[Review] S7 Edge Cases: UAG, Spigen, Incipio, Tech 21, Otterbox, Ringke & more!

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Pilz

Senior Member
Dec 1, 2013
7,253
2,596
Texas

Diztronic Voyeur:
Over the years I’ve become quite a fan of Diztronics cases for several reasons. The simplicity of their design is refreshing compared to some other cases that appear to overdo certain things. The Voyeur case is a hybrid case featuring a TPU bumper alongside a clear polycarbonate back that has a scratch resistant coating on it. Along the backside of the case you will find four tiny feet (1 in each corner) which act as a means to keep the clear back off any surface which should prolong it’s life along with the scratch resistant coating. As per Diztronics usual set up, the TPU is very nicer (nicer than Spigen’s) and has a matte look to it. I really enjoy the look of this case overall, but first I want to mention some minor issues. First and foremost, I haven’t found a screen protector that will in fact work with this case. So far I’ve tried the newly redesigned Spigen film which arguable covers the least possible area on the front while still covering the edge. It lifted the edges on it immediately no matter how I placed the phone in. Next, I tried the VZW plastic ones which are also case friendly just like the Spigen ones are. This was also a failure, since the screen protector started to lift and wouldn’t go back down. (for the pictures I had to be extremely careful with the screen protector, and I had to constantly push it back down between each one I took). If you don’t use a screen protector, then this shouldn’t matter because the case is great. The last small issue is concerning the clear back; it is unfortunately subject to the same ‘watermarking’ aka rainbow effect when you apply pressure to it. I spoke with Diztronic about this, and they stated it should go away for the most part (at least the constant ‘stuck’ area, but the overall ‘watermarking’ will still occur when you apply pressure). If you’re using a skin on the S7 Edge this will be a non-issue for you.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

Volume/Power buttons: Diztronic is well known for their excellent buttons, and this case upholds that standard. The buttons are all great, tactile, and genuinely feel nice to use!
Overall:9/10 Despite the small ‘watermarking’ issue (which might get fixed if the case is revised), and the inability to use a screen protector so far the case is in my top 5 favorites. Not everyone uses a screen protector, so I didn’t let that count against its overall rating. Diztronic overall made a nice simple yet different styled case that is something anyone could appreciate.


Diztronic Voyeur:




Disclaimer: I was sent these cases from EasyACC in exchange for a fair and unbiased review.

EasyACC TPU Clear Case:
First let me start by saying this might be the thinnest case I’ve used yet with some catches. The case is similar to the other two extremely thin TPU cases that I recently review including the Spigen Liquid Crystal, and the Ringke Fusion Air. On the underside of the back you will find the same dot matrix pattern which helps prevent watermarking from occurring. (Watermarking is when the case sticks to the phone causing a rainbow like effect) Since the case is so thin, it doesn’t grip on the sides of the phone; the only parts holding your phone in the case are its four corners that wrap around the face of your S7 Edge. I’ve found this to cause some issues which I will go into further detail on. The volume buttons are the only thing on that side keeping the TPU from uncovering your edge, but when you look at the opposite side with the power button things start to change. The power button area of the case has a side ‘missing’ to it which essentially means it won’t hold the side of the TPU like it should. As I mentioned there is nothing preventing the sides of the case from pulling away when you hold the phone aside from where it encloses the buttons. Since the power button isn’t enclosed that whole side of the case pulls away from the phone as you hold it. The case won’t come off despite this because the four corners holding it to the phone wrap around enough to prevent that, but it's not exactly comforting to have one side of the case physically pop off while using it.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

Volume/Power buttons: All of the buttons function well, and are tactile as you should expect from any slim case made from a TPU. There is a big issue with the power button section not fully wrapping around it which causes the side of the case to move outward as you use the phone.

Overall: 5/10 There is a lot to like about cases like this particular thin one from EasyACC, but the rather alarming issue (design or quality control related) is enough to prevent me from putting my phone in it again.

EasyACC TPU Clear Case:




EasyACC Protective Armor Case:
EasyACC was kind enough to provide another case for me to review, but this time it’s a 2-layer hybrid as opposed to a thin TPU one. This case is nearly identical in terms of styling, function and feel to one my wife uses on her Nexus 6P that she really enjoys. It included 2 different colored back ‘plastic’ panels that can be interchanged depending on what your personal taste is on any given day. My particular case included both a black, and mint back alongside the inner TPU. Each of the back panels is subtly textured giving them a nice feel, but not necessarily what I would call any real grip over a conventional TPU case like my Spigen Rugged Armor. I have no issues with the cases fit at with either of the two included back panels. This case does have a rather large camera cutout that seems over the top to me, but it might be more appealing to other people. I personally prefer to have as much of the back glass covered and protected since I am prone to dropping my phone. The larger cutout does not affect any function of the phone, but is a personal preference of mine to have a smaller one.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

Volume/Power buttons: The buttons float freely inside of the inner TPU shell allowing for a pleasant, but sometimes sensitive button pushing experience. I did notice how the buttons can be hit accidentally due to how much they stick out from the TPU, and how sensitive they are. This isn’t a huge deal to me, but it might me for people that keep their phone in a bag where it could be accidentally turned on.

Overall: 7/10 I think this is a decent offering in the two-piece hybrid case area due to its included spare shell, and overall good feel. There are some areas that could use improvement such as the button protrusion and large camera cutout, but overall I didn’t find any big issues with this case.

EasyACC Protective Armor Case:







Evutec Karbon SI Lite:
I was very interested to see an hybrid case that used real carbon fiber given it’s durability. The case itself is very thin, and almost has a fake silicon coated feeling to the TPU bumper. I’m still rather neutral on how the TPU feels, but along the backside is where things get interesting, There’s a carbon fiber insert that adds durability (I would at least hope it does) with an extremely smooth finish to it. My case arrived with a small defect in the carbon fiber where it borders the TPU (looks like the coating is peeling away, I will take more pictures of that area). This should not hinder the cases durability, but it does detract from the look of the back panel since it cannot be unseen. On the bottom of the carbon fiber there is a ‘tramp stamp’ with the company’s logo similar to the type of nonsense some service providers do that will not be named. The logo is under layers of a “scratch resistant” coating, so there’s no hope of it being removed at any point. The case feels very loose as another member mentioned around the middle of the edge, or frankly anywhere along the sides. I thought for a moment that my phone was going to pop out and suffer a K.O. by hitting the pavement when I pulled it out of my pocket earlier this evening.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

Volume/Power buttons: All of the buttons are great, making that the only good part about this case so far.

Overall: 7/10 Like many people, I love the look of carbon fiber, especially when it’s the real deal. This case threw away a lot of that appeal when it arrived with a defect, and didn’t hold my phone securely as any case should. I won’t sacrifice looks for protection here, so despite the effort, and tactile buttons I would avoid buying one of these.

Evutec Karbon SI Lite






Incipio Dual Pro Shine:

I’ve always been a fan of Incipio cases including the one I currently have on my Surface Pro 4 and Nexus 6P. The Dual Pro Shine for the S7E was a letdown. The case doesn’t have the same quality feel that all of my other Incipio cases do. When I put my S7E in the case the polycarbonate shell didn’t fully fit around the TPU insert which was concerning to me. It detracted from the overall appearance, and feel of the case. When I compared the TPU insert to my Nexus 6P’s Dual Pro it just felt stiff and cheap, so I’m not sure what Incipio was thinking when they released this version of the case. It almost feels like a hard plastic at times despite being a TPU. On the front side of the insert the border has a glossy finish which helps it blend in with your screen as a nice touch to an otherwise mediocre case. I enjoy the brushed metal back because it actually looks like brushed metal unlike some cases I’ve seen. It doesn’t have a texture to it, so you might be disappointed if you’re expecting some added grip from the back.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

Volume/Power buttons: The volume and power buttons on this case are very stiff which makes it hard know if you actually hit the buttons or not. The volume buttons are a little better than the power button, but still difficult to press in the end. I’ve noticed that sometimes the S7E will have issues with the power button’s tactile feel in a case if you don’t install it correctly, but I checked the feel with/without the PC shell. I also checked how responsive the buttons were based on the way I inserted the phone (one side first, top first etc) to no avail.

Overall: 7/10 The poor fitment of the polycarbonate shell coupled with the extra stiff buttons ruined an otherwise good case. If Incipio addresses these issues I would enjoy using it a lot more.

Incipio Dual Pro Shine





Incipio Dual Pro:
After the disaster that was the Dual Pro Shine, I decided to give Incipio another chance at redeeming itself. The Dual Pro (original) was the case I originally wanted because I have the same one for my Nexus 6P, and it’s great. Incipio kept the same soft feel coated polycarbonate outer shell which I appreciate. The only downside to the soft touch finish is that it shows marks easily (most of them will go away if you wipe them with a damp cloth). I don’t really mind if it shows marks or not since it feels really nice to hold. Although the soft feel/soft touch (same thing) back feel nice, it can be a little slippery, but not more so than a normal TPU case. At times the grip does feel better I would say its subjective. All of the other key areas that I really loved on my 6P version remain (unlike the Dual Pro Shine).
Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.
Volume/Power buttons: Finally, Incipio made their normal Dual Pro case as good as it should be! The buttons are nothing short of excellent (on par with my Speck case now!) which surprised me after using the Dual Pro Shine with its horrible buttons. Frankly I doubt buttons will get any better than these or the Speck’s (I am open to seeing that happen), but this one is right alongside it. Needless to say you will not be disappointed with any buttons on this case.

Overall: 6.5/10Incipio’s Dual Pro tops my list of excellent cases now that their button issue seen on the Dual Pro Shine seems to have been fixed (or maybe mine was just defective?). The soft touch back panel, dual layered build, and excellent buttons make it one of the best cases I’ve used to date.
Update: After using the case for a few weeks one of the outer shell "plextonium" corners started to become loose and pull away from the inner TPU. I contacted Incipio about this issue, and updated the overall review score.

Incipio Dual Pro




Incipio Octane:
I had high expectations for this case like the other Incipio above, and this case lived up to most of them. First this case is a hybrid style (hybrid cases are my favorite) featuring a TPU type bumper, and a poly-carbonate or possible acrylic frosted back. I have a feeling the back is likely acrylic because cases that are frosted usually are (I will look into whether or not it is). The slides have a nice 'tire' texture, but don't get your hopes up about this providing any more grip than a smooth one because it doesn't. The texture is very much aesthetic which hurts the initial appear of this case. I was hoping the bumper would have provided more grip since most cases that I have are slick which is bad for an all glass phone with a curved display. The case itself is high quality as you might expect from Incipio, but I don't think it's worth the $25 price tag given how some of my 'cheaper' cases are equally nice if not better.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

Volume/Power buttons: The power button will occasionally have issues clicking no matter how I insert the phone making the case frustrating to use at times. The volume buttons also suffer the same issue, so I can't exactly say that's a good thing. If the buttons don't click well it makes recommending this case difficult.


Overall: 8/10 Incipio made an attractive looking case that is hindered by its slippery exterior and stiff buttons like the Dual Pro. I can't recommend it due to the button issues which are a big deal when it comes to using a case, but other than that everything else is good.

Incipio Octane



Incipio Performance Level 4:
After using the Performance Level 3 case, and enjoying how nice it was, I opted to go one step further with the Level 4 case. Now, let me start off by saying the physical design looks very similar, but that’s about it. The case is very different in the way it feels, functions and protects the phone. At first I thought the case was quite nice (as you can see in the unboxing video I posted), but after using it for a few days I found many issues that kept me from really enjoying it in the same way I did the Level 3 case.
First, let’s talk about the design; Incipio opted for a 2-piece case along with a holster which is fine, but they made the bumper area of the outer shell clear which I don’t like at all. While the case does have a nice ‘honeycomb’ textured molded into both the inner TPU and outer PC (technically it’s a 4-layer case) shell that should help distribute the shock effectively. The outer shell has a cheap feel along the edges even though the backside feels nice in a way similar to the Level 3 case.

Secondly, the bottom speaker is covered by the cases shell muffling it, and honestly making the speaker very hard to hear. I don’t know what Incipio was thinking when they designed this particular part because it is nothing short of idiotic.
The case is rated to handle 12[ft] drops which I can see being true despite how mixed feelings about its design. I wish Incipio stayed with their Level 3 design (not just the looks) because it was significantly better. With all of that aside, the included holster functions well and is nice. I prefer this holster design (since you put the phone in vertically) over the way SUPCase has their Beetle Pro holster. It has a hefty belt clip that again isn’t as thick as the SUPCase, but it seems to accommodate larger belts. Another quick point: The Level 3 case will fit in this holster despite being ever so slightly loose, so I wouldn’t use it in the horizontal position.

Lastly, wireless charging only works with some of my chargers using this case. It works just fine with the official Samsung Fast Wireless charger, and the Choetech 10W Fast Wireless Charger. The phone will not charge with my Meenova wireless charger at all for whatever reason. This is still a single coil charger just like my other two, so maybe it has to do with the chargers design, or the distance between coils (the coil in the Meenova might be further away than the other two, thus not allowing it to charge using this case).

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried.

Volume/Power buttons: I’ll start by saying their function is questionable at times. The power button seems to click fine with a nice tactile response, yet the volume rockers do not share this same sentiment. I’ve found that if I click them and miss the center of the button, then it will push the screen protector up which is not a good thing obviously.

Overall: 7.5/10 With every nice feature/additional this case offers it also has a drawback. The added drop protection comes at the cost of mediocre buttons, and a muffled speaker. An included holster is a nice thing, yet the $18 SUPCase also has one, and seems to function better in some key areas. I cannot recommend this case currently unless Incipio addresses some of these major issues; I would stick with the tried and true Level 3 case over this one any day of the week.

Incipio Performance Level 4:



Level 3 vs 4 Quick look
Level 4 Case unboxing
 
Last edited:

Pilz

Senior Member
Dec 1, 2013
7,253
2,596
Texas

Otterbox Symmetry:

I’ve never owned an Otterbox before because I couldn’t get over their clunky design that hindered the user experience. The Symmetry series is their thinnest least intrusive case from my understanding. Otterbox used a 2 material molded design which allowed the case to be 1 piece for ease of use. This design leads to the case having a different structure than your conventional hybrid which is usually a TPU/silicon bumper with a polycarbonate/acrylic back. Here the case has a hard plastic (not sure what type) back half with a high density silicon/TPU front half and core. The pictures below will show a better representation of what I’m referring to. Like many heavy duty cases this one doesn’t provide a lot of grip for some absurd reason. Now, make no mistake this case is still quite large and clunky, but in a more mild mannered way than its bigger sibling the Commuter (or for some other phones the Defender). There is a subtle texture on the back that all Otterbox cases seem to feature, but as I mentioned don’t expect a lot of grip from it. I enjoy the feel of this case, even its large size aside from a big downfall that I will talk about below.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. Since Otterbox is the so called ‘king’ of rugged cases they have huge cutouts to match their reputation. I can see more accessories potentially working with this case due to the large openings which I appreciate. There is a little loss of rigidity on the bottom due to the number and size of the cutouts, but it shouldn’t hinder the protection it provides.

Volume/Power buttons: I still don’t know why manufacturers especially big names like Otterbox can’t make tactile feeling buttons! A lot of companies like Speck (their Candyshell), or even UAG seemed to have mastered this area despite not being as well known. I can’t make excuses for the ‘buttons’ on this case; they are so hard to press the whole side of the case physically moves a large amount just to press any of them. I was really looking forward to using this case when I go hiking due to its rugged nature in a slimmer profile, but not with buttons that need the Hulk to move. This one area is what will make or break a case, and it certainly ruined the case for me. I ended up returning it to BestBuy because I couldn’t deal with this kind of disregard on a $45 case.

