the issue was heat related, the metallic back of the LCD may need to be taped up too (apparently along the perimeter, creating a rectangle).

ECxIDXS.jpg


See above picture, circled in red: it looks like there's some heat dissipation tape underneath the LCD too.
 
Last edited:

CyberActive

Member
Apr 12, 2008
13
0
Ah ok, any suggestions on what I could replace the stuff behind the LCD with then? I have searched for the nexus 5 stuff and I can no locate any of that either.

Thanks,

Stephen.
 

vantt1

Senior Member
Dec 23, 2011
729
555
Ah ok, any suggestions on what I could replace the stuff behind the LCD with then? I have searched for the nexus 5 stuff and I can no locate any of that either.

Thanks,

Stephen.
At the moment the best way to obtain it would probably be to take it out of your old frame. It's really hard to find OnePlus One specific parts these days.
 

CyberActive

Member
Apr 12, 2008
13
0
guess I will have to go buy a heat gun over the next few days as I tried using a hair dryer and was not able to get even a little bit of movement on lifting the lcd from the frame.

I will post back over the new few days how it goes. fingers crossed.
 

bewA

Senior Member
Feb 16, 2010
489
7
I followed this guide and it was perfect!
The only downside is that when heating the screen i've managed seperate the plastic bezel from the screen it's self which is now out of shape as well. I'm hoping if i just heat it back up a little I can reform it back.
Just waiting on delivery of some repair tape.
 

T-uzun

Member
May 28, 2014
39
1
31
Bremen
hi guys i just send my one to repair for over 150€ because i thought it could only be changed as a wholle.. screen functions online half of the screen touchscreen doesnt work becuase of a small crack on the side.....SO DO I NEED JUST A NEW TOUCH DIGITIZER??? is this also with the corning glass on top?? mits not right??
 
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Technecium

Senior Member
Oct 6, 2007
1,570
716
Finally got everything I needed to go ahead with the screen replacement. This teardown was extremely helpful. I did have one snag and I haven't tested yet. When removing the earpiece it disassembled into two pieces and unwound but I gingerly repositioned the copper thread and left the earpiece in during the heating and old screen removal.
The new screen is outstanding and completely changes the experience of using the One Plus One. I only wish they had done better quality control in the first place.
 

marty331

Senior Member
Jun 29, 2011
829
248
Dallas, TX
Thanks for this guide. I'm going to order a new screen/digitizer today. I guess in about a month I'll be attempting this. When I broke my OnePlus I ordered a new one that day, so I plan on selling the second one if this repair is successful. If it's not, then I guess I lose $70 and some time. Wish me luck!
 

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    The pictures are quite big. Resize the browser window width to shrink the pictures to a more manageable size.

    Disclaimer: Perform the following repairs at your own risk. This thread is for educational purposes only. You will void your warranty if you proceed. But that's implied, right?

    Disassembly


    Many of you will already know how troublesome sending a phone back to the manufacturer for repairs is. This is especially the case for OnePlus, whose after-sales support isn't exceptional, and compared to the price of the OPO itself, their repair costs are by no means affordable ($201 and an unknown amount of days). I've read that a number of forum members have repaired their screens themselves using parts from the internet, but it wasn't all that well documented. So as a mobile phone repairer by profession, I thought it would help a lot of people with broken screens for me to write up a detailed walkthrough/tutorial teaching them how to fix it themselves. Let's get to it!

    New: a video! (credits to @stephenlotus)


    Note that this guide can be used to replace any modular component; the StyleSwap cover, camera, charging port, you name it - just disassemble your phone until you reach your desired step, replace the faulty/damaged part, then re-assemble it!

    Actually obtaining the replacement part? Well, that's another story :p

    Equipment/Materials:

    • Precision screwdriver set (cross-head/Phillip's head, flat-head)
    • Sharp craft knife/Stanley knife
    • Plastic pry tools
    • Fine-tipped tweezers
    • Stainless steel pry tools
    • Thin, rigid cards/guitar picks
    • Hairdryer/industrial hot air gun (recommended)
    • Air blower (use this to clean the cameras and lenses before closing it up (not your breath))
    • A full screen assembly (not just the see-through glass digitizer)*
    • A roll (or a couple of different widths) of double-sided 3M repair tape or pre-cut 3M tape (see second post)

    JX8qOHy.jpg


    *The screen can be bought from various sellers on the internet starting from about $80 for the more repair-friendly version, depending on postage and stuff. Given the exclusive nature of the OnePlus One, any seller that sells a "Genuine/Original/OEM" screen assembly is 95% guaranteed to be an original screen. It isn't profitable for third party manufacturers to produce aftermarket replacements or re-manufacture working LCDs with broken glass (glass broken but LCD still works, remove broken glass and re-laminate a new one onto it). The market is small, because most people would still prefer to RMA their phones.