Overall: 7/10I truly enjoyed every part of this case, but the most important part of it was a letdown: the buttons. Otterbox knows how to make an excellent case, yet they don’t know what a tactile feeling button is, or how to even ensure they function easily. If you can get over that big drawback I see no reason not to buy this case because it was set to be one of my favorites alongside the Tech 21.


Otterbox Symmetry:



Disclaimer: I was sent these cases in exchange for a fair, unbiased review.

Poetic Affinity:
I first encountered Poetic’s cases back when I had my Nexus 7 (2013) with their folio case. Since then Poetic has added a lot of cases, styles and generally changed their lineup. I was also send their Affinity case for my Nexus 6P earlier, which was later revised after other reviewers and myself brought up some concerns about the design/logos. Poetic doesn’t seem to have any of those issues with their S7 Edge Affinity case (they covered part of the Nexus logo on their 6P case). One thing I really enjoy about the Poetic case is how they kept the “grippy” angled ridges along the case sides. These ridges provide great grip along with giving the case a more “rugged” look.

Along the back you will find ridges to keep the case’s clear section from directly touching any flat surface you put your phone on. This is particularly important because the clear area itself doesn’t seem to be overly scratch resistant, so every little detail like this matters. Each corner is also reinforced with added material to aide in the event of a drop or impact. I haven’t dropped my S7 Edge in this case, but I feel like it would handle most moderate drops as well as other cases in its class.

Poetic sent me both color options to give me (and everyone else) a better idea of what they will look like, and how the differences look. For starters, the black accented case features a glossy top/bottom alongside the regular ridged black polycarbonate ridges. I like the look the black accented case gives because it uniquely offsets the clear sections while still giving the case an appealing look. The clear case handles things a little differently; there are no true glossy sections as seen on the black accented case. The clear one still maintains the exact size, dimension etc of the other color, but everything is clear of course. I think this option would look the best with the black S7 Edge, and the titanium silver which is the one I own.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

Volume/Power buttons: I haven’t been disappointed with the Affinity case’s buttons for any device as of yet, and the same remains true here. All of the buttons are tactile, easy to locate and generally pleasing to use. I will note that the use of a skin/wrap such as SlickWraps or dbrand will make the buttons slightly less response. This won’t impact the cases feel to any meaning extent based on my usage so far, but I will update this note if anything changes.

Overall: 9/10 Overall Poetic did a good job maintaining their design language while also making a solid case for the S7 Edge. I think the rugged style look will appeal to some people more than others, but there are no real major flaws in this case. My only concerns are with the clear area picking up scratches (I did notice a few after using it for a day, although none were really noticeable unless you went looking for them).


Poetic Affinity Black/Clear:






Poetic Affinity Clear/Clear:



Ringke Fusion:

Ringke is known for their sleek low profile cases which include their Fusion and slim fit lines. I opted for the Fusion in clear because it's nice to be able to see your phone while still protecting it. The Ringke Fusion comes with a clear film to place over the back of your phone so it doesn't have the rainbow effect that most polycarbonate clear cases suffer from. I accidentally installed the film in a rush and ruined it, but that's okay. You will notice that rainbow effect in the pictures because of this, but don't let that steer you away from this case. The back of the case has tiny feet on each corner to help keep your clear back scratch free along with its scratch resistant (not scratch proof) coating to ensure it stays good looking longer. I'm not sure if it's just my case or not, but I've noticed a bit of scratching on the back already. I've only used the case a few times since it arrived, so I hope it doesn't get worse at this rate. I know some of you might ask about yellowing because this is a clear case, but I own the same one for my Nexus 6P (since it was released) and haven't seen any discoloration at all ~5 months later. Any clear case can yellow it just depends on certain conditions which comes with the territory. The case is a gigantic dust magnet like any other clear case. I had a can of air next to my while taking the pictures along with a microfiber cloth. I can't count the number of times I wiped the phone off and blew away the dust then put it in the case only to see more dirt and dust that magically got in there.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones; all microphone cutouts are also present. Ringke opted to have port covers to keep dust out of the headphone jack and micro USB port. Although this isn't a big deal because the S7/S7E are both water resistant therefore also dust resistant, it's a nice touch to have on a non-bulky case.

Volume/Power buttons: Ringke always has excellent buttons, but these are easier to accidentally push unlike the Tech 21. Their feel is identical to my LUVVITT case in a good way. You won't be disappointed here.

Overall: 8.5/10 Ringke should have opted for a better way to avoid the notorious rain-bowing effect that's present on this case instead of including 1 film to install on the back of your phone. I know other manufacturers have found a better way to address this, so it makes using the case without a skin on my phone hard due to that. I've also noticed some scratching on the back already after using the case a handful of times which I hope doesn't get worse in a short period of time.


Ringke Fusion




Ringke Onyx:
Ringke made some bold claims on their product page for this case, so I decided to give it a chance. In the usual Ringke style you will find port covers (not really necessary for the S7/S7 Edge due to their IP68 rating), and a generally slim profile. I was very surprised to open my Amazon box and see a case that was shaped more for a banana phone. The case arrived so bent I was waiting for curious George to take it away. Despite this rather interesting situation I found myself in, I decided to write my review of this case ignoring that issue in the overall rating. (it might not be Ringke’s fault the case arrived damaged even though it was in an undamaged box with plenty of air pockets) I want to note how Ringke’s claim that this case will give you a better grip is completely false unless you count the sharp edges digging into your hand “better grip”. Yes, all of the edges on this case are sharp enough to shave with since Ringke must want this to be a true utilitarian item with its rugged design. Aside from the bad puns I’ve been adding in here the case has a different design that you typically find out there. Ringke did opt for the brushed metal TPU look, but with a catch. There are little dots recessed into the TPU like a dot view case giving it an interesting look. I don’t know how I personally feel about them, but nonetheless they’re going to stare at you every time you put down the phone. I do appreciate the case of a raised bevel to protect the camera like I first saw on their Fusion Air case. This should also help protect that area in general from other impacts which is a plus.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

Volume/Power buttons: If I ignore how the banana case was sitting on my phone, the buttons would click just fine, and in fact were identical to Ringke’s others two cases I have in terms of feel. It’s not every day that a company’s cases will have this type of consistency in at least one area.
Overall: 6/10 I’m not quite sure what Ringke had in mind when they decided to make this case. It does not provide any additional grip from what I can tell using it, the edges are essentially razors, and the port covers are a little over the top. I do like how the buttons still have a consistent feel, but other than that and the raised camera lip the case is more of a flop.

Ringke Onyx:








Here you can see the nice banana-like shape it has





Ringke Fusion Air:
Ringke decided to make a case that is a different take on their normal yet popular Fusion line. The Ringke Fusion Air is a slightly thinner 100% TPU version of the standard version from what I can tell with a few small changes. First, Ringke added in a dot matrix to the inside of the case to prevent the watermarking I first noticed on my Fusion. Next, they added in a slightly raised “U-Shaped” camera bevel to help better protect the sensor. Other than those small changes everything else largely remained the same; however, since the TPU is very thin, the sides are easy to pull from the edge which is concerning to me.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

Volume/Power buttons: The same as the normal Fusion: “Ringke always has excellent buttons, but these are easier to accidentally push unlike the Tech 21. Their feel is identical to my LUVVITT case in a good way. You won't be disappointed here.”
Overall: 7/10 Ringke made a rather compelling slim TPU case that addressed many of the issues with its larger sibling, but it also an issue. The sides of the case were abnormally loose due to the thinness of the TPU. This makes it very hard to fully recommend the case because it could cause issues during normal use.


Ringke Fusion Air:





Speck Candyshell:

I really liked my Speck Candyshell for my Nexus 6P, so I wanted to also get one for my S7 Edge. The first Speck I bought for this phone was their Oynx black ‘clear’ case. It was horrible, with buttons that did not move at all (maybe it was defective) either way I sent it back. Today I saw the white Candyshell in the store, so I decided to buy it because it’s the same color as my other one that I have. Speck has the best grip out of any case I’ve used period. If you drop this case then your hands are probably covered in oil/butter/soap because it’s that good. The reason I bought the white one over the black Candyshell is because for better or worse the plastic back scratches relatively easily, thus the white one would show the scratches less. Speck’s case is a hybrid with a plastic back wrapped around a TPU core that is Mil-Spec drop test rated for added confidence. I think Speck nailed it with this case compared to the Otterbox equivalent.
I’m going to repeat some things here because there is only so much you can say about the port/headphone cutouts

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. Speck’s headphone and micro USB port are oversized, so most if not all cables should work just fine.

Volume/Power buttons: This case has the best buttons hands down as of [3/11] when writing this. They are tactile, easy to find, and just overall perfect! I don’t know how they could get better other than to have a texture on the vol+ and power buttons to help quickly identify them. I will be surprised to find better feeling buttons on a case.

Overall: 9.5/10 Speck has the best overall case so far with their super ‘grippy’ back, superb buttons, and Mil-Spec drop test rating this is the case if you need just 1. (I will update this if I find a better one.)

Speck Candyshell:




Incipio Performance Level 3:
I was intrigued by Incipio when they first announced their Performance series earlier this year; I wasn’t sure what to expect from the bold claims they made until I received this one the other day. First let me state how this case is very reminiscent of a thinner Otterbox in terms of feel, but with a significantly improved profile and button design. I haven’t tried to hide the hit and miss experience encountered with Incipio’s cases as of lately. I do appreciate their general desire to fix issues when they occur. According to the box, this case can handle 9[ft] drops (their level 4 case apparently handles 12[ft] ones when it gets released. This means you shouldn’t have to worry about your phone breaking during a hard fall just like the Tech 21, or Speck Candyshell. I dropped my phone earlier today in this case after washing my hands, and it fell about 6[ft] down a step. I wasn’t as worried given the cases ‘rated drop protection’; thankfully I was proven right and the phone/case came out 100% undamaged without even the smallest mark!

Make no mistake, this case is not a TPU style, in fact I’m not quite sure what you would call the material. Incipio calls this particular case a “tri-molded design” featuring a polycarbonate back that certainly doesn’t scratch easily. The case has a unique inverse ridge (the cyan colored section for the black case I have) that is a different material than the back, or bumper judging by the language used on their website. I think the design is very interesting, and it feels great. While the case may be a little slippery, it’s no more so than a conventional TPU case in my experience. Overall it still beats the oil slick Tech 21 Evo Frame. I appreciate the use of a subtle texturing throughout the case that I’m sure helps prevent scratches in some capacity.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. The ports might not be aligned 100% perfectly on this case, but that’s more a common issue among S7 Edge cases that I have seen. It doesn’t present any issues in terms of the functionality of the case, but it will bother some people.

Volume/Power buttons: Generally speaking, I’ve never been fond of flat styled volume or power buttons on a case; Incipio has made me reconsider that viewpoint. I think they did an exceptional job making the flush buttons work well unlike the ones on Spigen’s Tough Armor. Finding the buttons is easy due the inverted cyan ridge that runs around the cases frame. These buttons are also every bit as tactile as my Speck, or any other case that has good buttons.

Overall: 9.5/10For the first time I think I’ve found a case that walks the fine line between excellent protection, thin form, and durability. It’s slightly bigger than the Tech 21, but still smaller than my large Speck while still offering a balance between those two in terms of grip and other aspects. I Plan to use this case as my new DD for the reasons mentioned.


Incipio Performance Level 3:


 
Last edited:

Pilz

Senior Member
Dec 1, 2013
7,253
2,596
Texas

Incipio Stowaway:
As a full-time undergraduate (soon to be graduate) student I don’t like to carry more things that I absolutely need on a daily basis. I always have my phone with me for the usual reasons like emails, browsing the web, music etc., but I’ve come to realize that some payment terminals are dumb and always give an error with Samsung Pay. (There’s one place around me in particular that does work, but it sometimes takes 4-5 attempts for an unknown reason; other times it works there flawlessly.) I decided that I wanted to get a wallet or rather card case for my S7 Edge to supplement Samsung Pay along with my drivers license, and credit card just in case.

Initially, I ordered this case way back when the S7 Edge was first shipping and Incipio posted pre-orders on Amazon. Then, sometime afterwards I canceled the order due to the release date still being unknown. Now that the case has been released I decided to still get one, but this time I ordered directly from Incipio.
The case comes with what at first seemed like an oddly small screen protector, but it’s nothing of that particular sort. Instead, the film is to be placed on the back of the device to prevent your cards from scratching the glass. Since the card area opens up directly to the glass of your phone in order to accommodate the 3 cards it fits, this was Incipio’s solution. I don’t mind the idea personally in order to cut down on the already large size of this particular case, but I’m sure there will be people out there that hate it. Incipio shows the card cover being used as a kick stand on their website, yet when I tried to stand the phone up with it, the phone would fall no matter what. Maybe at some point it will allow me to stand it up like that, but for now it simply won’t. I don’t care for kickstands anyway, so this doesn’t matter to me in the greater scheme of things. I like how the case is able to accommodate 3 cards (I had my drivers license, credit card, and CCW in there with a tiny bit of room left for maybe a business card too).

There were some issues since this was a first batch case from what I can tell after speaking with Incipio at length earlier this afternoon. I noticed tons of molding marks around the card flap that didn’t feel as refined as they should. Incipio was nice enough to send me a replacement, so for now I will leave that negative bit out of my overall rating by going under the assumption that the replacement will be better. If it is not better, then I will update this review to reflect that.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones; all microphone cutouts are also present.

Volume/Power buttons: All of the buttons function with a pleasant natural click, and gave me no issues while using it this evening.
Overall: 8.5/10 Incipio made a nice looking case that hopefully won’t experience any of the issues seen on their Dual Pro after a few weeks of use. I am skeptical about the card cover working as a kickstand, but for now it doesn’t.

Incipio Stowaway:






LUVVITT TPU:

This is my first case from LUVVITT, and certainly won’t be my last. The case itself looks like a clone of the Spigen Rugged Armor, but in some ways it’s better. First, the case has a lower profile than the Spigen which is good if you want a thinner TPU case, but bad if you expect the same level of protection as the Spigen. The TPU has a nice feel to it, and almost features a ‘softness’ to the back which makes it comfortable to hold. On the backside the faux carbon is much less pronounced than the Spigen, but overall it still looks nice. There is also a raised lip for the camera to help prevent any damage when laying it down on the table.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones; all microphone cutouts are also present.
Volume/Power buttons: This case has excellent buttons unlike some of the others. I cannot stand when cases have horrible buttons that don’t have a distinguishable click (i.e. not responsive). These click perfectly, so you should not be disappointed on that front.

Overall: 9/10 The overall feel of the case is great with nice tactile buttons, and low profile. The only downside I can find for this case is the fake ‘screws’ on the back, but that’s cosmetic and does not affect the quality of the case.

LUVVITT TPU




Spigen Wallet: After my disappointment with the Tech 21 EVO Wallet, I wanted to try another folio style case that might be better at a much lower price. I ordered this case a while ago during their $4 sale, and it just arrived the other day. Overall the feel of the case is about what I expected: the texture nothing fancy, but rather a simple generic faux leather like feel on the outside of the case. Inside you will find 3 card slots, and an internal pocket for cash, or some other small thin paper. The case that is affixed to the folio is actually their slim fit case with a few slight changes to make it fit inside the folio properly. I was disappointed to yet again receive a bent case from Amazon. I don’t know why I’ve been lucky enough to get damaged cases late, but it needs to be corrected. I won’t let that count against the case for this review despite the damage being quite obvious.

On the outside of the folio there is also a magnetic flat to keep the case closed when you’re not using it which is something that not every folio offers but should. It does fold around to the backside of the case in an attempt to keep it out of the way during use of the phone. I don’t like how Spigen has their card pockets inside because they’re quite large, and deep which allows the case to really get thick in a hurry. I had difficulty closing the case with the magnetic flap when 3 cards were inside of it with/without the phone. I even tried to ‘unbend’ the case to see if that would make a difference but it did not. I noticed how the flap would occasionally come off because of this design issue. Overall the case was harder to get used to than my Tech 21 Evo Wallet, and significantly thicker even without a card in it due to its design. There is also no sleep/wake magnet built into the case; not that I expected one even at its normal selling price. I don’t know why more companies don’t offer the sleep/wake magnet in their cases to make the folio better.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

Volume/Power buttons: The case has cutouts for the buttons, so there is no issue using them.

Overall: 6.5/10 There are a few key issues with this case: First, the case has card slots that are overly large which adds bulk. Second, the durability seems questionable since it started to suffer plastic deformation when I tried to bend it back to it’s original shape slightly. (this is different than it arriving bent because it started to physically break when I use minimal effort to bend it back). Lastly, the phone is very difficult to use in the folio even when the back cover is folded back; when you add in the lack of a sleep/wake function it makes this case even harder to recommend.

Spigen Wallet:



Without Cards







With Cards in it








Spigen Rugged Armor:
Spigen cases are usually my go to when I get a new phone due to their quality, and overall nice design. I haven’t liked their recent offers with the disaster they created with their Nexus 6P NeoHybrid EX. I decided to stay with the cases that I know will always be worry free (from past experience). The Rugged Armor is one of their best-selling cases, and one look at it will explain why. Spigen has opted for a simple TPU case with faux carbon fiber ‘inserts’ that provide a unique look which many other case makers have copied (LUVVITT). Spigen’s offering is thicker than some of the other TPU cases out there hence its name ‘Rugged Armor’. This case is by no means intended to handle big drops like the Tech 21, Speck, or Otterbox, but it will work just fine for everyday accidents. Spigen added in a small raised lip for the camera too which I think is a nice touch to help protect your new S7 Edge from any potential damage. The back of the case has a nice smooth texture that is hard to really explain. It feels soft, but at the same time durable.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. Spigens headphone/USB port cutouts are usually on the larger side, so they might accommodate some slightly larger cables/headphones depending on how big they are.
Volume/Power buttons: Just like the Tech 21 case, Spigen has tactile buttons that are easy to press, but they are harder to accidentally knock.

Overall: 9/10Spigen has one of the best TPU cases out there today, (maybe Diztronic will make a S7E case soon) that provides you with slim good looking protection for your everyday routine.

Spigen Rugged Armor:





Spigen NeoHybrid Crystal:

With every phone I find it increasingly difficult to find a good clear case. The S7E has cases continue this trend with none of them really being great. I was really hoping Spigen corrected all of their mistakes on the Nexus 6P’s NeoHybrid EX (now called the crystal), and to an extent Spigen did. The buttons were removed from the frame, and molded into the TPU which helped fix one issue while also ignoring another one (see below in the buttons section). The clear area of the case has a ‘dot matrix’ inside texture that helps prevent the clear area from sticking to your phone and giving you the rainbow effect seen on the Ringke/Spigen Ultra Hybrid. I like the use of this pattern because it doesn’t distort the clarity of the clear section enough to be noticeable, yet it adds some good benefits. My big issue with this case is how the frame sits on the TPU portion. If you install the frame from either the top or bottom as described in the instructions the sides will be very loose. I’m not talking about the frame falling off per say, but the sides are loose enough to fit a business card between the frame/case. That’s not a good thing when you consider that I pulled the frame out in that area just by picking up my phone. My fingers will constantly ‘catch’ the frame along the sides thus pulling it out and making the case feel cheap. Since the frame is loose along the sides it also gives the case a ‘squishy’ feeling when you hold it. I cannot stand how much flex this has due to the frame not sitting correctly. It boils down to how the frame is tensioned when installing it. The bottom is secured first, then you pop it on the sides before finally pushing the top part into the TPU section. This puts a lot of tension in the 4 corners of the case, this making the sides loose since they are the longest part of the frame. The top/bottom have more TPU to sit in, so they are very snug, but the sides are just horribly loose. My Nexus 6P case had the same issue which was ‘revised’ later one, yet the issue persisted even with the new version. If Spigen does “try” to fix this for the S7E I can’t confidently say it will do anything beneficial.
I’m going to repeat some things here because there is only so much you can say about the port/headphone cutouts

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

Volume/Power buttons: The buttons themselves click perfectly fine until you install the frame. Now, since the frame is loose along the sides it almost sits flush with the buttons which makes them harder to located and press. Spigen needs to completely redesign their NeoHybrid Crystal to avoid this issue rather than adjust little things here and there while avoiding the bigger issue.

Overall: 6.5/10There is a lot of potential for this case, but all of that is wasted on a flimsy, poorly design plastic bumper that cheaply wraps together a great TPU case. The bumper is the single biggest let down here, and I hope it will be swiftly corrected. Spigen’s clear TPU is one of the best I’ve seen, so it’s disappointing to see it paired with such a terrible bumper.

Spigen NeoHybrid Crystal:


 
Last edited:

Pilz

Senior Member
Dec 1, 2013
7,253
2,596
Texas

Spigen NeoHybrid:

This was Spigen’s original hybrid style case that they are known for, so you would expect their flagship case to be their best. There’s some bad news here like with the NeoHybrid Crystal I reviewed earlier: the plastic bumper still does not sit flush on the sides. Of my 6 Spigen case styles 3 of them have rather large issues including some of their most popular models.
I have to hand it to Spigen, they have one of the best feeling TPU cases I’ve used to date, and this remains true for this case. The back is subtly textured giving you a little more grip than a standard TPU case or their other ones I’ve reviewed. Spigen opted for a style similar to Verus (VRS Design) where only the center portion has a texture while a small strip on the top/bottom of the case are just normal TPU as can be seen in the pictures. I mentioned this in my Verus High Pro Shield review: this type of hybrid style case hasn’t truly been great since the days of my Note 3 and its NeoHybrid that I loved. I think case manufacturers need to rethink the way their bumper (plastic) is designed and maybe opt for another material, or way to hold it in place better.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

Volume/Power buttons: The buttons themselves are great when you remove the plastic bumper, but when it’s installed they are nothing short of a nightmare. I don’t know why anyone would want their buttons to be flush with the frame because it allows for accidental presses (I can push the frame near the buttons and it will catch the TPU button and press it) along with user frustration. What should be the easiest part of a case to perfect turns out to be the part where most companies struggle. The issue here isn’t even the buttons necessarily, it’s how the frame forces them to sit flush, and causes 99% of the issues.

Overall: 6/10 A flagship case should be nothing short of the best in a company’s line up, but here it’s everything but that. The NeoHybrid had it’s moment of fame before phones shapes started to force a change in their design. What consumers are left with is a fantastic looking case that takes form over function with the numerous bumper issues manufacturers are having. I’ve reached out to Spigen several times about this exact issue, yet they have failed to address it time and time again. I think this will be my last NeoHybrid case, or any case with this design due to the numerous issues I’ve seen.

Spigen NeoHybrid: (ignore my wet install screen protectors bubbles :)









As you can see the bumper bows outward, and has a small gap still.





Spigen Liquid Crystal:
When I started to look for a clear case initially I found a lot of choices with some drawbacks. I was hoping to use a clear case to show off my S7 Edge with my SlickWraps skin since the normal back is way to reflective given that it’s silver (and essentially a mirror). Spigen seems to have either a hit/miss with their cases without a middle ground in sight. The liquid crystal is a hit with its low profile (just like the Thin Fit), and great overall feel. Spigen opted to use a dot matrix on the inside of the TPU to prevent it from having a rainbow effect as I noticed on my Ringke Fusion when the included matte protector wasn’t used. Given how the texture (barely noticeable) dot matrix is on the inside of the case it helps prevent dust from getting inside better than my other two clear cases did. The one downfall here is the slickness of the TPU. Unlike their Rugged Armor, this TPU is slippery, and a fingerprint magnet (less so than my Ringke Fusion or Ultra Hybrid). I wouldn’t say the case feels ‘premium’, but it does feel nice for the $2.99 I paid for it.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

Volume/Power buttons: All of the buttons are excellent, tactile, and raised just enough to easily find. You won’t find any issues here, so that makes me like this case even more!

Overall: 9.25/10
Spigen Liquid Crystal
The liquid crystal isn’t trying to be anything more than a simple clear TPU case, and it does that very well. It features great buttons, a slim profile, and a back region that doesn’t suffer from the rainbow effect. If you don’t need any extra grip, then I would recommend this case for a simple, effective TPU case.





Spigen Thin Fit:

I always like to have a slim case for my phones when using them at home because I don’t need any real protection besides from scratches and very small drops onto my carpet. I usually end up with the Spigen Thin Fit or Ringke Slim depending on which company offers a better thin fitting case for that particular phone. I chose the Spigen one this time around because it was available first, and like the Ringke it offers top/bottom protection. The case also has one of my favorite textures which is a ‘soft feel’ finish like the Nexus 5 (black model) had. It not only adds some grip to the case, it also just feels nice to hold. The case itself is extremely low profile and barely offers any face down ‘lift’ for your phone. Don’t expect this case to offer any real drop protection beyond a foot or so (even then it might be a gamble), but everyone’s experience will vary on that front. There is also a raised lip for the camera just like on their Rugged Armor which I like a lot.
I’m going to repeat some things here because there is only so much you can say about the port/headphone cutouts

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. Spigens headphone/USB port cutouts are usually on the larger side, so they might accommodate some slightly larger cables/headphones depending on how big they are.

Volume/Power buttons: There isn’t a whole lot to be said here since the button cutouts are completely open so you can easily access the phones actual buttons. There is ample room for your fingers, but not too much so it unnecessarily exposes the phone.

Overall: 9.5/10Spigen is still making my favorite slim case the way they always have with the addition of top/bottom coverage. This is the slim case to get if that’s your style I highly recommend it!

Spigen Thin Fit:




Spigen Tough Armor:

I decided to give Spigen’s other cases a chance because of the great deal they had on Amazon a few days ago. The Tough Armor is Spigen’s version of a true rugged case; it is the same as their slim armor with more bulk for added protection. The case does feature a small kickstand that only functions in one landscape position. I wouldn’t trust it to last considering how it’s made out of plastic with a very flimsy feel to it. The shell of the case is a plastic or soft with a smooth finish which as with other companies cases provides zero grip. As I mentioned above, these companies must want you to drop your phone in their rugged cases since they aren’t making them easy to hold with their large size and smooth surfaces. Spigen did add a glossy finish to their camera cutout that has a nice appearance to it even if it serves no function. The cutout still allows for easy access to the heart rate sensor which I completely forgot existed since I will never use it. The inner layer is made from Spigens high density TPU in a thicker form similar to the kind that is also used on their other cases.

I’m going to repeat some things here because there is only so much you can say about the port/headphone cutouts

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. Spigen has ample room as with all of their cases, and their cutouts line up well with each port.

Volume/Power buttons: I’m not sure why Spigen opted for buttons that are flush with the sides of the case. While these buttons do click well the way they’re implemented is questionable. I have no other real complaints besides how they sit, so you should be able to easily click the buttons assuming you can locate each one.

Overall: 7.5/10Spigen did a lot of things right with this case including their use of thicker top/bottom TPU sections for added drop protection, but they dropped the ball in other areas. The kick stand is more of an afterthought, and should be removed if they aren’t going to make it more stable/durable. Next, the buttons are flush with the case which makes it hard to locate them. These are the only flaws I could find with a case that fits the bill in all other aspects.

Spigen Tough Armor:





Spigen Ultra Hybrid:

Spigens case line up can get a little confusing with all of their very similar cases (slim armor, rugged armor, tough armor, NeoHybrid EX, Ultra Hybrid, and the crystal clear case). Their Ultra Hybrid usually tries to remain slim while offering a nice styling similar to what the slim armor is in their line up. The bumper around case is a TPU, while the back is polycarbonate. Unlike their NeoHybrid EX (the clear one) it doesn’t have a dot matrix style pattern to prevent fingerprints/smudges on the inside. Just like the Ringke Fusion this case is a fingerprint/dirt magnet for no apparent reason. It could be the coating on the polycarbonate, or another factor, but I didn’t have this issue on my Nexus 6P’s Ultra Hybrid case. This case also has 4 small feet to keep the back raised off a surface, and a scratch resistant coating on the back side (not the inside) just like the Ringke. As with all clear cases, there is no added grip from the back due to its anti-scratch coating.
I’m going to repeat some things here because there is only so much you can say about the port/headphone cutouts

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. Spigens headphone/USB port cutouts are usually on the larger side, so they might accommodate some slightly larger cables/headphones depending on how big they are.

Volume/Power buttons: I am very disappointed with the buttons on this case. Spigen’s other case that I have features great tactile buttons, but this one’s are like pressing concrete. They might be worse than the Incipio Dual Pro Shine I reviewed above which is quite a feat. I’ve only used this case one time because it’s unbearable to use the buttons.

Overall: 7/10Spigen opted for their tried and true physical design with a catch: horrible buttons. I can deal with smudges, dirt and other issues, but the buttons not pressing is what kills the case for me. I know Spigen loves revising cases during their normal cycle without telling anyone, so knowing them there will be a new version of this case at some point (just like they did with the 6P) to fix any issues.

Spigen Ultra Hybrid:

Note: In the pictures the areas that look like smudges are where the case is touching the glass back of the phone, so you also get to deal with that.




Supcase Beetle:
Supcase is known for their unique designs, and rugged cases. Their line up usually consists of two primary cases: Beetle, and Beetle Pro. The first one is their thinner case which still provides ample protection with minimal bulk. The later version is more similar to an Otterbox Defender with over the top protection. I prefer minimal cases with the most protection out of preference, this is why I bought the regular Beetle. The Supcase utilizes a hybrid design featuring a TPU bumper and acrylic clear frosted back (they also have a solid black version). All 4 corners are designed to take larger impacts due to their size which also helps you grip the phone since the back isn’t exactly textured. There are 4 little circles around the back of the case too that are designed to keep the back lifted ever so slightly (paper thin) off a table so you won’t get scratches on it. I’ve used their cases for a long time now, most recently on my Nexus 6P. That particular case doesn’t show any external wear from use/falling on a treadmill numerous times while working out (my 6P still lives to tell the tale). The one downside about their frost clear back panel is that it scratches easily from the inside. When I place my phone in the case occasionally it would have the corner touch the inside frosted back and leave a permanent mark. Personally this isn’t a big deal to me, but I wanted to make everyone aware that this occurs.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

Volume/Power buttons: Supcase usually has tactile buttons that lean more toward the stiffer side of the spectrum. This case falls in line with that giving you a nice responsive feel more in line with the Speck/Incipio Dual Pro.

Overall: 9/10 I enjoy using this case at the gym given its extra corner protection in a slimmer profile despite the back picking up marks easily while inserting your phone. Supcase still provides a great protective case in a slim profile relative to some of the other ones I have. This case rounds out my top 3 favorite hybrid cases as of [3/23].