    Also note that this guide assumes you will be re-using the old frame/chassis. If you plan to replace it too, then you will need to remove the earpiece grille (if the new screen doesn't have it) from the old screen, and it's best to move the foam lining from the old frame to the new frame too.

    E1wtseg.jpg


    I don't think I'm allowed to disclose sites that sell "original" OnePlus accessories/parts, so get Googling!

    Actually, I can now. Mwahahahahaha!

    You can buy the screen assembly from sites like eBay and AliExpress. I recommend getting the fully assembled screen, complete with capacitive key backlights:

    vL36KaZ.jpg


    www.aliexpress.com/item/for-Oneplus...zer-assembly-by-free-shipping/2022582516.html

    The one without the button backlights is cheaper, but you'll have to take it from your old screen:

    hP5LTFX.jpg

    www.aliexpress.com/item/Free-Shippi...mbly-For-Oneplus-One-1-A0001/32245677673.html

    Do not get the glass/digitizer only, unless you're up to the challenge, your LCD still works and you want the great savings:

    HtOjtuJ.jpg


    http://www.aliexpress.com/item/Orig...or-OnePlus-One-Free-shipping/32243992827.html

    HKoEfve.jpg


    Note: there's absolutely nothing wrong with my OnePlus One (well, except for very mild touchscreen issues). If I were to wait until I actually break it (which is never in a million years), I'd never get around to writing this tutorial. Your experience may vary, depending on severity of damage.

    Step 1: Eject the SIM tray.

    xuRFCqD.jpg


    Step 2: Remove the StyleSwap cover. Using a plastic pry tool, start by lightly wedging it underneath the SIM slot (do not pry), and run it across the gap to release the clips. This ensures minimal/no damage to the battery and/or scratches to the StyleSwap cover, unlike using OnePlus' "Press and Peel" method. Never forget.

    xj47y8F.jpg


    Step 3: Using a knife with a sharp tip, remove the rubber screw caps covering the three screws in the middle of the camera lens cover.

    2F1HQsC.jpg


    Step 4: Unscrew all the screws, and put them in a safe place where you won't lose them.

    Step 5: Using a plastic pry tool, pry off the camera cover from the corner near the power button or volume button. Caution! The battery flex may be stuck to the cover, so don't lift it up all the way. Detach it from the cover before fully removing it.

    RqFzoEW.jpg


    Step 6: Using the aforementioned method, do the same for the speaker assembly. Remove the rubber screw caps, unscrew all the screws and store in a safe place. Note how the screws covered with the caps are smaller.

    Lafb4Zg.jpg


    Step 7: Pry off the speaker assembly, starting from the USB port.

    97RRHVR.jpg


    Step 8: Use a plastic pry tool to detach the battery flex connector if it hasn't detached yet, then carefully wedge a stainless steel pry tool underneath the battery, starting at the bottom left corner. This side has less adhesive, so it's easier to start on this side. DO NOT PUSH DOWN INTO THE CHASSIS. Delicate flex cables reside here. Keep all pushing of the pry tool as horizontal as possible.

    cJ0JHHy.jpg


    Step 9: Once the left side of the battery has lifted enough, change directions of the pry tool. Use the left side of the chassis as a leverage point, and lift the battery out of the battery well. Be careful not to puncture or deform the battery. You can use a pry tool to cut the adhesive on the right side off the battery.

    iGF17bg.jpg

    TbW5zaA.jpg


    Step 10: Unplug all the flex cable connectors off the logic board. There are 4 along the bottom edge and 1 to the left of the camera. DO NOT USE THE LOGIC BOARD AS A LEVERAGE POINT. There are delicate surface mount components on the logic board that can easily be damaged accidentally and are nearly impossible to replace. Hold down the logic board, and pull the flex connector up and away from the board.

    Alternatively, if you want to cut to the chase and just replace the screen without removing all that other stuff, you can, by only disconnecting the LCD and digitizer flex (rightmost flex along the bottom and the wide flex in the top left corner respectively) and skipping to Step 19. Just remember to remove the plastic block in Step 16 and also be careful not to overheat the earpiece area.

    TYNVYo1.jpg


    Step 11: Unscrew the screw holding down the logic board. It is located next to the power button. Do not lose it for mix it up with the other screws. It is different in every dimension.

    GHih5hp.jpg


    Step 12: Using a sharp knife, peel the button flexes off the chassis, making sure the bottom edge comes off first and be careful not to cut the flex.

    T9CvUJQ.jpg


    Step 13: Push the digitizer flex away from the logic board so it doesn't get caught, and lift the logic board up from the chassis in an arc motion, starting from the top left corner. Rotate it clockwise while doing so.

    d9fv77c.jpg


    Step 14: There is still one connector still connected to the logic board on the underside, and that's the cellular antenna connector. Pull the antenna slightly out of its groove.

    beArHh2.jpg


    Step 15: Detach the antenna connector from the logic board using a plastic pry tool. You can use the logic board as the leverage point here, but make sure there aren't any delicate components nearby.

    UaZIJWA.jpg


    Step 16: Using a pair of fine-tipped tweezers, remove the plastic block that sits next to the digitizer flex connector.

    aCtZ54H.jpg

    iFixit's teardown does not cover this. If you don't remove it, the flex connector will be caught and will not come out.

    Step 17: Carefully, using a flat-head screwdriver, remove the earpiece. This prevents the diaphragm from being damaged later on, when the hot air gun is used.

    CAUTION: the earpiece's diaphragm and voice coil has the tendency to fall apart and separate itself from the rest of the earpiece. Be careful.

    vLuLrkP.jpg


    Step 18 (optional if doing a screen replacement, just don't damage them in the process): Peel the speaker/antenna/vibrate motor flex and USB port flex from the chassis, and remove them.

    PgzIOFm.jpg


    Step 19: Evenly heat the bezels of the screen using a hairdryer on high heat setting or a hot air gun on a med-high heat setting (~300 °C/~600 °F) on low airflow setting. This softens the adhesive holding the screen in place, making removal easier. Caution! The chassis can become very hot, as it is metal. Do not heat one area for a prolonged period of time, as it can permanently deform the plastic bezel surrounding the screen (or damage the LCD/digitizer, if it's a working one you intend to reuse).

    eBWyrYz.jpg


    This step I do not have exact instructions for, because my screen isn't broken. I had to be careful not to break it, as it was my only screen. You can use a knife to pry off broken pieces of glass.

    WARNING: If you are removing a working intact display and intend to keep it that way, do NOT separate any of the LCD layers from the glass. As it is laminated, separating it will result in permanent damage to the display assembly.

    I don't know what this copper does. It doesn't seem significant. New screen assemblies don't seem to have it. Also note that the screen is removed as a single piece assembly.

    z4C7Rxp.jpg

    TK8y0Xj.jpg


    Step 20: Scrape off the copper bits and the old adhesive from the chassis using a tool of your choice, making sure to not damage anything else.

    ZNBldzm.jpg

    ImyGIIy.jpg


    Step 21: Clean up your work area to prepare for re-assembly! Be careful of broken glass bits.

    Obligatory exploded view pic:

    4r6T4qJ.jpg

    60
    Re-assembly


    Now might be a good time to fix your grounding issues! If your touch issues arose from the increase of the device's temperature, you may have to cover the whole metallic back of the LCD with tape too.

    Note: if the screen still has issues even when isolated as below, then the screen itself may be faulty.

    To re-assemble it, it pretty much is just going through the steps in reverse order. When the phone is fully disassembled and nothing is adhered into place, now's the time to test your replacement screen assembly. You can do so by fitting the screen into the frame without using any adhesive, connect it to the logic board along with the battery and turn it on, or if you're lazy like me, just connect it up like this:

    wZbPnrk.jpg


    It is not recommended to keep the phone powered on for any longer than a few minutes like this, because the logic board effectively has no heatsink.

    Step 1: As mentioned before, the old glue can no longer be reused, so we'll have to apply some adhesive tape, cut by hand. If this were a mainstream phone, it'd be pretty easy to get machine-cut 3M tape that fits the bezel perfectly, to ensure an optimal fit.

    Jzul2SO.jpg

    bhKP8Mi.jpg


    Sadly, this isn't the case, so we'll have to resort to rolls of that tape of various widths. You can buy these from eBay by searching "3M double sided repair tape".

    rGuI4Da.jpg


    Update: pre-cut tape is now an option! You can get it on AliExpress .