Supcase Beetle





Tech 21 EVO Frame:

I’ve heard a lot of good things about Tech 21 cases over the years, but this is my first one. I decided to opt for more protection in a slimmer package due to the S7E’s unique yet fragile design. This case is very tall compared to the rest of my line up due to the added in drop protection. Tech 21 claims their case is rated for a 2.2[m] ~6[ft] drop making it fairly heavy duty for everyday situations. There is a unique cushioning area in the extended top/bottom portions of the case which is likely why it has a higher drop test rating. The case is on the thinner side too making it comfortable to hold all while adding in extra drop protection. My one complaint with this case is how slippery it is. I think it’s ironic how the case is rated to handle drops, but then is slippery. It’s like they want you to drop your phone given how slick the outer edge can be. Around the backside the case has more of a TPU smoothness to it reminiscent of the Spigen Rugged Armor or LUVVITT TPU case. This is another expensive case that I believe is worth the money at the time of writing this. I had a Speck Candyshell in Oynx earlier one, but the buttons were so bad (edges were very thick too) I had to return it which is something I rarely do with cases.

I’m going to repeat some things here because there is only so much you can say about the port/headphone cutouts

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. The bottom/top cutouts are enlarged due to the added thickness that comes with the drop protection, but there still should be ample room for all of the normal things you would plug in.

Volume/Power buttons: Tech 21 nailed the buttons on their EVO Frame case. They have an excellent tactile feel that provides just enough resistance so you won’t accidentally press them. I have nothing but good things to say about the button feel here.

Overall: 9/10I like many things about this case that put it at the top of my list, but the slick edges make me fumble with my new ~$800 phone more than I would like.

Tech 21 EVO Frame


 
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Pilz

Senior Member
Dec 1, 2013
7,253
2,596
Texas

Tech 21 EVO Wallet:

I enjoyed my first Tech 21 case enough to get their wallet/folio version of it. There is a lot to like about this case: nice feel, drop protection, magnetic closing cover, 1 card slot etc... I mainly wanted to get a wallet case so I could carry my drivers license with me while at school without carrying my wallet. Samsung Pay really revolutionized mobile payments in my opinion. I was a long time user of Google Wallet/Android Pay, but nothing compares Samsung Pay. I like how I only need to carry the phone and my DL which all fits into a slim package that Tech 21 has offered. The case has a nice angled ribbing on the folio section that provides a good amount of grip (of course not as good as the Speck). I’m not worried about breaking my phone if I drop it in this case due to its all-around protection. There is a cutout for the notification LED, and front earpiece so you can easily make calls/see notifications while the cover is closed.
Before I go on there is one HUGE downfall to this case that might ruin it for most people. The case does NOT have a sleep/wake function built into it for some reason that I cannot explain. I was on the verge of bringing it back the second I noticed this when I got into my car, but I figured would give it a day of use before I made that choice. I like everything else about this case despite not liking folios in general, but that is a big enough omission to kill the case.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. The bottom/top cutouts are enlarged due to the added thickness that comes with the drop protection, but there still should be ample room for all of the normal things you would plug in.

Volume/Power buttons: (same for the EVO Wallet) Tech 21 nailed the buttons on their EVO Wallet case. They have an excellent tactile feel that provides just enough resistance so you won’t accidentally press them. I have nothing but good things to say about the button feel here. There is a built in area on the folio section so you can press/know where the volume rockers are with the cover closed. On the power button side no side marking/feature exists, but you can still press the power button through the cover if you feel for it. This isn’t necessarily a pitfall alone, but the combination of no sleep/wake in the cover makes it very difficult to use the case.

Overall: 7.5/10 There’s no doubt that Tech 21 makes nice cases, but they fell short on their EVO Wallet in the biggest way on this case. A Folio case should always have a sleep/wake function built into it, but Tech 21 did not include this for some reason, thus using the case can be cumbersome. If you can handle that omission, then this case is probably the best folio in terms of protection/functionality out there currently.

Tech 21 EVO Wallet





UAG:
I was looking for another rugged, lightweight, & thin case which is when I remembered that UAG made cases. I always have a Nexus phone, so UAG isn’t keen on making cases for them aside from the clear version they had for the Motorola Nexus 6. I’ve heard good things about their cases from members on here as well, but now I am left asking myself what the really appeal was. Let’s start with the cases feel; it’s very boxy, and not in any way that I can appreciate/come to terms with. The case makes holding the phone very uncomfortable to put it bluntly. The top/bottom sides are as flat as can be with reinforced corners for added drop protection. Along the sides you will find some small divots whose goal is to provide more grip while holding this monster; they do in fact help give the sides more grip, but this case still makes the S7E feel closer to the size of my Nexus 6P in a normal TPU or hybrid case that I would use. Due to the way Samsung designed the S7 Edge, the UAG feels awkward to hold even when I compare it to my Supcase/Speck/Dual Pro/Poetic for my Nexus 6P; all of those cases are on the larger side too. UAG might make a case that protectors your phone from drops, and is “military drop tested” aka MILSPEC, but so is the Speck Candyshell. The Speck is exponentially more comfortable to hold, use and just generally looks better even with its ‘zebra’ color scheme. Another disappointing point about this case is the rather large scratch that’s on the inside. It arrived with plenty of scratches/marks on it, and the packaging didn’t have any film on the case to protect it during shipping. Then there’s the color, what UAG shows online is a deep blue, now what I received is more of a cheap toy looking ‘clearish’ McDonalds happy meal toy blue. I don’t know how else to describe the color, just know it’s not pretty.

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

Volume/Power buttons: The buttons click exceptionally well, yet they still fall short of the Speck and Dual Pro cases. Since UAG has a overly boxy design to this case the buttons are a lot harder to reach naturally. They don’t sit close to the bottom like they should, so this means you will routinely try to click the frame and not the actual button as I found out. One nice point to note is how UAG textured their power button, this still doesn’t make it any easier to find when using this case due to its design.

Overall: 7/10 I hoped for another great case, especially since this was my first UAG; sadly, I was left with a case less ergonomic than the Otterbox Symmetry with more compromises than sides to its square shape. Despite the cases tactile, nice feeling buttons, their placement ruins the experience.


UAG







Verus Damda Clip:

I’ve never had a card case for my phone before, but with the S7E’s Samsung Pay, I wanted to carry the least amount of cards possible in my wallet. I was eyeing this case for a while before Verus decided to send me one, so I was happy to get a chance to use it. I first want to start with some bad news; the case only conditionally works with wireless charging. I’ve tried it on all 3 of my wireless chargers (Samsung fast/Samsung standard/Choetech fast) and it only works on occasion. You can play with the positioning all day and it will charge for a moment or two before it inevitably stops. This is the first case I’ve used that does not work with wireless charging which really makes it hard for me to use. I personally prefer wireless charging over wired, especially when using a micro USB port and not a Type-C like on my 6P. The back of the case has a smooth, not at all ‘grippy’ plastic finish reminiscent of my old Samsung GSIII (for those of you who remember that beauty). Since I was sent the silver one it started to show some marks right away when I placed it on my coffee table, and measured it with my digital caliper. That’s not something that seems promising for the longevity of the case. I certainly do not mind if my cases get scratched during use, but I do mind when it happens without actually using the case for more than a few minutes. Now, the card slot on the back appears to be able to hold 1-3 cards depending on their thickness. It is angled downward to one side, and toward the camera module on the phone (I’m not sure why, see the pictures below). The clip itself doesn’t feel like it would stand up to daily use especially not with more than 1 card in there at a time. I had a little difficulty removing a card I placed in there for the pictures due to the friction from the inner TPU shell. It doesn’t feel overly bulky while you hold it, but it does like to slide around in my hand more than I’m comfortable with.
Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.
Volume/Power buttons: All of the buttons are tactile/responsive thus giving this case a little silver lining that still can’t overcome its other pitfalls.
Overall: 6.5/10 I am concerned with the longevity of the card clip on this case, and its overall durability given how soft the plastic seemed during my short use of it. The buttons are tactile (not the best, but still ‘good’), and the design is interesting overall. None of these good areas can outshine the issues with the case unless they get corrected at some point.

Verus Damda Clip:









With 1 card inside:






Disclaimer: I was given these cases by VRS Designs (Verus) in exchange for my honest, and unbiased review/feedback.


Verus High Pro Shield:

This is only my second time getting cases from Verus, so I was hoping for the best. My first case I purchased from them was for my Nexus 6P, and it was anything but great. Verus reached out to me and asked for feedback on their S7 Edge cases, so I was happy to help out.
Spigen has set a popular trend with their once great NeoHybrid line that has since gone downhill (as you can see in my reviews), which left a gap for other case makers to step in. Verus took this design of a plastic bumper/TPU case and added their own touch to it. The case features a brushed metal finish that looks quite pleasing, but doesn’t offer a whole lot in terms of the grip you might expect. The buttons float freely inside the plastic frame as well unlike their other High Pro Shield model that I have for my Nexus 6P which has them build into the TPU. I like the feel of the case despite it’s lack of grip on this already fragile phone. I was disappointed to feel how much the case moved or ‘flexed’ while holding it in my hand; this makes me very weary of using it in an environment where I could drop my phone on a hard surface (i.e. not at home on my carpet).

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. So far everything I’ve thrown at it fits which is a good start for this case.

Volume/Power buttons: These buttons do click, but they suffer from the same frame flex that the Spigen has to a lesser extent. The whole plastic frame moves slightly as you depress each button, or simply hold it for that matter. To top things off the buttons also nearly sit flush with the frame thus making it even more similar to other plagued cases I’ve had to displeasure of using. If Verus used their design with the buttons affixed to the TPU (molded into it), then I believe that would fix some, but not all of these issues. The whole plastic frame/TPU case concept was great back when I had my Note 3, but ever since then I have not found a case like this that actually works well. The good old days of this style seem to be gone, and while I might miss those times, there are better case designs now.

Overall: 6/10 Verus tried to correct some of the issues that are dragging other case manufacturers down, and to an extent they have. There are still many issues that need to be worked out before I will buy/use a case of this design again. I’ve given this styling many chances over the course of 5 phones only to be left in the dark disappointed asking myself why I keep using something that doesn’t work well.

Verus High Pro Shield:




pilz/Table_S7E_9.jpg[/IMG][/URL]


Verus Single Fit:

I really wanted to have a slim TPU case with nice buttons, and a unique look to it. I think this case fits that bill with its chamfered edges, and faux 2-piece bumper look. This case could easily be mistaken for its bigger sibling the High Pro Shield to an extent because the TPU looks like it has 2 separate parts, but it doesn’t. The nice chamfered edges are not without some compromises; the corners are very sharp, even more so than my Nexus 6P which has an aluminum frame. The edges do have a glossy finish on the back (not sure why they didn’t do it on the front so the display would blend into the case), and then there’s the ever so tiny raised camera outline on the back. I think the sharp edges will give you more grip than the softness of the TPU back if that gives you any idea of how this case feels (i.e. very smooth).

Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

Volume/Power buttons: Here is where things get more interesting with this case. The volume buttons try to click with some effort if you’re lucky, but the real show stopper is the power button. My case has the inside portion recessed too far, this not allowing you to even feel the button, let alone press it. You physically have to press the whole frame just like the Otterbox Symmetry to get this button to do anything other than sit there. Speaking of buttons, these are not fixed to the frame, therefore they can be removed if you desire. This won’t solve any of your problems, but none the less it can be done.

Overall: 5/10 A simple case should be just that: simple. The VRS Single Fit tries too hard to be like its big brother and it pays the price. Its buttons don’t allow you to do anything more than stare at them hoping they will move with enough effort at some point. Next, we have the sharp edges of the molded chamfered edges that must want to either scrape your hand or never be touched. I still feel the look of the case is quite nice in the end, it just needs a good amount of refining before I would consider using it for this phone or any others.

Verus Single Fit:









Button Issue (inside):





Here are some quick overview videos I made:
Video links:

Part 1:


Part 2:


Dimensions Table

 
Last edited:

berfles

Senior Member
Sep 4, 2011
470
55
Great reviews, thanks. I picked up the Luvvitt as a fill in for my Neo Hybrid from Spigen since those are backordered, sounds like I may just keep it on there for awhile though.
 

sanjay228

Senior Member
Dec 16, 2012
57
12
Thanks for the reviews! I currently have the Rugged Spigen case on my phone while I wait for the Tech21 to be delivered. The texture looks similar to the one for the GS5. I had that case on my GS5 since the first day I owned it and it was hands down the best case I have ever owned. At first I figured their shockproof technology was going to be gimmicky but I seriously can't even count how many times I dropped my S5 in circumstances where the screen should have cracked, and not once did anything happen. Along with a high quality tempered glass protector, you cannot go wrong.
 

Redflea

Senior Member
Nov 23, 2009
1,970
495
This is a great thread, thanks very much for the info and real-life pictures, so well done and helpful.

I was thinking about going w/a clear case for my S7 Edge - I pre-ordered the silver version, and would like to actually be able to see the phone rather than the case. I haven't used a clear case before, and your comments about dust caught my eye.

One of the reasons I ordered the silver, is I have owned a couple silver cars and they were the absolute best for hiding cosmetic flaws, dust, dirt, etc. Stuff that would stand out on a darker color are not noticeable or at least much less of a visual issue on silver.

Can you talk some more about what you mean about clear cases and dust issues? Are you saying that dust collects inside the case and is visible and looks bad? That's the only thing I can think of that is different from an opaque case - where you'd only see external dust.

Thanks!
 

Pilz

Senior Member
Dec 1, 2013
7,253
2,596
Texas
This is a great thread, thanks very much for the info and real-life pictures, so well done and helpful.

I was thinking about going w/a clear case for my S7 Edge - I pre-ordered the silver version, and would like to actually be able to see the phone rather than the case. I haven't used a clear case before, and your comments about dust caught my eye.

One of the reasons I ordered the silver, is I have owned a couple silver cars and they were the absolute best for hiding cosmetic flaws, dust, dirt, etc. Stuff that would stand out on a darker color are not noticeable or at least much less of a visual issue on silver.

Can you talk some more about what you mean about clear cases and dust issues? Are you saying that dust collects inside the case and is visible and looks bad? That's the only thing I can think of that is different from an opaque case - where you'd only see external dust.

Thanks!

Well mine is silver as you can see and the best way to describe it is a mirror. The phone is the embodiment of a mirror for better or worse, so a clear case amplifies the effectiveness of the back. I'll post my ultra hybrid review so you can see that clear case as well; I personally prefer frosted style cases to avoid the glare until my vinyl wraps (skins ) arrive. The Ringke has a lanyard loop on it, so dust gets under the case from that area. The Spigen still gets dust under it too, but it depends on where you keep the phone. I usually have mine in my pocket, so dust loves getting in the clear cases. It doesn't look good, and can lead to scratches on the back of your phone depending on the composition of the dirt. If you look at the pictures of my Incipio Octane (frosted back) vs the Ringke you can see the huge difference between how dust shows in either one. I always take care of my phones, but its difficult with such a reflective back on the S7E.
 
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Redflea

Senior Member
Nov 23, 2009
1,970
495
Thanks, Pilz, I was viewing this discussion on my phone earlier, so it was harder to see what you were referring to. On my laptop now and I can see what you're talking about.

I'm quite torn...I really wanted to have a clear case this time. I'll look forward to you next reviews and have to think about this.
 

Pilz

Senior Member
Dec 1, 2013
7,253
2,596
Texas
Thanks, Pilz, I was viewing this discussion on my phone earlier, so it was harder to see what you were referring to. On my laptop now and I can see what you're talking about.

I'm quite torn...I really wanted to have a clear case this time. I'll look forward to you next reviews and have to think about this.

I added the Ultra Hybrid to the OP. I tried to take more pictures of that one and the Ringke without getting any dust under, but it seems to like sticking to my phone or the case even if I use a lens wipe on it. I don't have this problem with my 6P case from Ringke or Spigen, so maybe its just how the S7E has a glass back. A TPU clear case might be a better bet like Spigens crystal one, but I'll have to get one to see.
 