    EnCtR6c.jpg


    I personally used 1 mm for the side bezels and 3 mm for the top and bottom, but experiment to obtain maximum coverage. Make sure you don't cover any sensor holes. Usually, this tape in roll form isn't adequately thick, so double up and use two layers.

    m0PkvXA.jpg


    IMPORTANT: Check that there aren't remnants of broken glass on the bezel when you install the screen or tape. They can cause the screen to easily break.

    Also check that you've moved the earpiece grille and capacitive key backlight pads (if the new screen doesn't have them) over from the old screen to the new one. And if you really want to, move the foam ring surrounding the front camera hole in the glass to. It prevents light from the LCD's backlight from leaking into view.

    fXIl60N.jpg


    Step 2: Thread the flexes through their respective holes, and fit the screen into the chassis. Lightly heat the bezels (not too much; you don't want to damage the new LCD) to soften the adhesive, and place the screen face down on a clean, flat surface. Push down on the chassis with moderate force.

    M0uHeH1.jpg


    Step 3: Replace the rubber plastic block that sits in the digitizer flex slot.

    MjV1YsB.jpg


    Step 4: Make sure the proximity sensor, light sensor and front camera holes are clean and aren't covered by tape.

    lOIa5n2.jpg


    Step 5: If they were removed during the disassembly, replace the speaker/antenna/vibrate motor flex, then the USB port flex. Watch out for that weird bit that sticks out on the left ide of the speaker flex. Don't forget to reconnect the cellular antenna down the bottom.

    4puapdt.jpg


    Step 6: Put the earpiece back into the chassis. It should be oriented such that the two contact points are next to the digitizer flex.

    5pfkiUW.jpg


    Step 7: Reconnect the cellular antenna at the logic board. Do not push hardly unless you're absolutely sure it's aligned correctly.

    75cPfam.jpg


    Step 8: Tuck the antenna back into its groove.

    BcBCqRv.jpg


    Step 9: When reseating the logic board, ensure that the flex connectors stay clear from it. You don't want to have them end up underneath the logic board. Check that the board is flush with the screw holes.

    kTQGVdo.jpg


    Step 10: Make sure the front camera is also sitting flush. If it isn't, the camera cover may not fit, and the front camera will not be centered.

    xAKt6uR.jpg

    ZOXQzX0.jpg


    Step 11: Reconnect all the flex cables, and replace the logic board screw.

    xjNFXNX.jpg


    Step 12: Stick the button flexes back down onto the chassis.

    XfU3O5l.jpg


    Step 13: Straighten all the flex cables by lifting them up and stretching them towards the logic board, the stick them back down.

    cCp13gS.jpg


    Step 14: Put the battery back in, then reconnect the flex.
    Step 15: Replace the camera cover and screw it back into place.

    8CQd8cl.jpg


    Step 15b: Replace the tamper seal/water damage indicator (you won't get warranty either way, but might as well)

    wg157ZZ.jpg


    Step 16: Put the speaker assembly back in, and screw it into place.
    Step 17: Replace all the rubber screw caps.

    4pP07bz.jpg


    Step 18: Replace the StyleSwap cover, and put the SIM tray (with card) back in. Although the tray fits either way (like in Sony's Xperia Z series phones), the side with the gold contacts should face up when the phone faces down. Inserting it upside down will result in the phone not reading the SIM card, and risk damage to the internal SIM reader. LG, HTC and Apple's phones' SIM trays are designed to only fit one-way.

    KErKhFX.jpg


    Step 19: Turn the phone on, and enjoy the results of your efforts!

    2mfuVdF.jpg

    4
    Added to OnePlus One index thread:

    [INDEX] OnePlus One Resources Compilation Roll-Up

    Transmitted via Bacon
    2
    Hello guys,

    First of all i would like to thank the writer and the video maker for the amazing guide. I followed the guide step by step and everything looked find with just one problem and I even dont know if it is related to replacement or not. when i open camera app the option to swap back and front camera is no where to be seem. I have checked everything but cant find the solution to it.

    Any help would be much appreciated.
    Thanks in advance
    You must have disconnected the front camera cables when you reassembled. This has happened to me too so I dis-assembled again, snap the front camera cable and reassembled again.
    2
    Great job on separating the glass from the LCD! What do you mean by the backlight, and why do you need to replace it?

    Behind the LCD there's a light box that shines up so you can see the display. Without it the screen would be completely black and unreadable.
    In the process of Using UV glue to adhere the glass to the lcd 99% of the time a little spills over the side and seeps into the backlight causing it to fade.
    I could have taken the backlight off but there's always a chance that you wont get all the backlight to come off in one piece.
    So you just put a new backlight on and your good to go.