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tbutler318

New member
Jul 19, 2012
2
0
What do you think of the Samsung case, Galaxy S7 Edge 2 Protective Cover, on the Samsung website? It looks thin and clean with decent protection in the corners. I would post the link but I'm under the post limit to add links, I apologize.
 

Pilz

Senior Member
Dec 1, 2013
7,253
2,596
Texas
What do you think of the Samsung case, Galaxy S7 Edge 2 Protective Cover, on the Samsung website? It looks thin and clean with decent protection in the corners. I would post the link but I'm under the post limit to add links, I apologize.

I'm not a fan of any of Samsungs cases. They don't really offer s lot of protection , pkus they're expensive for what you're getting. Are you talking about the Samsung Clear case or the leather one?

Sent from my Nexus 6P using XDA Labs
 

AngelaRI

Member
Mar 25, 2014
23
0
Dublin
I have the Spigen Liquid Crystal Semi-Transparent Soft Case - phone came out of it's box and directly into the case, and I'm very impressed with it so far - fits perfectly, snug and slim, easy to hold, not too slippery.
My only very minor gripe would be that it shows fingerprints very quickly, but that's pretty much to be expected with any kind of glossy case I guess. Overall, love it!

Got it from Amazon UK for a very good price
 

Pilz

Senior Member
Dec 1, 2013
7,253
2,596
Texas
I have the Spigen Liquid Crystal Semi-Transparent Soft Case - phone came out of it's box and directly into the case, and I'm very impressed with it so far - fits perfectly, snug and slim, easy to hold, not too slippery.
My only very minor gripe would be that it shows fingerprints very quickly, but that's pretty much to be expected with any kind of glossy case I guess. Overall, love it!

Got it from Amazon UK for a very good price

I have one on order, so I'll add it to the OP. I hope it turns out well for me too

Sent from my Nexus 6P using XDA Labs
 

tbutler318

New member
Jul 19, 2012
2
0
I'm not a fan of any of Samsungs cases. They don't really offer s lot of protection , pkus they're expensive for what you're getting. Are you talking about the Samsung Clear case or the leather one?

Sent from my Nexus 6P using XDA Labs

Clear case. It looks nice, although expensive, so I figured I'd give it a shot. I'll probably end up getting a few different cases with the S7, but if the Samsung case is surprising in one way or another I'll post about it. I'm pretty careful with my phone, my current s5 looks fairly new :eek:
 

Pilz

Senior Member
Dec 1, 2013
7,253
2,596
Texas
Clear case. It looks nice, although expensive, so I figured I'd give it a shot. I'll probably end up getting a few different cases with the S7, but if the Samsung case is surprising in one way or another I'll post about it. I'm pretty careful with my phone, my current s5 looks fairly new :eek:

I try to be careful, but I alwyas end up dropping my phone :( I'll post about the 4 new cases I'm getting as they arrive too. I really want the camera one

Sent from my Nexus 6P using XDA Labs
 

angelis

Senior Member
Nov 22, 2004
58
2
North Carolina
I'd suggest adding if the phone and case works with the VR unit. I have the Spigen Ultra Hybrid and it won't fit into the Gear VR unit. Taking it off and putting it on just a few times started messing with my iArmor TPU screen protector.
 

Pilz

Senior Member
Dec 1, 2013
7,253
2,596
Texas
I'd suggest adding if the phone and case works with the VR unit. I have the Spigen Ultra Hybrid and it won't fit into the Gear VR unit. Taking it off and putting it on just a few times started messing with my iArmor TPU screen protector.

I'll gladly do that whenever Samsung ships my VR. I don't like taking my phone out of its case unless I'm switching cases, or cleaning it, so that would be an issue for me. I will add a section to my table in post #2 for Gear VR compatibility.
 

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    Diztronic Voyeur:
    Over the years I’ve become quite a fan of Diztronics cases for several reasons. The simplicity of their design is refreshing compared to some other cases that appear to overdo certain things. The Voyeur case is a hybrid case featuring a TPU bumper alongside a clear polycarbonate back that has a scratch resistant coating on it. Along the backside of the case you will find four tiny feet (1 in each corner) which act as a means to keep the clear back off any surface which should prolong it’s life along with the scratch resistant coating. As per Diztronics usual set up, the TPU is very nicer (nicer than Spigen’s) and has a matte look to it. I really enjoy the look of this case overall, but first I want to mention some minor issues. First and foremost, I haven’t found a screen protector that will in fact work with this case. So far I’ve tried the newly redesigned Spigen film which arguable covers the least possible area on the front while still covering the edge. It lifted the edges on it immediately no matter how I placed the phone in. Next, I tried the VZW plastic ones which are also case friendly just like the Spigen ones are. This was also a failure, since the screen protector started to lift and wouldn’t go back down. (for the pictures I had to be extremely careful with the screen protector, and I had to constantly push it back down between each one I took). If you don’t use a screen protector, then this shouldn’t matter because the case is great. The last small issue is concerning the clear back; it is unfortunately subject to the same ‘watermarking’ aka rainbow effect when you apply pressure to it. I spoke with Diztronic about this, and they stated it should go away for the most part (at least the constant ‘stuck’ area, but the overall ‘watermarking’ will still occur when you apply pressure). If you’re using a skin on the S7 Edge this will be a non-issue for you.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

    Volume/Power buttons: Diztronic is well known for their excellent buttons, and this case upholds that standard. The buttons are all great, tactile, and genuinely feel nice to use!
    Overall:9/10 Despite the small ‘watermarking’ issue (which might get fixed if the case is revised), and the inability to use a screen protector so far the case is in my top 5 favorites. Not everyone uses a screen protector, so I didn’t let that count against its overall rating. Diztronic overall made a nice simple yet different styled case that is something anyone could appreciate.


    Diztronic Voyeur:




    Disclaimer: I was sent these cases from EasyACC in exchange for a fair and unbiased review.

    EasyACC TPU Clear Case:
    First let me start by saying this might be the thinnest case I’ve used yet with some catches. The case is similar to the other two extremely thin TPU cases that I recently review including the Spigen Liquid Crystal, and the Ringke Fusion Air. On the underside of the back you will find the same dot matrix pattern which helps prevent watermarking from occurring. (Watermarking is when the case sticks to the phone causing a rainbow like effect) Since the case is so thin, it doesn’t grip on the sides of the phone; the only parts holding your phone in the case are its four corners that wrap around the face of your S7 Edge. I’ve found this to cause some issues which I will go into further detail on. The volume buttons are the only thing on that side keeping the TPU from uncovering your edge, but when you look at the opposite side with the power button things start to change. The power button area of the case has a side ‘missing’ to it which essentially means it won’t hold the side of the TPU like it should. As I mentioned there is nothing preventing the sides of the case from pulling away when you hold the phone aside from where it encloses the buttons. Since the power button isn’t enclosed that whole side of the case pulls away from the phone as you hold it. The case won’t come off despite this because the four corners holding it to the phone wrap around enough to prevent that, but it's not exactly comforting to have one side of the case physically pop off while using it.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

    Volume/Power buttons: All of the buttons function well, and are tactile as you should expect from any slim case made from a TPU. There is a big issue with the power button section not fully wrapping around it which causes the side of the case to move outward as you use the phone.

    Overall: 5/10 There is a lot to like about cases like this particular thin one from EasyACC, but the rather alarming issue (design or quality control related) is enough to prevent me from putting my phone in it again.

    EasyACC TPU Clear Case:




    EasyACC Protective Armor Case:
    EasyACC was kind enough to provide another case for me to review, but this time it’s a 2-layer hybrid as opposed to a thin TPU one. This case is nearly identical in terms of styling, function and feel to one my wife uses on her Nexus 6P that she really enjoys. It included 2 different colored back ‘plastic’ panels that can be interchanged depending on what your personal taste is on any given day. My particular case included both a black, and mint back alongside the inner TPU. Each of the back panels is subtly textured giving them a nice feel, but not necessarily what I would call any real grip over a conventional TPU case like my Spigen Rugged Armor. I have no issues with the cases fit at with either of the two included back panels. This case does have a rather large camera cutout that seems over the top to me, but it might be more appealing to other people. I personally prefer to have as much of the back glass covered and protected since I am prone to dropping my phone. The larger cutout does not affect any function of the phone, but is a personal preference of mine to have a smaller one.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

    Volume/Power buttons: The buttons float freely inside of the inner TPU shell allowing for a pleasant, but sometimes sensitive button pushing experience. I did notice how the buttons can be hit accidentally due to how much they stick out from the TPU, and how sensitive they are. This isn’t a huge deal to me, but it might me for people that keep their phone in a bag where it could be accidentally turned on.

    Overall: 7/10 I think this is a decent offering in the two-piece hybrid case area due to its included spare shell, and overall good feel. There are some areas that could use improvement such as the button protrusion and large camera cutout, but overall I didn’t find any big issues with this case.

    EasyACC Protective Armor Case:







    Evutec Karbon SI Lite:
    I was very interested to see an hybrid case that used real carbon fiber given it’s durability. The case itself is very thin, and almost has a fake silicon coated feeling to the TPU bumper. I’m still rather neutral on how the TPU feels, but along the backside is where things get interesting, There’s a carbon fiber insert that adds durability (I would at least hope it does) with an extremely smooth finish to it. My case arrived with a small defect in the carbon fiber where it borders the TPU (looks like the coating is peeling away, I will take more pictures of that area). This should not hinder the cases durability, but it does detract from the look of the back panel since it cannot be unseen. On the bottom of the carbon fiber there is a ‘tramp stamp’ with the company’s logo similar to the type of nonsense some service providers do that will not be named. The logo is under layers of a “scratch resistant” coating, so there’s no hope of it being removed at any point. The case feels very loose as another member mentioned around the middle of the edge, or frankly anywhere along the sides. I thought for a moment that my phone was going to pop out and suffer a K.O. by hitting the pavement when I pulled it out of my pocket earlier this evening.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

    Volume/Power buttons: All of the buttons are great, making that the only good part about this case so far.

    Overall: 7/10 Like many people, I love the look of carbon fiber, especially when it’s the real deal. This case threw away a lot of that appeal when it arrived with a defect, and didn’t hold my phone securely as any case should. I won’t sacrifice looks for protection here, so despite the effort, and tactile buttons I would avoid buying one of these.

    Evutec Karbon SI Lite






    Incipio Dual Pro Shine:

    I’ve always been a fan of Incipio cases including the one I currently have on my Surface Pro 4 and Nexus 6P. The Dual Pro Shine for the S7E was a letdown. The case doesn’t have the same quality feel that all of my other Incipio cases do. When I put my S7E in the case the polycarbonate shell didn’t fully fit around the TPU insert which was concerning to me. It detracted from the overall appearance, and feel of the case. When I compared the TPU insert to my Nexus 6P’s Dual Pro it just felt stiff and cheap, so I’m not sure what Incipio was thinking when they released this version of the case. It almost feels like a hard plastic at times despite being a TPU. On the front side of the insert the border has a glossy finish which helps it blend in with your screen as a nice touch to an otherwise mediocre case. I enjoy the brushed metal back because it actually looks like brushed metal unlike some cases I’ve seen. It doesn’t have a texture to it, so you might be disappointed if you’re expecting some added grip from the back.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

    Volume/Power buttons: The volume and power buttons on this case are very stiff which makes it hard know if you actually hit the buttons or not. The volume buttons are a little better than the power button, but still difficult to press in the end. I’ve noticed that sometimes the S7E will have issues with the power button’s tactile feel in a case if you don’t install it correctly, but I checked the feel with/without the PC shell. I also checked how responsive the buttons were based on the way I inserted the phone (one side first, top first etc) to no avail.

    Overall: 7/10 The poor fitment of the polycarbonate shell coupled with the extra stiff buttons ruined an otherwise good case. If Incipio addresses these issues I would enjoy using it a lot more.

    Incipio Dual Pro Shine





    Incipio Dual Pro:
    After the disaster that was the Dual Pro Shine, I decided to give Incipio another chance at redeeming itself. The Dual Pro (original) was the case I originally wanted because I have the same one for my Nexus 6P, and it’s great. Incipio kept the same soft feel coated polycarbonate outer shell which I appreciate. The only downside to the soft touch finish is that it shows marks easily (most of them will go away if you wipe them with a damp cloth). I don’t really mind if it shows marks or not since it feels really nice to hold. Although the soft feel/soft touch (same thing) back feel nice, it can be a little slippery, but not more so than a normal TPU case. At times the grip does feel better I would say its subjective. All of the other key areas that I really loved on my 6P version remain (unlike the Dual Pro Shine).
    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.
    Volume/Power buttons: Finally, Incipio made their normal Dual Pro case as good as it should be! The buttons are nothing short of excellent (on par with my Speck case now!) which surprised me after using the Dual Pro Shine with its horrible buttons. Frankly I doubt buttons will get any better than these or the Speck’s (I am open to seeing that happen), but this one is right alongside it. Needless to say you will not be disappointed with any buttons on this case.

    Overall: 6.5/10Incipio’s Dual Pro tops my list of excellent cases now that their button issue seen on the Dual Pro Shine seems to have been fixed (or maybe mine was just defective?). The soft touch back panel, dual layered build, and excellent buttons make it one of the best cases I’ve used to date.
    Update: After using the case for a few weeks one of the outer shell "plextonium" corners started to become loose and pull away from the inner TPU. I contacted Incipio about this issue, and updated the overall review score.

    Incipio Dual Pro




    Incipio Octane:
    I had high expectations for this case like the other Incipio above, and this case lived up to most of them. First this case is a hybrid style (hybrid cases are my favorite) featuring a TPU type bumper, and a poly-carbonate or possible acrylic frosted back. I have a feeling the back is likely acrylic because cases that are frosted usually are (I will look into whether or not it is). The slides have a nice 'tire' texture, but don't get your hopes up about this providing any more grip than a smooth one because it doesn't. The texture is very much aesthetic which hurts the initial appear of this case. I was hoping the bumper would have provided more grip since most cases that I have are slick which is bad for an all glass phone with a curved display. The case itself is high quality as you might expect from Incipio, but I don't think it's worth the $25 price tag given how some of my 'cheaper' cases are equally nice if not better.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

    Volume/Power buttons: The power button will occasionally have issues clicking no matter how I insert the phone making the case frustrating to use at times. The volume buttons also suffer the same issue, so I can't exactly say that's a good thing. If the buttons don't click well it makes recommending this case difficult.


    Overall: 8/10 Incipio made an attractive looking case that is hindered by its slippery exterior and stiff buttons like the Dual Pro. I can't recommend it due to the button issues which are a big deal when it comes to using a case, but other than that everything else is good.

    Incipio Octane



    Incipio Performance Level 4:
    After using the Performance Level 3 case, and enjoying how nice it was, I opted to go one step further with the Level 4 case. Now, let me start off by saying the physical design looks very similar, but that’s about it. The case is very different in the way it feels, functions and protects the phone. At first I thought the case was quite nice (as you can see in the unboxing video I posted), but after using it for a few days I found many issues that kept me from really enjoying it in the same way I did the Level 3 case.
    First, let’s talk about the design; Incipio opted for a 2-piece case along with a holster which is fine, but they made the bumper area of the outer shell clear which I don’t like at all. While the case does have a nice ‘honeycomb’ textured molded into both the inner TPU and outer PC (technically it’s a 4-layer case) shell that should help distribute the shock effectively. The outer shell has a cheap feel along the edges even though the backside feels nice in a way similar to the Level 3 case.

    Secondly, the bottom speaker is covered by the cases shell muffling it, and honestly making the speaker very hard to hear. I don’t know what Incipio was thinking when they designed this particular part because it is nothing short of idiotic.
    The case is rated to handle 12[ft] drops which I can see being true despite how mixed feelings about its design. I wish Incipio stayed with their Level 3 design (not just the looks) because it was significantly better. With all of that aside, the included holster functions well and is nice. I prefer this holster design (since you put the phone in vertically) over the way SUPCase has their Beetle Pro holster. It has a hefty belt clip that again isn’t as thick as the SUPCase, but it seems to accommodate larger belts. Another quick point: The Level 3 case will fit in this holster despite being ever so slightly loose, so I wouldn’t use it in the horizontal position.

    Lastly, wireless charging only works with some of my chargers using this case. It works just fine with the official Samsung Fast Wireless charger, and the Choetech 10W Fast Wireless Charger. The phone will not charge with my Meenova wireless charger at all for whatever reason. This is still a single coil charger just like my other two, so maybe it has to do with the chargers design, or the distance between coils (the coil in the Meenova might be further away than the other two, thus not allowing it to charge using this case).

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried.

    Volume/Power buttons: I’ll start by saying their function is questionable at times. The power button seems to click fine with a nice tactile response, yet the volume rockers do not share this same sentiment. I’ve found that if I click them and miss the center of the button, then it will push the screen protector up which is not a good thing obviously.

    Overall: 7.5/10 With every nice feature/additional this case offers it also has a drawback. The added drop protection comes at the cost of mediocre buttons, and a muffled speaker. An included holster is a nice thing, yet the $18 SUPCase also has one, and seems to function better in some key areas. I cannot recommend this case currently unless Incipio addresses some of these major issues; I would stick with the tried and true Level 3 case over this one any day of the week.

    Incipio Performance Level 4:



    Level 3 vs 4 Quick look
    Level 4 Case unboxing
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    Otterbox Symmetry:

    I’ve never owned an Otterbox before because I couldn’t get over their clunky design that hindered the user experience. The Symmetry series is their thinnest least intrusive case from my understanding. Otterbox used a 2 material molded design which allowed the case to be 1 piece for ease of use. This design leads to the case having a different structure than your conventional hybrid which is usually a TPU/silicon bumper with a polycarbonate/acrylic back. Here the case has a hard plastic (not sure what type) back half with a high density silicon/TPU front half and core. The pictures below will show a better representation of what I’m referring to. Like many heavy duty cases this one doesn’t provide a lot of grip for some absurd reason. Now, make no mistake this case is still quite large and clunky, but in a more mild mannered way than its bigger sibling the Commuter (or for some other phones the Defender). There is a subtle texture on the back that all Otterbox cases seem to feature, but as I mentioned don’t expect a lot of grip from it. I enjoy the feel of this case, even its large size aside from a big downfall that I will talk about below.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. Since Otterbox is the so called ‘king’ of rugged cases they have huge cutouts to match their reputation. I can see more accessories potentially working with this case due to the large openings which I appreciate. There is a little loss of rigidity on the bottom due to the number and size of the cutouts, but it shouldn’t hinder the protection it provides.

    Volume/Power buttons: I still don’t know why manufacturers especially big names like Otterbox can’t make tactile feeling buttons! A lot of companies like Speck (their Candyshell), or even UAG seemed to have mastered this area despite not being as well known. I can’t make excuses for the ‘buttons’ on this case; they are so hard to press the whole side of the case physically moves a large amount just to press any of them. I was really looking forward to using this case when I go hiking due to its rugged nature in a slimmer profile, but not with buttons that need the Hulk to move. This one area is what will make or break a case, and it certainly ruined the case for me. I ended up returning it to BestBuy because I couldn’t deal with this kind of disregard on a $45 case.

    Overall: 7/10I truly enjoyed every part of this case, but the most important part of it was a letdown: the buttons. Otterbox knows how to make an excellent case, yet they don’t know what a tactile feeling button is, or how to even ensure they function easily. If you can get over that big drawback I see no reason not to buy this case because it was set to be one of my favorites alongside the Tech 21.


    Otterbox Symmetry:



    Disclaimer: I was sent these cases in exchange for a fair, unbiased review.

    Poetic Affinity:
    I first encountered Poetic’s cases back when I had my Nexus 7 (2013) with their folio case. Since then Poetic has added a lot of cases, styles and generally changed their lineup. I was also send their Affinity case for my Nexus 6P earlier, which was later revised after other reviewers and myself brought up some concerns about the design/logos. Poetic doesn’t seem to have any of those issues with their S7 Edge Affinity case (they covered part of the Nexus logo on their 6P case). One thing I really enjoy about the Poetic case is how they kept the “grippy” angled ridges along the case sides. These ridges provide great grip along with giving the case a more “rugged” look.

    Along the back you will find ridges to keep the case’s clear section from directly touching any flat surface you put your phone on. This is particularly important because the clear area itself doesn’t seem to be overly scratch resistant, so every little detail like this matters. Each corner is also reinforced with added material to aide in the event of a drop or impact. I haven’t dropped my S7 Edge in this case, but I feel like it would handle most moderate drops as well as other cases in its class.

    Poetic sent me both color options to give me (and everyone else) a better idea of what they will look like, and how the differences look. For starters, the black accented case features a glossy top/bottom alongside the regular ridged black polycarbonate ridges. I like the look the black accented case gives because it uniquely offsets the clear sections while still giving the case an appealing look. The clear case handles things a little differently; there are no true glossy sections as seen on the black accented case. The clear one still maintains the exact size, dimension etc of the other color, but everything is clear of course. I think this option would look the best with the black S7 Edge, and the titanium silver which is the one I own.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

    Volume/Power buttons: I haven’t been disappointed with the Affinity case’s buttons for any device as of yet, and the same remains true here. All of the buttons are tactile, easy to locate and generally pleasing to use. I will note that the use of a skin/wrap such as SlickWraps or dbrand will make the buttons slightly less response. This won’t impact the cases feel to any meaning extent based on my usage so far, but I will update this note if anything changes.

    Overall: 9/10 Overall Poetic did a good job maintaining their design language while also making a solid case for the S7 Edge. I think the rugged style look will appeal to some people more than others, but there are no real major flaws in this case. My only concerns are with the clear area picking up scratches (I did notice a few after using it for a day, although none were really noticeable unless you went looking for them).


    Poetic Affinity Black/Clear:






    Poetic Affinity Clear/Clear:



    Ringke Fusion:

    Ringke is known for their sleek low profile cases which include their Fusion and slim fit lines. I opted for the Fusion in clear because it's nice to be able to see your phone while still protecting it. The Ringke Fusion comes with a clear film to place over the back of your phone so it doesn't have the rainbow effect that most polycarbonate clear cases suffer from. I accidentally installed the film in a rush and ruined it, but that's okay. You will notice that rainbow effect in the pictures because of this, but don't let that steer you away from this case. The back of the case has tiny feet on each corner to help keep your clear back scratch free along with its scratch resistant (not scratch proof) coating to ensure it stays good looking longer. I'm not sure if it's just my case or not, but I've noticed a bit of scratching on the back already. I've only used the case a few times since it arrived, so I hope it doesn't get worse at this rate. I know some of you might ask about yellowing because this is a clear case, but I own the same one for my Nexus 6P (since it was released) and haven't seen any discoloration at all ~5 months later. Any clear case can yellow it just depends on certain conditions which comes with the territory. The case is a gigantic dust magnet like any other clear case. I had a can of air next to my while taking the pictures along with a microfiber cloth. I can't count the number of times I wiped the phone off and blew away the dust then put it in the case only to see more dirt and dust that magically got in there.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones; all microphone cutouts are also present. Ringke opted to have port covers to keep dust out of the headphone jack and micro USB port. Although this isn't a big deal because the S7/S7E are both water resistant therefore also dust resistant, it's a nice touch to have on a non-bulky case.

    Volume/Power buttons: Ringke always has excellent buttons, but these are easier to accidentally push unlike the Tech 21. Their feel is identical to my LUVVITT case in a good way. You won't be disappointed here.

    Overall: 8.5/10 Ringke should have opted for a better way to avoid the notorious rain-bowing effect that's present on this case instead of including 1 film to install on the back of your phone. I know other manufacturers have found a better way to address this, so it makes using the case without a skin on my phone hard due to that. I've also noticed some scratching on the back already after using the case a handful of times which I hope doesn't get worse in a short period of time.


    Ringke Fusion




    Ringke Onyx:
    Ringke made some bold claims on their product page for this case, so I decided to give it a chance. In the usual Ringke style you will find port covers (not really necessary for the S7/S7 Edge due to their IP68 rating), and a generally slim profile. I was very surprised to open my Amazon box and see a case that was shaped more for a banana phone. The case arrived so bent I was waiting for curious George to take it away. Despite this rather interesting situation I found myself in, I decided to write my review of this case ignoring that issue in the overall rating. (it might not be Ringke’s fault the case arrived damaged even though it was in an undamaged box with plenty of air pockets) I want to note how Ringke’s claim that this case will give you a better grip is completely false unless you count the sharp edges digging into your hand “better grip”. Yes, all of the edges on this case are sharp enough to shave with since Ringke must want this to be a true utilitarian item with its rugged design. Aside from the bad puns I’ve been adding in here the case has a different design that you typically find out there. Ringke did opt for the brushed metal TPU look, but with a catch. There are little dots recessed into the TPU like a dot view case giving it an interesting look. I don’t know how I personally feel about them, but nonetheless they’re going to stare at you every time you put down the phone. I do appreciate the case of a raised bevel to protect the camera like I first saw on their Fusion Air case. This should also help protect that area in general from other impacts which is a plus.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

    Volume/Power buttons: If I ignore how the banana case was sitting on my phone, the buttons would click just fine, and in fact were identical to Ringke’s others two cases I have in terms of feel. It’s not every day that a company’s cases will have this type of consistency in at least one area.
    Overall: 6/10 I’m not quite sure what Ringke had in mind when they decided to make this case. It does not provide any additional grip from what I can tell using it, the edges are essentially razors, and the port covers are a little over the top. I do like how the buttons still have a consistent feel, but other than that and the raised camera lip the case is more of a flop.

    Ringke Onyx:








    Here you can see the nice banana-like shape it has





    Ringke Fusion Air:
    Ringke decided to make a case that is a different take on their normal yet popular Fusion line. The Ringke Fusion Air is a slightly thinner 100% TPU version of the standard version from what I can tell with a few small changes. First, Ringke added in a dot matrix to the inside of the case to prevent the watermarking I first noticed on my Fusion. Next, they added in a slightly raised “U-Shaped” camera bevel to help better protect the sensor. Other than those small changes everything else largely remained the same; however, since the TPU is very thin, the sides are easy to pull from the edge which is concerning to me.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

    Volume/Power buttons: The same as the normal Fusion: “Ringke always has excellent buttons, but these are easier to accidentally push unlike the Tech 21. Their feel is identical to my LUVVITT case in a good way. You won't be disappointed here.”
    Overall: 7/10 Ringke made a rather compelling slim TPU case that addressed many of the issues with its larger sibling, but it also an issue. The sides of the case were abnormally loose due to the thinness of the TPU. This makes it very hard to fully recommend the case because it could cause issues during normal use.


    Ringke Fusion Air:





    Speck Candyshell:

    I really liked my Speck Candyshell for my Nexus 6P, so I wanted to also get one for my S7 Edge. The first Speck I bought for this phone was their Oynx black ‘clear’ case. It was horrible, with buttons that did not move at all (maybe it was defective) either way I sent it back. Today I saw the white Candyshell in the store, so I decided to buy it because it’s the same color as my other one that I have. Speck has the best grip out of any case I’ve used period. If you drop this case then your hands are probably covered in oil/butter/soap because it’s that good. The reason I bought the white one over the black Candyshell is because for better or worse the plastic back scratches relatively easily, thus the white one would show the scratches less. Speck’s case is a hybrid with a plastic back wrapped around a TPU core that is Mil-Spec drop test rated for added confidence. I think Speck nailed it with this case compared to the Otterbox equivalent.
    I’m going to repeat some things here because there is only so much you can say about the port/headphone cutouts

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. Speck’s headphone and micro USB port are oversized, so most if not all cables should work just fine.

    Volume/Power buttons: This case has the best buttons hands down as of [3/11] when writing this. They are tactile, easy to find, and just overall perfect! I don’t know how they could get better other than to have a texture on the vol+ and power buttons to help quickly identify them. I will be surprised to find better feeling buttons on a case.

    Overall: 9.5/10 Speck has the best overall case so far with their super ‘grippy’ back, superb buttons, and Mil-Spec drop test rating this is the case if you need just 1. (I will update this if I find a better one.)

    Speck Candyshell:




    Incipio Performance Level 3:
    I was intrigued by Incipio when they first announced their Performance series earlier this year; I wasn’t sure what to expect from the bold claims they made until I received this one the other day. First let me state how this case is very reminiscent of a thinner Otterbox in terms of feel, but with a significantly improved profile and button design. I haven’t tried to hide the hit and miss experience encountered with Incipio’s cases as of lately. I do appreciate their general desire to fix issues when they occur. According to the box, this case can handle 9[ft] drops (their level 4 case apparently handles 12[ft] ones when it gets released. This means you shouldn’t have to worry about your phone breaking during a hard fall just like the Tech 21, or Speck Candyshell. I dropped my phone earlier today in this case after washing my hands, and it fell about 6[ft] down a step. I wasn’t as worried given the cases ‘rated drop protection’; thankfully I was proven right and the phone/case came out 100% undamaged without even the smallest mark!

    Make no mistake, this case is not a TPU style, in fact I’m not quite sure what you would call the material. Incipio calls this particular case a “tri-molded design” featuring a polycarbonate back that certainly doesn’t scratch easily. The case has a unique inverse ridge (the cyan colored section for the black case I have) that is a different material than the back, or bumper judging by the language used on their website. I think the design is very interesting, and it feels great. While the case may be a little slippery, it’s no more so than a conventional TPU case in my experience. Overall it still beats the oil slick Tech 21 Evo Frame. I appreciate the use of a subtle texturing throughout the case that I’m sure helps prevent scratches in some capacity.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. The ports might not be aligned 100% perfectly on this case, but that’s more a common issue among S7 Edge cases that I have seen. It doesn’t present any issues in terms of the functionality of the case, but it will bother some people.

    Volume/Power buttons: Generally speaking, I’ve never been fond of flat styled volume or power buttons on a case; Incipio has made me reconsider that viewpoint. I think they did an exceptional job making the flush buttons work well unlike the ones on Spigen’s Tough Armor. Finding the buttons is easy due the inverted cyan ridge that runs around the cases frame. These buttons are also every bit as tactile as my Speck, or any other case that has good buttons.

    Overall: 9.5/10For the first time I think I’ve found a case that walks the fine line between excellent protection, thin form, and durability. It’s slightly bigger than the Tech 21, but still smaller than my large Speck while still offering a balance between those two in terms of grip and other aspects. I Plan to use this case as my new DD for the reasons mentioned.


    Incipio Performance Level 3:


    24

    Incipio Stowaway:
    As a full-time undergraduate (soon to be graduate) student I don’t like to carry more things that I absolutely need on a daily basis. I always have my phone with me for the usual reasons like emails, browsing the web, music etc., but I’ve come to realize that some payment terminals are dumb and always give an error with Samsung Pay. (There’s one place around me in particular that does work, but it sometimes takes 4-5 attempts for an unknown reason; other times it works there flawlessly.) I decided that I wanted to get a wallet or rather card case for my S7 Edge to supplement Samsung Pay along with my drivers license, and credit card just in case.

    Initially, I ordered this case way back when the S7 Edge was first shipping and Incipio posted pre-orders on Amazon. Then, sometime afterwards I canceled the order due to the release date still being unknown. Now that the case has been released I decided to still get one, but this time I ordered directly from Incipio.
    The case comes with what at first seemed like an oddly small screen protector, but it’s nothing of that particular sort. Instead, the film is to be placed on the back of the device to prevent your cards from scratching the glass. Since the card area opens up directly to the glass of your phone in order to accommodate the 3 cards it fits, this was Incipio’s solution. I don’t mind the idea personally in order to cut down on the already large size of this particular case, but I’m sure there will be people out there that hate it. Incipio shows the card cover being used as a kick stand on their website, yet when I tried to stand the phone up with it, the phone would fall no matter what. Maybe at some point it will allow me to stand it up like that, but for now it simply won’t. I don’t care for kickstands anyway, so this doesn’t matter to me in the greater scheme of things. I like how the case is able to accommodate 3 cards (I had my drivers license, credit card, and CCW in there with a tiny bit of room left for maybe a business card too).

    There were some issues since this was a first batch case from what I can tell after speaking with Incipio at length earlier this afternoon. I noticed tons of molding marks around the card flap that didn’t feel as refined as they should. Incipio was nice enough to send me a replacement, so for now I will leave that negative bit out of my overall rating by going under the assumption that the replacement will be better. If it is not better, then I will update this review to reflect that.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones; all microphone cutouts are also present.

    Volume/Power buttons: All of the buttons function with a pleasant natural click, and gave me no issues while using it this evening.
    Overall: 8.5/10 Incipio made a nice looking case that hopefully won’t experience any of the issues seen on their Dual Pro after a few weeks of use. I am skeptical about the card cover working as a kickstand, but for now it doesn’t.

    Incipio Stowaway:






    LUVVITT TPU:

    This is my first case from LUVVITT, and certainly won’t be my last. The case itself looks like a clone of the Spigen Rugged Armor, but in some ways it’s better. First, the case has a lower profile than the Spigen which is good if you want a thinner TPU case, but bad if you expect the same level of protection as the Spigen. The TPU has a nice feel to it, and almost features a ‘softness’ to the back which makes it comfortable to hold. On the backside the faux carbon is much less pronounced than the Spigen, but overall it still looks nice. There is also a raised lip for the camera to help prevent any damage when laying it down on the table.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones; all microphone cutouts are also present.
    Volume/Power buttons: This case has excellent buttons unlike some of the others. I cannot stand when cases have horrible buttons that don’t have a distinguishable click (i.e. not responsive). These click perfectly, so you should not be disappointed on that front.

    Overall: 9/10 The overall feel of the case is great with nice tactile buttons, and low profile. The only downside I can find for this case is the fake ‘screws’ on the back, but that’s cosmetic and does not affect the quality of the case.

    LUVVITT TPU




    Spigen Wallet: After my disappointment with the Tech 21 EVO Wallet, I wanted to try another folio style case that might be better at a much lower price. I ordered this case a while ago during their $4 sale, and it just arrived the other day. Overall the feel of the case is about what I expected: the texture nothing fancy, but rather a simple generic faux leather like feel on the outside of the case. Inside you will find 3 card slots, and an internal pocket for cash, or some other small thin paper. The case that is affixed to the folio is actually their slim fit case with a few slight changes to make it fit inside the folio properly. I was disappointed to yet again receive a bent case from Amazon. I don’t know why I’ve been lucky enough to get damaged cases late, but it needs to be corrected. I won’t let that count against the case for this review despite the damage being quite obvious.

    On the outside of the folio there is also a magnetic flat to keep the case closed when you’re not using it which is something that not every folio offers but should. It does fold around to the backside of the case in an attempt to keep it out of the way during use of the phone. I don’t like how Spigen has their card pockets inside because they’re quite large, and deep which allows the case to really get thick in a hurry. I had difficulty closing the case with the magnetic flap when 3 cards were inside of it with/without the phone. I even tried to ‘unbend’ the case to see if that would make a difference but it did not. I noticed how the flap would occasionally come off because of this design issue. Overall the case was harder to get used to than my Tech 21 Evo Wallet, and significantly thicker even without a card in it due to its design. There is also no sleep/wake magnet built into the case; not that I expected one even at its normal selling price. I don’t know why more companies don’t offer the sleep/wake magnet in their cases to make the folio better.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

    Volume/Power buttons: The case has cutouts for the buttons, so there is no issue using them.

    Overall: 6.5/10 There are a few key issues with this case: First, the case has card slots that are overly large which adds bulk. Second, the durability seems questionable since it started to suffer plastic deformation when I tried to bend it back to it’s original shape slightly. (this is different than it arriving bent because it started to physically break when I use minimal effort to bend it back). Lastly, the phone is very difficult to use in the folio even when the back cover is folded back; when you add in the lack of a sleep/wake function it makes this case even harder to recommend.

    Spigen Wallet:



    Without Cards







    With Cards in it








    Spigen Rugged Armor:
    Spigen cases are usually my go to when I get a new phone due to their quality, and overall nice design. I haven’t liked their recent offers with the disaster they created with their Nexus 6P NeoHybrid EX. I decided to stay with the cases that I know will always be worry free (from past experience). The Rugged Armor is one of their best-selling cases, and one look at it will explain why. Spigen has opted for a simple TPU case with faux carbon fiber ‘inserts’ that provide a unique look which many other case makers have copied (LUVVITT). Spigen’s offering is thicker than some of the other TPU cases out there hence its name ‘Rugged Armor’. This case is by no means intended to handle big drops like the Tech 21, Speck, or Otterbox, but it will work just fine for everyday accidents. Spigen added in a small raised lip for the camera too which I think is a nice touch to help protect your new S7 Edge from any potential damage. The back of the case has a nice smooth texture that is hard to really explain. It feels soft, but at the same time durable.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. Spigens headphone/USB port cutouts are usually on the larger side, so they might accommodate some slightly larger cables/headphones depending on how big they are.
    Volume/Power buttons: Just like the Tech 21 case, Spigen has tactile buttons that are easy to press, but they are harder to accidentally knock.

    Overall: 9/10Spigen has one of the best TPU cases out there today, (maybe Diztronic will make a S7E case soon) that provides you with slim good looking protection for your everyday routine.

    Spigen Rugged Armor:





    Spigen NeoHybrid Crystal:

    With every phone I find it increasingly difficult to find a good clear case. The S7E has cases continue this trend with none of them really being great. I was really hoping Spigen corrected all of their mistakes on the Nexus 6P’s NeoHybrid EX (now called the crystal), and to an extent Spigen did. The buttons were removed from the frame, and molded into the TPU which helped fix one issue while also ignoring another one (see below in the buttons section). The clear area of the case has a ‘dot matrix’ inside texture that helps prevent the clear area from sticking to your phone and giving you the rainbow effect seen on the Ringke/Spigen Ultra Hybrid. I like the use of this pattern because it doesn’t distort the clarity of the clear section enough to be noticeable, yet it adds some good benefits. My big issue with this case is how the frame sits on the TPU portion. If you install the frame from either the top or bottom as described in the instructions the sides will be very loose. I’m not talking about the frame falling off per say, but the sides are loose enough to fit a business card between the frame/case. That’s not a good thing when you consider that I pulled the frame out in that area just by picking up my phone. My fingers will constantly ‘catch’ the frame along the sides thus pulling it out and making the case feel cheap. Since the frame is loose along the sides it also gives the case a ‘squishy’ feeling when you hold it. I cannot stand how much flex this has due to the frame not sitting correctly. It boils down to how the frame is tensioned when installing it. The bottom is secured first, then you pop it on the sides before finally pushing the top part into the TPU section. This puts a lot of tension in the 4 corners of the case, this making the sides loose since they are the longest part of the frame. The top/bottom have more TPU to sit in, so they are very snug, but the sides are just horribly loose. My Nexus 6P case had the same issue which was ‘revised’ later one, yet the issue persisted even with the new version. If Spigen does “try” to fix this for the S7E I can’t confidently say it will do anything beneficial.
    I’m going to repeat some things here because there is only so much you can say about the port/headphone cutouts

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

    Volume/Power buttons: The buttons themselves click perfectly fine until you install the frame. Now, since the frame is loose along the sides it almost sits flush with the buttons which makes them harder to located and press. Spigen needs to completely redesign their NeoHybrid Crystal to avoid this issue rather than adjust little things here and there while avoiding the bigger issue.

    Overall: 6.5/10There is a lot of potential for this case, but all of that is wasted on a flimsy, poorly design plastic bumper that cheaply wraps together a great TPU case. The bumper is the single biggest let down here, and I hope it will be swiftly corrected. Spigen’s clear TPU is one of the best I’ve seen, so it’s disappointing to see it paired with such a terrible bumper.

    Spigen NeoHybrid Crystal:


    19

    Tech 21 EVO Wallet:

    I enjoyed my first Tech 21 case enough to get their wallet/folio version of it. There is a lot to like about this case: nice feel, drop protection, magnetic closing cover, 1 card slot etc... I mainly wanted to get a wallet case so I could carry my drivers license with me while at school without carrying my wallet. Samsung Pay really revolutionized mobile payments in my opinion. I was a long time user of Google Wallet/Android Pay, but nothing compares Samsung Pay. I like how I only need to carry the phone and my DL which all fits into a slim package that Tech 21 has offered. The case has a nice angled ribbing on the folio section that provides a good amount of grip (of course not as good as the Speck). I’m not worried about breaking my phone if I drop it in this case due to its all-around protection. There is a cutout for the notification LED, and front earpiece so you can easily make calls/see notifications while the cover is closed.
    Before I go on there is one HUGE downfall to this case that might ruin it for most people. The case does NOT have a sleep/wake function built into it for some reason that I cannot explain. I was on the verge of bringing it back the second I noticed this when I got into my car, but I figured would give it a day of use before I made that choice. I like everything else about this case despite not liking folios in general, but that is a big enough omission to kill the case.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. The bottom/top cutouts are enlarged due to the added thickness that comes with the drop protection, but there still should be ample room for all of the normal things you would plug in.

    Volume/Power buttons: (same for the EVO Wallet) Tech 21 nailed the buttons on their EVO Wallet case. They have an excellent tactile feel that provides just enough resistance so you won’t accidentally press them. I have nothing but good things to say about the button feel here. There is a built in area on the folio section so you can press/know where the volume rockers are with the cover closed. On the power button side no side marking/feature exists, but you can still press the power button through the cover if you feel for it. This isn’t necessarily a pitfall alone, but the combination of no sleep/wake in the cover makes it very difficult to use the case.

    Overall: 7.5/10 There’s no doubt that Tech 21 makes nice cases, but they fell short on their EVO Wallet in the biggest way on this case. A Folio case should always have a sleep/wake function built into it, but Tech 21 did not include this for some reason, thus using the case can be cumbersome. If you can handle that omission, then this case is probably the best folio in terms of protection/functionality out there currently.

    Tech 21 EVO Wallet





    UAG:
    I was looking for another rugged, lightweight, & thin case which is when I remembered that UAG made cases. I always have a Nexus phone, so UAG isn’t keen on making cases for them aside from the clear version they had for the Motorola Nexus 6. I’ve heard good things about their cases from members on here as well, but now I am left asking myself what the really appeal was. Let’s start with the cases feel; it’s very boxy, and not in any way that I can appreciate/come to terms with. The case makes holding the phone very uncomfortable to put it bluntly. The top/bottom sides are as flat as can be with reinforced corners for added drop protection. Along the sides you will find some small divots whose goal is to provide more grip while holding this monster; they do in fact help give the sides more grip, but this case still makes the S7E feel closer to the size of my Nexus 6P in a normal TPU or hybrid case that I would use. Due to the way Samsung designed the S7 Edge, the UAG feels awkward to hold even when I compare it to my Supcase/Speck/Dual Pro/Poetic for my Nexus 6P; all of those cases are on the larger side too. UAG might make a case that protectors your phone from drops, and is “military drop tested” aka MILSPEC, but so is the Speck Candyshell. The Speck is exponentially more comfortable to hold, use and just generally looks better even with its ‘zebra’ color scheme. Another disappointing point about this case is the rather large scratch that’s on the inside. It arrived with plenty of scratches/marks on it, and the packaging didn’t have any film on the case to protect it during shipping. Then there’s the color, what UAG shows online is a deep blue, now what I received is more of a cheap toy looking ‘clearish’ McDonalds happy meal toy blue. I don’t know how else to describe the color, just know it’s not pretty.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

    Volume/Power buttons: The buttons click exceptionally well, yet they still fall short of the Speck and Dual Pro cases. Since UAG has a overly boxy design to this case the buttons are a lot harder to reach naturally. They don’t sit close to the bottom like they should, so this means you will routinely try to click the frame and not the actual button as I found out. One nice point to note is how UAG textured their power button, this still doesn’t make it any easier to find when using this case due to its design.

    Overall: 7/10 I hoped for another great case, especially since this was my first UAG; sadly, I was left with a case less ergonomic than the Otterbox Symmetry with more compromises than sides to its square shape. Despite the cases tactile, nice feeling buttons, their placement ruins the experience.


    UAG







    Verus Damda Clip:

    I’ve never had a card case for my phone before, but with the S7E’s Samsung Pay, I wanted to carry the least amount of cards possible in my wallet. I was eyeing this case for a while before Verus decided to send me one, so I was happy to get a chance to use it. I first want to start with some bad news; the case only conditionally works with wireless charging. I’ve tried it on all 3 of my wireless chargers (Samsung fast/Samsung standard/Choetech fast) and it only works on occasion. You can play with the positioning all day and it will charge for a moment or two before it inevitably stops. This is the first case I’ve used that does not work with wireless charging which really makes it hard for me to use. I personally prefer wireless charging over wired, especially when using a micro USB port and not a Type-C like on my 6P. The back of the case has a smooth, not at all ‘grippy’ plastic finish reminiscent of my old Samsung GSIII (for those of you who remember that beauty). Since I was sent the silver one it started to show some marks right away when I placed it on my coffee table, and measured it with my digital caliper. That’s not something that seems promising for the longevity of the case. I certainly do not mind if my cases get scratched during use, but I do mind when it happens without actually using the case for more than a few minutes. Now, the card slot on the back appears to be able to hold 1-3 cards depending on their thickness. It is angled downward to one side, and toward the camera module on the phone (I’m not sure why, see the pictures below). The clip itself doesn’t feel like it would stand up to daily use especially not with more than 1 card in there at a time. I had a little difficulty removing a card I placed in there for the pictures due to the friction from the inner TPU shell. It doesn’t feel overly bulky while you hold it, but it does like to slide around in my hand more than I’m comfortable with.
    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.
    Volume/Power buttons: All of the buttons are tactile/responsive thus giving this case a little silver lining that still can’t overcome its other pitfalls.
    Overall: 6.5/10 I am concerned with the longevity of the card clip on this case, and its overall durability given how soft the plastic seemed during my short use of it. The buttons are tactile (not the best, but still ‘good’), and the design is interesting overall. None of these good areas can outshine the issues with the case unless they get corrected at some point.

    Verus Damda Clip:









    With 1 card inside:






    Disclaimer: I was given these cases by VRS Designs (Verus) in exchange for my honest, and unbiased review/feedback.


    Verus High Pro Shield:

    This is only my second time getting cases from Verus, so I was hoping for the best. My first case I purchased from them was for my Nexus 6P, and it was anything but great. Verus reached out to me and asked for feedback on their S7 Edge cases, so I was happy to help out.
    Spigen has set a popular trend with their once great NeoHybrid line that has since gone downhill (as you can see in my reviews), which left a gap for other case makers to step in. Verus took this design of a plastic bumper/TPU case and added their own touch to it. The case features a brushed metal finish that looks quite pleasing, but doesn’t offer a whole lot in terms of the grip you might expect. The buttons float freely inside the plastic frame as well unlike their other High Pro Shield model that I have for my Nexus 6P which has them build into the TPU. I like the feel of the case despite it’s lack of grip on this already fragile phone. I was disappointed to feel how much the case moved or ‘flexed’ while holding it in my hand; this makes me very weary of using it in an environment where I could drop my phone on a hard surface (i.e. not at home on my carpet).

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. So far everything I’ve thrown at it fits which is a good start for this case.

    Volume/Power buttons: These buttons do click, but they suffer from the same frame flex that the Spigen has to a lesser extent. The whole plastic frame moves slightly as you depress each button, or simply hold it for that matter. To top things off the buttons also nearly sit flush with the frame thus making it even more similar to other plagued cases I’ve had to displeasure of using. If Verus used their design with the buttons affixed to the TPU (molded into it), then I believe that would fix some, but not all of these issues. The whole plastic frame/TPU case concept was great back when I had my Note 3, but ever since then I have not found a case like this that actually works well. The good old days of this style seem to be gone, and while I might miss those times, there are better case designs now.

    Overall: 6/10 Verus tried to correct some of the issues that are dragging other case manufacturers down, and to an extent they have. There are still many issues that need to be worked out before I will buy/use a case of this design again. I’ve given this styling many chances over the course of 5 phones only to be left in the dark disappointed asking myself why I keep using something that doesn’t work well.

    Verus High Pro Shield:




    pilz/Table_S7E_9.jpg[/IMG][/URL]


    Verus Single Fit:

    I really wanted to have a slim TPU case with nice buttons, and a unique look to it. I think this case fits that bill with its chamfered edges, and faux 2-piece bumper look. This case could easily be mistaken for its bigger sibling the High Pro Shield to an extent because the TPU looks like it has 2 separate parts, but it doesn’t. The nice chamfered edges are not without some compromises; the corners are very sharp, even more so than my Nexus 6P which has an aluminum frame. The edges do have a glossy finish on the back (not sure why they didn’t do it on the front so the display would blend into the case), and then there’s the ever so tiny raised camera outline on the back. I think the sharp edges will give you more grip than the softness of the TPU back if that gives you any idea of how this case feels (i.e. very smooth).

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

    Volume/Power buttons: Here is where things get more interesting with this case. The volume buttons try to click with some effort if you’re lucky, but the real show stopper is the power button. My case has the inside portion recessed too far, this not allowing you to even feel the button, let alone press it. You physically have to press the whole frame just like the Otterbox Symmetry to get this button to do anything other than sit there. Speaking of buttons, these are not fixed to the frame, therefore they can be removed if you desire. This won’t solve any of your problems, but none the less it can be done.

    Overall: 5/10 A simple case should be just that: simple. The VRS Single Fit tries too hard to be like its big brother and it pays the price. Its buttons don’t allow you to do anything more than stare at them hoping they will move with enough effort at some point. Next, we have the sharp edges of the molded chamfered edges that must want to either scrape your hand or never be touched. I still feel the look of the case is quite nice in the end, it just needs a good amount of refining before I would consider using it for this phone or any others.

    Verus Single Fit:









    Button Issue (inside):





    Here are some quick overview videos I made:
    Video links:

    Part 1:


    Part 2:


    Dimensions Table

    9

    Spigen NeoHybrid:

    This was Spigen’s original hybrid style case that they are known for, so you would expect their flagship case to be their best. There’s some bad news here like with the NeoHybrid Crystal I reviewed earlier: the plastic bumper still does not sit flush on the sides. Of my 6 Spigen case styles 3 of them have rather large issues including some of their most popular models.
    I have to hand it to Spigen, they have one of the best feeling TPU cases I’ve used to date, and this remains true for this case. The back is subtly textured giving you a little more grip than a standard TPU case or their other ones I’ve reviewed. Spigen opted for a style similar to Verus (VRS Design) where only the center portion has a texture while a small strip on the top/bottom of the case are just normal TPU as can be seen in the pictures. I mentioned this in my Verus High Pro Shield review: this type of hybrid style case hasn’t truly been great since the days of my Note 3 and its NeoHybrid that I loved. I think case manufacturers need to rethink the way their bumper (plastic) is designed and maybe opt for another material, or way to hold it in place better.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

    Volume/Power buttons: The buttons themselves are great when you remove the plastic bumper, but when it’s installed they are nothing short of a nightmare. I don’t know why anyone would want their buttons to be flush with the frame because it allows for accidental presses (I can push the frame near the buttons and it will catch the TPU button and press it) along with user frustration. What should be the easiest part of a case to perfect turns out to be the part where most companies struggle. The issue here isn’t even the buttons necessarily, it’s how the frame forces them to sit flush, and causes 99% of the issues.

    Overall: 6/10 A flagship case should be nothing short of the best in a company’s line up, but here it’s everything but that. The NeoHybrid had it’s moment of fame before phones shapes started to force a change in their design. What consumers are left with is a fantastic looking case that takes form over function with the numerous bumper issues manufacturers are having. I’ve reached out to Spigen several times about this exact issue, yet they have failed to address it time and time again. I think this will be my last NeoHybrid case, or any case with this design due to the numerous issues I’ve seen.

    Spigen NeoHybrid: (ignore my wet install screen protectors bubbles :)









    As you can see the bumper bows outward, and has a small gap still.





    Spigen Liquid Crystal:
    When I started to look for a clear case initially I found a lot of choices with some drawbacks. I was hoping to use a clear case to show off my S7 Edge with my SlickWraps skin since the normal back is way to reflective given that it’s silver (and essentially a mirror). Spigen seems to have either a hit/miss with their cases without a middle ground in sight. The liquid crystal is a hit with its low profile (just like the Thin Fit), and great overall feel. Spigen opted to use a dot matrix on the inside of the TPU to prevent it from having a rainbow effect as I noticed on my Ringke Fusion when the included matte protector wasn’t used. Given how the texture (barely noticeable) dot matrix is on the inside of the case it helps prevent dust from getting inside better than my other two clear cases did. The one downfall here is the slickness of the TPU. Unlike their Rugged Armor, this TPU is slippery, and a fingerprint magnet (less so than my Ringke Fusion or Ultra Hybrid). I wouldn’t say the case feels ‘premium’, but it does feel nice for the $2.99 I paid for it.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

    Volume/Power buttons: All of the buttons are excellent, tactile, and raised just enough to easily find. You won’t find any issues here, so that makes me like this case even more!

    Overall: 9.25/10
    Spigen Liquid Crystal
    The liquid crystal isn’t trying to be anything more than a simple clear TPU case, and it does that very well. It features great buttons, a slim profile, and a back region that doesn’t suffer from the rainbow effect. If you don’t need any extra grip, then I would recommend this case for a simple, effective TPU case.





    Spigen Thin Fit:

    I always like to have a slim case for my phones when using them at home because I don’t need any real protection besides from scratches and very small drops onto my carpet. I usually end up with the Spigen Thin Fit or Ringke Slim depending on which company offers a better thin fitting case for that particular phone. I chose the Spigen one this time around because it was available first, and like the Ringke it offers top/bottom protection. The case also has one of my favorite textures which is a ‘soft feel’ finish like the Nexus 5 (black model) had. It not only adds some grip to the case, it also just feels nice to hold. The case itself is extremely low profile and barely offers any face down ‘lift’ for your phone. Don’t expect this case to offer any real drop protection beyond a foot or so (even then it might be a gamble), but everyone’s experience will vary on that front. There is also a raised lip for the camera just like on their Rugged Armor which I like a lot.
    I’m going to repeat some things here because there is only so much you can say about the port/headphone cutouts

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. Spigens headphone/USB port cutouts are usually on the larger side, so they might accommodate some slightly larger cables/headphones depending on how big they are.

    Volume/Power buttons: There isn’t a whole lot to be said here since the button cutouts are completely open so you can easily access the phones actual buttons. There is ample room for your fingers, but not too much so it unnecessarily exposes the phone.

    Overall: 9.5/10Spigen is still making my favorite slim case the way they always have with the addition of top/bottom coverage. This is the slim case to get if that’s your style I highly recommend it!

    Spigen Thin Fit:




    Spigen Tough Armor:

    I decided to give Spigen’s other cases a chance because of the great deal they had on Amazon a few days ago. The Tough Armor is Spigen’s version of a true rugged case; it is the same as their slim armor with more bulk for added protection. The case does feature a small kickstand that only functions in one landscape position. I wouldn’t trust it to last considering how it’s made out of plastic with a very flimsy feel to it. The shell of the case is a plastic or soft with a smooth finish which as with other companies cases provides zero grip. As I mentioned above, these companies must want you to drop your phone in their rugged cases since they aren’t making them easy to hold with their large size and smooth surfaces. Spigen did add a glossy finish to their camera cutout that has a nice appearance to it even if it serves no function. The cutout still allows for easy access to the heart rate sensor which I completely forgot existed since I will never use it. The inner layer is made from Spigens high density TPU in a thicker form similar to the kind that is also used on their other cases.

    I’m going to repeat some things here because there is only so much you can say about the port/headphone cutouts

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. Spigen has ample room as with all of their cases, and their cutouts line up well with each port.

    Volume/Power buttons: I’m not sure why Spigen opted for buttons that are flush with the sides of the case. While these buttons do click well the way they’re implemented is questionable. I have no other real complaints besides how they sit, so you should be able to easily click the buttons assuming you can locate each one.

    Overall: 7.5/10Spigen did a lot of things right with this case including their use of thicker top/bottom TPU sections for added drop protection, but they dropped the ball in other areas. The kick stand is more of an afterthought, and should be removed if they aren’t going to make it more stable/durable. Next, the buttons are flush with the case which makes it hard to locate them. These are the only flaws I could find with a case that fits the bill in all other aspects.

    Spigen Tough Armor:





    Spigen Ultra Hybrid:

    Spigens case line up can get a little confusing with all of their very similar cases (slim armor, rugged armor, tough armor, NeoHybrid EX, Ultra Hybrid, and the crystal clear case). Their Ultra Hybrid usually tries to remain slim while offering a nice styling similar to what the slim armor is in their line up. The bumper around case is a TPU, while the back is polycarbonate. Unlike their NeoHybrid EX (the clear one) it doesn’t have a dot matrix style pattern to prevent fingerprints/smudges on the inside. Just like the Ringke Fusion this case is a fingerprint/dirt magnet for no apparent reason. It could be the coating on the polycarbonate, or another factor, but I didn’t have this issue on my Nexus 6P’s Ultra Hybrid case. This case also has 4 small feet to keep the back raised off a surface, and a scratch resistant coating on the back side (not the inside) just like the Ringke. As with all clear cases, there is no added grip from the back due to its anti-scratch coating.
    I’m going to repeat some things here because there is only so much you can say about the port/headphone cutouts

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. Spigens headphone/USB port cutouts are usually on the larger side, so they might accommodate some slightly larger cables/headphones depending on how big they are.

    Volume/Power buttons: I am very disappointed with the buttons on this case. Spigen’s other case that I have features great tactile buttons, but this one’s are like pressing concrete. They might be worse than the Incipio Dual Pro Shine I reviewed above which is quite a feat. I’ve only used this case one time because it’s unbearable to use the buttons.

    Overall: 7/10Spigen opted for their tried and true physical design with a catch: horrible buttons. I can deal with smudges, dirt and other issues, but the buttons not pressing is what kills the case for me. I know Spigen loves revising cases during their normal cycle without telling anyone, so knowing them there will be a new version of this case at some point (just like they did with the 6P) to fix any issues.

    Spigen Ultra Hybrid:

    Note: In the pictures the areas that look like smudges are where the case is touching the glass back of the phone, so you also get to deal with that.




    Supcase Beetle:
    Supcase is known for their unique designs, and rugged cases. Their line up usually consists of two primary cases: Beetle, and Beetle Pro. The first one is their thinner case which still provides ample protection with minimal bulk. The later version is more similar to an Otterbox Defender with over the top protection. I prefer minimal cases with the most protection out of preference, this is why I bought the regular Beetle. The Supcase utilizes a hybrid design featuring a TPU bumper and acrylic clear frosted back (they also have a solid black version). All 4 corners are designed to take larger impacts due to their size which also helps you grip the phone since the back isn’t exactly textured. There are 4 little circles around the back of the case too that are designed to keep the back lifted ever so slightly (paper thin) off a table so you won’t get scratches on it. I’ve used their cases for a long time now, most recently on my Nexus 6P. That particular case doesn’t show any external wear from use/falling on a treadmill numerous times while working out (my 6P still lives to tell the tale). The one downside about their frost clear back panel is that it scratches easily from the inside. When I place my phone in the case occasionally it would have the corner touch the inside frosted back and leave a permanent mark. Personally this isn’t a big deal to me, but I wanted to make everyone aware that this occurs.

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present.

    Volume/Power buttons: Supcase usually has tactile buttons that lean more toward the stiffer side of the spectrum. This case falls in line with that giving you a nice responsive feel more in line with the Speck/Incipio Dual Pro.

    Overall: 9/10 I enjoy using this case at the gym given its extra corner protection in a slimmer profile despite the back picking up marks easily while inserting your phone. Supcase still provides a great protective case in a slim profile relative to some of the other ones I have. This case rounds out my top 3 favorite hybrid cases as of [3/23].


    Supcase Beetle





    Tech 21 EVO Frame:

    I’ve heard a lot of good things about Tech 21 cases over the years, but this is my first one. I decided to opt for more protection in a slimmer package due to the S7E’s unique yet fragile design. This case is very tall compared to the rest of my line up due to the added in drop protection. Tech 21 claims their case is rated for a 2.2[m] ~6[ft] drop making it fairly heavy duty for everyday situations. There is a unique cushioning area in the extended top/bottom portions of the case which is likely why it has a higher drop test rating. The case is on the thinner side too making it comfortable to hold all while adding in extra drop protection. My one complaint with this case is how slippery it is. I think it’s ironic how the case is rated to handle drops, but then is slippery. It’s like they want you to drop your phone given how slick the outer edge can be. Around the backside the case has more of a TPU smoothness to it reminiscent of the Spigen Rugged Armor or LUVVITT TPU case. This is another expensive case that I believe is worth the money at the time of writing this. I had a Speck Candyshell in Oynx earlier one, but the buttons were so bad (edges were very thick too) I had to return it which is something I rarely do with cases.

    I’m going to repeat some things here because there is only so much you can say about the port/headphone cutouts

    Ports: The micro USB port has no issues fitting cables from any of these manufacturers: Tronsmart, Choetech, Samsung, Nvidia, Motorola, Aukey, and Anker. If you have large ‘studio’ style headphones with a massive aux cable you won’t be happy with the normal sized cutout for headphones, but it works fine with my Bose QC 20’s, Freestyles, OE’s, Samsung headphones, and some others I’ve tried. All microphone cutouts are also present. The bottom/top cutouts are enlarged due to the added thickness that comes with the drop protection, but there still should be ample room for all of the normal things you would plug in.

    Volume/Power buttons: Tech 21 nailed the buttons on their EVO Frame case. They have an excellent tactile feel that provides just enough resistance so you won’t accidentally press them. I have nothing but good things to say about the button feel here.

    Overall: 9/10I like many things about this case that put it at the top of my list, but the slick edges make me fumble with my new ~$800 phone more than I would like.

    Tech 21 EVO Frame